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Anglo-Saxon England: Volume 47 (Hardcover): Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes, Andy Orchard Anglo-Saxon England: Volume 47 (Hardcover)
Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes, Andy Orchard
R4,014 Discovery Miles 40 140 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The forty-seventh volume of Anglo-Saxon England begins with a record of the eighteenth conference of the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists, and ends with a fourth supplement to the Hand-list of Anglo-Saxon Non-Runic Inscriptions. Other articles in this volume cover a diverse range of subjects, including Skaldic art in Cnut's court, alliteration in Old English poetry, the northern world of an Anglo-Saxon mappa mundi and the Germanic context of Beowulf. Religious matters are given particular consideration in this volume: new light is shed on the lost St Margaret's crux nigra, and on Anglo-Breton contact between the tenth and twelfth centuries through an examination of St Kenelm and St Melor. Also included are an account of Archbishop Wulfstan's forgery of the 'laws of Edward and Guthrum', and an edition of the four sermons attributed to Candidus Witto. Each article is preceded by a short abstract.

Anglo-Saxon England: Volume 46 (Hardcover): Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes, Andy Orchard Anglo-Saxon England: Volume 46 (Hardcover)
Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes, Andy Orchard
R2,439 R2,258 Discovery Miles 22 580 Save R181 (7%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Contributions to the forty-sixth volume of Anglo-Saxon England focus on aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture and history across a period from the seventh to the eleventh century. The study of a fragment of a tenth-century sacramentary offers new evidence for the role of music in Anglo-Saxon England, while consideration of charter-evidence in both Latin and Old English from Worcester c.870 to 992 sheds fresh light on institutional interaction between the two main languages of Anglo-Saxon England. Two contributions consider Beowulf and its immediate manuscript-context, the first focusing on the spellings of the second scribe, and the next on the later history of the manuscript into the sixteenth century, facilitating its survival to this day. Finally, a detailed study of English landed society before and after the Norman Conquest has resulted in new perspectives on landed wealth in England in 1066 and 1086. Each article is preceded by a short abstract.

Anglo-Saxon England (Hardcover): Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes, Andy Orchard Anglo-Saxon England (Hardcover)
Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes, Andy Orchard
R2,572 R2,379 Discovery Miles 23 790 Save R193 (8%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The forty-fifth volume of Anglo-Saxon England focusses on various aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture and history from the seventh to the seventeenth century. In the field of Old English literature, contributions examine a ninth-century homily fragment, The Dream of the Rood, The Seafarer, and the Old English translation of Boethius' De Consolatione Philosophiae. A contribution which explores references to the senses in a wide range of vernacular texts is complemented by another which reconsiders the iconography of the Fuller Brooch. The network of fortifications recorded in the Burghal Hidage is re-interpreted here as a product of political developments in the later 870s; and a new edition of the 'Ely memoranda' reminds us that the religious houses of the tenth and eleventh centuries functioned also as major agricultural estates. Finally, the contribution of seventeenth-century antiquaries to the development of Anglo-Saxon studies is remembered in a study of an early Anglo-Saxon Grammar.

Anglo-Saxon England: Volume 42 (Hardcover, New): Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes Anglo-Saxon England: Volume 42 (Hardcover, New)
Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes
R2,510 R2,322 Discovery Miles 23 220 Save R188 (7%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The forty-second volume of Anglo-Saxon England begins with an article which introduces a 'new' Anglo-Latin poet to a modern audience, and ends with an article exploring the activities of a Norman archbishop of Canterbury when exiled from England in the early 1050s. Other disciplines well represented here are palaeography, philology, Old English language and literature, tenth-century diplomatic, and numismatics. Extended treatment is given to the reception in Anglo-Saxon England of a Latin life of St AEgidius, which lies behind the Old English Life of St Giles in Cambridge, Corpus Christi College MS 303. It is also a privilege for the journal to include the first scholarly publication of the recently discovered seal-matrix of a certain AElfric, presumed to have been a layman who flourished in the late tenth century; the object itself has been acquired by the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. Each article is preceded by a short abstract."

Anglo-Saxon England: Volume 44 (Hardcover): Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes Anglo-Saxon England: Volume 44 (Hardcover)
Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes
R2,564 R2,370 Discovery Miles 23 700 Save R194 (8%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The forty-fourth volume of Anglo-Saxon England contains three contributions on religious culture in eighth-century Northumbria, one discussing the conception of church buildings, one linking Bede and John of Beverley, and a comparison of Miracula Nynie episcopi and Arator. A discussion of the historical context of the battle of the Winwoed is complemented by a reconsideration of a literary work which influenced modern perceptions of King Edward the Confessor. Old English prose is represented by an analysis of the preface of Bede's Ecclesiastical History, and an examination of AElfric's treatment of the apostles. Old English poetry is covered by a contribution making the case for a new approach to the texts, and one addressing the riddles in the Exeter Book. This volume also covers military organization throughout the period, the practice of penance in the late eleventh century, and the discovery of an Anglo-Saxon hoard near Buckingham in 2014.

Anglo-Saxon England: Volume 43 (Hardcover): Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes Anglo-Saxon England: Volume 43 (Hardcover)
Rosalind Love, Simon Keynes
R2,780 R2,615 Discovery Miles 26 150 Save R165 (6%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The forty-third volume of Anglo-Saxon England contains three contributions on Latin learning in the early part of the period, two focusing on texts being studied at Canterbury, and a third discussing the recording of Cuthbert's cult at Lindisfarne. Old English poetry is well represented by three contributions which exemplify new approaches towards poetic diction and its sources, and reinterpret Cynewulf's use of runes. Old English prose meanwhile receives further attention through a reassessment of its intended audience, and in an analysis of Andreas. There is also a discussion of an unusual prayer first attested in the Leofric Missal. The theme of kingship is addressed in an article on different representations of King Cnut in Old English, Latin and Old Norse texts, and in an extended review of demonstrably or arguably 'royal' books in the Anglo-Saxon period. Each article is preceded by a short abstract.

Bede: On First Samuel (Paperback): Scott Degregorio Bede: On First Samuel (Paperback)
Scott Degregorio; Commentary by Scott Degregorio; Translated by Rosalind Love; Commentary by Rosalind Love
R1,092 Discovery Miles 10 920 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The Old Testament book 1 Samuel (known as 1 Kings in modern Bibles) contains one of the most dramatic stories in the Old Testament, with its tense narrative about Israel's first attempts to govern itself by kingship, and a cast of famous characters who drive the story - the priest and prophet Samuel, the tragic figure of King Saul, and chiefly David himself, the youngest son of Jesse, who slays the Philistine's champion, Goliath, and gains God's favour in replacement for Saul. The Venerable Bede (672-735 AD), Anglo-Saxon England's foremost interpreter of the Bible, wrote many commentaries on the Old Testament, but his treatment of 1 Samuel stands out in particular: it is one of his longest commentaries, one of his first sustained attempts to deal with the Old Testament without support from an earlier commentary, and one of the few commentaries he wrote that can be dated precisely. Bede sets out to read the story of 1 Samuel as full of details which demonstrate the prophetic nature of Old Testament history, an attempt that is boldly experimental in its application of the allegorical method of interpretation. Historically, the commentary is of special interest for its detailed reference to the departure of Abbot Ceolfrith from Wearmouth-Jarrow in June 716 AD, which has allowed scholarship to firmly date the work and explore some potential links to the turbulent political scene in Northumbria that marked that decade. This English translation is the first rendering of the Latin into another language. The translation is preceded by a substantial introduction that places the work in the context of Bede's oeuvre, discusses his sources and exegetical methods, and offers a reading of the work's contemporary context in the light of current scholarly debate.

Bede: On First Samuel (Hardcover): Scott Degregorio Bede: On First Samuel (Hardcover)
Scott Degregorio; Commentary by Scott Degregorio; Translated by Rosalind Love; Commentary by Rosalind Love
R3,235 Discovery Miles 32 350 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The Old Testament book 1 Samuel (known as 1 Kings in modern Bibles) contains one of the most dramatic stories in the Old Testament, with its tense narrative about Israel's first attempts to govern itself by kingship, and a cast of famous characters who drive the story - the priest and prophet Samuel, the tragic figure of King Saul, and chiefly David himself, the youngest son of Jesse, who slays the Philistine's champion, Goliath, and gains God's favour in replacement for Saul. The Venerable Bede (672-735 AD), Anglo-Saxon England's foremost interpreter of the Bible, wrote many commentaries on the Old Testament, but his treatment of 1 Samuel stands out in particular: it is one of his longest commentaries, one of his first sustained attempts to deal with the Old Testament without support from an earlier commentary, and one of the few commentaries he wrote that can be dated precisely. Bede sets out to read the story of 1 Samuel as full of details which demonstrate the prophetic nature of Old Testament history, an attempt that is boldly experimental in its application of the allegorical method of interpretation. Historically, the commentary is of special interest for its detailed reference to the departure of Abbot Ceolfrith from Wearmouth-Jarrow in June 716 AD, which has allowed scholarship to firmly date the work and explore some potential links to the turbulent political scene in Northumbria that marked that decade. This English translation is the first rendering of the Latin into another language. The translation is preceded by a substantial introduction that places the work in the context of Bede's oeuvre, discusses his sources and exegetical methods, and offers a reading of the work's contemporary context in the light of current scholarly debate.

The Warenne (Hyde) Chronicle (Hardcover, New): Elisabeth van Houts, Rosalind Love The Warenne (Hyde) Chronicle (Hardcover, New)
Elisabeth van Houts, Rosalind Love
R4,267 Discovery Miles 42 670 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The Warenne Chronicle is the more appropriate name for the Latin text known as the Hyde Chronicle. It covers the period from 1035 - the year in which Robert the Magnificent, duke of Normandy, died - up to the account of the White ship disaster in November 1120 when William Adelin, eldest son and heir of King Henry I, lost his life at the age of eighteen. The chronicle therefore covers the history of Normandy and England around the Norman Conquest of England with special reference to the earls of Warenne in Normandy. It is not a full blown dynastic history of this aristocratic family, but rather a historical narrative that emphasises the loyal support of the earls to the Norman rulers. The crucial question as to how far the Warenne chronicler may have covered the years beyond 1120 is impossible to settle definitively. The new argument put forward here is that the Warenne Chronicle was written early in the reign of King Henry II, probably shortly after 1157, for King Stephen's son William and his wife Isabel, heiress of Warenne, to provide an account of the invaluable help her ancestors had given to the Anglo-Norman rulers. Although the chronicle has survived anonymously, the suggestion is made that the author may have been Master Eustace of Boulogne, clerk and chancellor of William of Blois as fourth earl of Warenne. Unique information, other than that pertaining to the Warennes, concerns the commemoration of Queen Edith/Matilda, Henry I's rule in western Normandy, and the use of the word 'normananglus' (Norman-English) for the inhabitants of England of Norman origin.

The Reception of Boethius Consolation of Philosophy (Hardcover): Rosalind Love The Reception of Boethius Consolation of Philosophy (Hardcover)
Rosalind Love
R2,191 Discovery Miles 21 910 Out of stock
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