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Race, Nation, Translation - South African Essays, 1990-2013 (Paperback): Zoe Wicomb Race, Nation, Translation - South African Essays, 1990-2013 (Paperback)
Zoe Wicomb; Edited by Andrew Van Der Vlies
R380 R327 Discovery Miles 3 270 Save R53 (14%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

The most significant nonfiction writings of Zoë Wicomb, one of South Africa’s leading authors and intellectuals, are collected here for the first time in a single volume.

This compilation features critical essays on the works of such prominent South African writers as Bessie Head, Nadine Gordimer, Njabulo Ndebele, and J.M. Coetzee, as well as writings on gender politics, race, identity, visual art, sexuality and a wide range of other cultural and political topics. Also included are a reflection on Nelson Mandela and a revealing interview with Wicomb.

In these essays, written between 1990 and 2013, Wicomb offers insight on her nation’s history, policies, and people. In a world in which nationalist rhetoric is on the rise and diversity and pluralism are the declared enemies of right-wing populist movements, her essays speak powerfully to a wide range of international issues.

Still Life (Paperback): Zoe Wicomb Still Life (Paperback)
Zoe Wicomb
Sold By Readers Warehouse - Fulfilled by Loot
R290 R229 Discovery Miles 2 290 Save R61 (21%) Ships in 7 - 10 working days

Few in his native Scotland know about Thomas Pringle – the abolitionist, publisher, and – some would say – Father of South African Poetry. A biography of Pringle is in order, and a reluctant writer takes up this task.

To help tell the story of Pringle is the spectre of Mary Prince, a West Indian slave whose history he had once published. Also offering advice is the ghost of Hinza Marossi, Pringle’s adopted Khoesan son, and the timetraveller Sir Nicholas Greene, a character exhumed from the pages of a book.

While Mary is breathing fire and Sir Nicholas’s heart is pining, Hinza is interrogating his origins. But what is to be made of the life of Pringle so many years after his death by this motley crew from the 1800s?

As the apparitions flit through time and space to put together the pieces of Pringle’s story and find their own place in his biography, Zoë Wicomb’s novel offers an acerbic exploration of colonial history in superb prose and with piercing wit.

You Can't Get Lost In Cape Town  (Paperback): A. van der Merwe You Can't Get Lost In Cape Town (Paperback)
A. van der Merwe; Zoe Wicomb 1
R270 R216 Discovery Miles 2 160 Save R54 (20%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

Never before published in South Africa, the ten interconnected stories of You Can’t Get Lost In Cape Town - presented here in a slightly revised edition - comprise one of the most distinguished works of South African literature. The book portrays a young coloured woman’s coming of age in apartheid South Africa, spanning the mid-1950s to the mid-1980s. The stories reflect the search of many coloured South Africans for identity in a harshly hierarchical society where white was held above coloured and coloured above black.

In a timeless narrative constructed of vivid episodes that span almost thirty years in the protagonist’s life, the book details Frieda Shenton’s coming of age as a woman; and as a writer. In telling Frieda’s story, Zoë Wicomb explores class, race, gender and culture.

It is only as Frieda finds the courage to tell her “terrible stories” - working through her tangled feelings for her family, her heritage, her country and her art - that she can at last begin to create her own place in a world where she has always felt herself an exile.

Still Life - A Novel (Hardcover): Zoe Wicomb Still Life - A Novel (Hardcover)
Zoe Wicomb
R425 Discovery Miles 4 250 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

A New York Times Top Historical Fiction Pick of 2020 A stunningly original new novel exploring race, truth in authorship, and the legacy of past exploitation, from the Windham-Campbell lifetime achievement award winner When Zoeml; Wicomb burst onto the literary scene in 1987 with You Can't Get Lost in Cape Town, she was hailed by her literary contemporaries and reviewers alike. Since then, her carefully textured writing has cemented her reputation as being among the most distinguished writers working today and earned her one of the inaugural Windham Campbell Prizes for Lifetime Achievement in Fiction Writing. Wicomb's majestic new novel Still Life juggles with our perception of time and reality as Wicomb tells the story of an author struggling to write a biography of long-forgotten Scottish poet Thomas Pringle, whose only legacy is in South Africa where he is dubbed the "Father of South African Poetry." In her efforts to resurrect Pringle, the writer summons the specter of Mary Prince, the West Indian slave whose History Pringle had once published, along with Hinza, his adopted black South African son. At their side is Sir Nicholas Green, a seasoned time traveler (and a character from Virginia Woolf's Orlando). Their adventures, as they travel across space and time to unlock the mysteries of Pringle's life, offer a poignant exploration of colonial history and racial oppression.

October (Hardcover): Zoe Wicomb October (Hardcover)
Zoe Wicomb 1
Sold By Readers Warehouse - Fulfilled by Loot
R240 R109 Discovery Miles 1 090 Save R131 (55%) Ships in 7 - 10 working days

A letter from her brother Jake calls Mercia back to Kliprand, the parched dorp she left for a life in Scotland years ago. Had she not been abandoned by her partner of twenty-four years, Mercia might never have returned to Namaqualand and its reminders of Meester – her stern and unforgiving father. In Kliprand, she finds a broken Jake who has turned his back on his young son, wanting her to remove the boy to Scotland. But what secrets haunt this family, and what sense is there to make of this thorny place called home? Zoe Wicombs October is a moving family history and an incisive commentary on what it means to belong.

October - A Novel (Hardcover): Zoe Wicomb October - A Novel (Hardcover)
Zoe Wicomb
R557 R399 Discovery Miles 3 990 Save R158 (28%) Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Abandoned by her partner in Scotland, where she has been living for 25 years, Mercia returns to her homeland of South Africa to find her family overwhelmed by alcoholism and secrets. Poised between her life in Scotland and her life in South Africa, she recollects the past with a keen sense of irony as she searches for some idea of home. With this pitch-perfect story, the writer of rare brilliance' (The Scotsman) Zoe Wicomb stands to claim her rightful place as one of the pre-eminent contemporary voices in international fiction.'

Race, Nation, Translation - South African Essays, 1990-2013 (Hardcover): Zoe Wicomb Race, Nation, Translation - South African Essays, 1990-2013 (Hardcover)
Zoe Wicomb; Edited by Andrew Van Der Vlies
R698 Discovery Miles 6 980 Ships in 10 - 20 working days

The first collection of nonfiction critical writings by one of the leading literary figures of post-apartheid South Africa The most significant nonfiction writings of Zoe Wicomb, one of South Africa's leading authors and intellectuals, are collected here for the first time in a single volume. This compilation features essays on the works of such prominent South African writers as Bessie Head, Nadine Gordimer, Njabulo Ndebele, and J. M. Coetzee, as well as on a wide range of cultural and political topics, including gender politics, sexuality, race, identity, nationalism, and visual art. Also presented here are a reflection on Nelson Mandela and a revealing interview with Wicomb. In these essays, written between 1990 and 2013, Wicomb offers insights into her nation's history, politics, and people. In a world in which nationalist rhetoric is on the rise and right-wing populist movements are the declared enemies of diversity and pluralism, her essays speak powerfully to a host of current international issues.

You Can't Get Lost in Cape Town (Hardcover): Zoe Wicomb You Can't Get Lost in Cape Town (Hardcover)
Zoe Wicomb; Afterword by Carol Sicherman
R900 Discovery Miles 9 000 Out of stock

Zoe Wicomb's complex and deeply evocative fiction is among the most distinguished recent works of South African women's literature. It is also among the only works of fiction to explore the experience of "Coloured" citizens in apartheid-era South Africa, whose mixed heritage traps them, as Bharati Mukherjee wrote in the New York Times, "in the racial crucible of their country.

"Wicomb deserves a wide American audience, on a part with Nadine Gordimer and J.M.Coetzee." - "Wall St. Journal"

Wicomb is a gifted writer, and her compressed narratives work like brilliant splinters in the mind, suggesting a rich rhythm and shape."-"Seattle Times"

" Wicomb's] prose is vigorous, textured, lyrical. . . . She] is a sophisticated storyteller who combines the open-endedness of contemporary fiction with the force of autobiography and the simplicity of family stories."-Bharati Mukherjee, "New York Times Book Review"

For course use in: African literature, African studies, growing up female, world literature, women's studies

Zoe Wicomb was born in 1948 and raised in Namaquland, South Africa. After 20 years voluntary exile, she returned to South Africa in 1991 to teach at the University of the Western Cape. She currently lives in Glasgow and teaches at the University of Strathclyde, Scotland. Marcia Wright is professor of history at Columbia University and a member of the executive committee for the Women Writing Africa series. Carol Sicherman is professor emerita of English at Lehman College, CUNY.

October (MP3 format, CD): Zoe Wicomb October (MP3 format, CD)
Zoe Wicomb; Read by Lisette Lecat
R197 R154 Discovery Miles 1 540 Save R43 (22%) Out of stock
David's Story (Paperback, New ed): Zoe Wicomb David's Story (Paperback, New ed)
Zoe Wicomb
R413 Discovery Miles 4 130 Out of stock

Unfolding in South Africa, at the moment of Nelson Mandela's release from prison in 1991, this novel explores the life and vision of a male activist through the pen of a female narrator. David Dirkse is part of the underground world of activists, spies and saboteurs in the liberation movement -- a world seldom revealed to outsiders. With 'time to think' after the unbanning of the movement, David is researching his roots in history of the mixed-race 'Coloured' people of South Africa and of their antecedents among the indigenous people and early colonial settlers. Provides compelling history that is vividly personal, through the powerful filter of storytelling. Through voices that weave together -- responding to, illuminating, and sometimes contradicting one another -- Wicomb depicts a world where 'truth upon conflicting truth wriggles into shape'. The dramatic and violent turns at the close of the novel further testify to the complexity of truth -- and of telling.

You Can't Get Lost in Cape Town (Paperback, Feminist Press ed): Zoe Wicomb You Can't Get Lost in Cape Town (Paperback, Feminist Press ed)
Zoe Wicomb 1
R359 R299 Discovery Miles 2 990 Save R60 (17%) Out of stock

Zo Wicomb's complex and deeply evocative fiction is among the most distinguished recent works of South African women's literature. It is also among the only works of fiction to explore the experience of Coloured citizens in apartheid-era South Africa, whose mixed heritage traps them, as Bharati Mukherjee wrote in the New York Times, in the racial crucible of their country. Wicomb deserves a wide American audience, on a part with Nadine Gordimer and J.M.Coetzee. - Wall St. Journal Wicomb is a gifted writer, and her compressed narratives work like brilliant splinters in the mind, suggesting a rich rhythm and shape.-Seattle Times Wicomb's] prose is vigorous, textured, lyrical. . . . She] is a sophisticated storyteller who combines the open-endedness of contemporary fiction with the force of autobiography and the simplicity of family stories.-Bharati Mukherjee, New York Times Book Review For course use in: African literature, African studies, growing up female, world literature, women's studies Zoe Wicomb was born in 1948 and raised in Namaquland, South Africa. After 20 years voluntary exile, she returned to South Africa in 1991 to teach at the University of the Western Cape. She currently lives in Glasgow and teaches at the University of Strathclyde, Scotland. Marcia Wright is professor of history at Columbia University and a member of the executive committee for the Women Writing Africa series. Carol Sicherman is professor emerita of English at Lehman College, CUNY.

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