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Jewish Families - Volume 4 (Hardcover, New): Jonathan Boyarin Jewish Families - Volume 4 (Hardcover, New)
Jonathan Boyarin
R2,667 Discovery Miles 26 670 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

From stories of biblical patriarchs and matriarchs and their children, through the Gospel's Holy Family of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, and to modern Jewish families in fiction, film, and everyday life, the family has been considered key to transmitting Jewish identity. Current discussions about the Jewish family's supposed traditional character and its alleged contemporary crisis tend to assume that the dynamics of Jewish family life have remained constant from the days of Abraham and Sarah to those of Tevye and Golde in Fiddler on the Roof and on to Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint. Jonathan Boyarin explores a wide range of scholarship in Jewish studies to argue instead that Jewish family forms and ideologies have varied greatly throughout the times and places where Jewish families have found themselves. He considers a range of family configurations from biblical times to the twenty-first century, including strictly Orthodox communities and new forms of family, including same-sex parents. The book shows the vast canvas of history and culture as well as the social pressures and strategies that have helped shape Jewish families, and suggests productive ways to think about possible futures for Jewish family forms.

The Unconverted Self - Jews, Indians, and the Identity of Christian Europe (Hardcover): Jonathan Boyarin The Unconverted Self - Jews, Indians, and the Identity of Christian Europe (Hardcover)
Jonathan Boyarin
R911 Discovery Miles 9 110 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Europe's formative encounter with its "others" is still widely assumed to have come with its discovery of the peoples of the New World. But, as Jonathan Boyarin argues, long before 1492 Christian Europe imagined itself in distinction to the Jewish difference within. The presence and image of Jews in Europe afforded the Christian majority a foil against which it could refine and maintain its own identity. In fundamental ways this experience, along with the ongoing contest between Christianity and Islam, shaped the rhetoric, attitudes, and policies of Christian colonizers in the New World.

"The Unconverted Self" proposes that questions of difference inside Christian Europe not only are inseparable from the painful legacy of colonialism but also reveal Christian domination to be a fragile construct. Boyarin compares the Christian efforts aimed toward European Jews and toward indigenous peoples of the New World, bringing into focus the intersection of colonial expansion with the Inquisition and adding significant nuance to the entire question of the colonial encounter.

Revealing the crucial tension between the Jews as "others within" and the Indians as "others without," "The Unconverted Self" is a major reassessment of early modern European identity.

Palestine and Jewish History - Criticism at the Borders of Ethnography (Paperback): Jonathan Boyarin Palestine and Jewish History - Criticism at the Borders of Ethnography (Paperback)
Jonathan Boyarin
R1,208 Discovery Miles 12 080 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

"Palestine and Jewish History " was first published in 1996. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

This provocative and personal series of meditations on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict argues that it represents a struggle not as much about land and history as about space, time, and memory. Juxtaposing entries from Jonathan Boyarin's field diary with critical and theoretical articulations, Palestine and Jewish History shows not only the unfinished nature of anthropological endeavor, but also the author's personal stake in the ethical predicament of being a Jew at this point in history.

Boyarin comes to Israel as a specialist in modern Jewish studies, an individual who has kin, friends, and colleagues there, a scholar with a long history of peace activism. He interweaves fascinating descriptions of ordinary life-parties, walks, classes, visits to homes-with a selection of his related writings on cultural studies and anthropology. Some sections are polemical; others are witty analyses of bumper stickers, slogans, the ambiguities in conversations. Boyarin foregrounds the messiness and lack of closure inherent in this process, presenting "raw materials" (field notes) in some sections of the book that reappear in other sections as various kinds of "finished" products (conference papers, published articles).

In the process, we learn a good deal about the Middle East and its debates and connections to other places. Boyarin addresses two fundamental issues: the difficulty of linking different sorts of memories and memorializations, and the importance of moving beyond objectivity and multiculturalism into a situated, engaged, and nontotalizing framework for fieldwork and ethnography.

Palestine and Jewish History enacts rather than reports on Boyarin's process of error, pain, impatience, uncertainty, discovery, embarrassment, self-criticism, intellectual struggle, and dawning awareness, challenging and engaging us in the process of discovery. Ultimately, it gives the lie, as the Palestinian presence does in Israel, to any concept of a "finishedness" that successfully conceals its unruly and painful multiple processes.

Jonathan Boyarin is the Leonard and Tobee Kaplan Distinguished Professor of Modern Jewish Thought in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of "Storm from Paradise," co-author of "Powers of Diaspora," and the co-editor of "Remapping Memory" and "Jews and Other Differences," all available from Minnesota.

Storm from Paradise - Politics of Jewish Memory (Paperback): Jonathan Boyarin Storm from Paradise - Politics of Jewish Memory (Paperback)
Jonathan Boyarin
R972 Discovery Miles 9 720 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

"Storm from Paradise "was first published in 1992. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

"Usefully complicating common sense understandings of history, catastrophe, loss, otherness, and possibility through reflections on contemporary Jewishness, Boyarin draws on Benjamins's famous image of the Angel of History blown into the future by a "storm from paradise" to constantly interrogate and recuperate the past, "without pretending for long that we can recoup its plentitude." The book's seven thoughtful essays are at times deliberately intangible but always worth reading. An important book for the rethinking of the relevance of Jewishness to anthropology and cultural studies." -"Religious Studies Review"

"An essay in the richest sense of that term, inspired by and modeled on Walter Benjamin's essays. Based on varied, diverse, and abundantly cross-disciplinary readings, it moves and builds, questions and interrogates, and ultimately convinces us that the Jewish experience with being the 'other' and, conversely and recently, with 'othering' is indeed relevant to theorists of contemporary culture." -Marianne Hirsch

Jonathan Boyarin is the author of "Palestine and Jewish History," and co-editor, with Daniel Boyarin, of "Jews and Other Differences" and "Powers of Diaspora."

Jewish Families - Volume 4 (Paperback, New): Jonathan Boyarin Jewish Families - Volume 4 (Paperback, New)
Jonathan Boyarin
R702 R641 Discovery Miles 6 410 Save R61 (9%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

From stories of biblical patriarchs and matriarchs and their children, through the Gospel's Holy Family of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, and to modern Jewish families in fiction, film, and everyday life, the family has been considered key to transmitting Jewish identity. Current discussions about the Jewish family's supposed traditional character and its alleged contemporary crisis tend to assume that the dynamics of Jewish family life have remained constant from the days of Abraham and Sarah to those of Tevye and Golde in Fiddler on the Roof and on to Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint. Jonathan Boyarin explores a wide range of scholarship in Jewish studies to argue instead that Jewish family forms and ideologies have varied greatly throughout the times and places where Jewish families have found themselves. He considers a range of family configurations from biblical times to the twenty-first century, including strictly Orthodox communities and new forms of family, including same-sex parents. The book shows the vast canvas of history and culture as well as the social pressures and strategies that have helped shape Jewish families, and suggests productive ways to think about possible futures for Jewish family forms.

Yeshiva Days - Learning on the Lower East Side (Paperback): Jonathan Boyarin Yeshiva Days - Learning on the Lower East Side (Paperback)
Jonathan Boyarin
R513 Discovery Miles 5 130 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

An intimate and moving portrait of daily life in New York's oldest institution of traditional rabbinic learning New York City's Lower East Side has witnessed a severe decline in its Jewish population in recent decades, yet every morning in the big room of the city's oldest yeshiva, students still gather to study the Talmud beneath the great arched windows facing out onto East Broadway. Yeshiva Days is Jonathan Boyarin's uniquely personal account of the year he spent as both student and observer at Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem, and a poignant chronicle of a side of Jewish life that outsiders rarely see. Boyarin explores the yeshiva's relationship with the neighborhood, the city, and Jewish and American culture more broadly, and brings vividly to life its routines, rituals, and rhythms. He describes the compelling and often colorful personalities he encounters each day, and introduces readers to the Rosh Yeshiva, or Rebbi, the moral and intellectual head of the yeshiva. Boyarin reflects on the tantalizing meanings of "study for its own sake" in the intellectually vibrant world of traditional rabbinic learning, and records his fellow students' responses to his negotiation of the daily complexities of yeshiva life while he also conducts anthropological fieldwork. A richly mature work by a writer of uncommon insight, wit, and honesty, Yeshiva Days is the story of a place on the Lower East Side with its own distinctive heritage and character, a meditation on the enduring power of Jewish tradition and learning, and a record of a different way of engaging with time and otherness.

Remapping Memory - The Politics of Timespace (Paperback): Charles Tilly Remapping Memory - The Politics of Timespace (Paperback)
Charles Tilly; Edited by Jonathan Boyarin
R1,093 R884 Discovery Miles 8 840 Save R209 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

"Remapping Memory "was first published in 1994. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

The essays in this book focus on contested memories in relation to time and space. Within the context of several profound cultural and political conflicts in the contemporary world, the contributors analyze historical self-configurations of human groups, and the construction by these groups of the spaces they shape and that shape them. What emerges is a view of the state as a highly contingent artifact of groups vying for legitimacy-whether through their own sense of "insiderhood," their control of positions within hierarchies, or their control of geographical territories.

Boyarin's lead essay shows how the supposedly "objective" categories of space and time are, in fact, specific products of European modernity. Each case study, in turn, addresses the (re)constitution of space, time, and memory in relation to an event either of historical significance, like the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, or of cultural importance, like the Indian preoccupation with reincarnation. These ethnographic studies explore fundamental questions about the nature of memory, the limits of politics, and the complex links between them.

By focusing on personal and collective identity as the site where constructions of memory and dimensionality are tested, shaped, and effected, the authors offer a new way of understanding how the politics of space, time and memory are negotiated to bring people to terms with their history.

Contributors: Akhil Gupta, Stanford University; Charles R. Hale, University of California, Davis; Carina Perelli, PEITHO, Montevideo, Uruguay; Jennifer Schirmer, Center for European Studies, Harvard; Daniel A. Segal, Pitzer College, Claremont, California; Lisa Yoneyama, University of California, San Diego.

Yeshiva Days - Learning on the Lower East Side (Hardcover): Jonathan Boyarin Yeshiva Days - Learning on the Lower East Side (Hardcover)
Jonathan Boyarin
R1,651 R1,442 Discovery Miles 14 420 Save R209 (13%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

An intimate and moving portrait of daily life in New York's oldest institution of traditional rabbinic learning New York City's Lower East Side has witnessed a severe decline in its Jewish population in recent decades, yet every morning in the big room of the city's oldest yeshiva, students still gather to study the Talmud beneath the great arched windows facing out onto East Broadway. Yeshiva Days is Jonathan Boyarin's uniquely personal account of the year he spent as both student and observer at Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem, and a poignant chronicle of a side of Jewish life that outsiders rarely see. Boyarin explores the yeshiva's relationship with the neighborhood, the city, and Jewish and American culture more broadly, and brings vividly to life its routines, rituals, and rhythms. He describes the compelling and often colorful personalities he encounters each day, and introduces readers to the Rosh Yeshiva, or Rebbi, the moral and intellectual head of the yeshiva. Boyarin reflects on the tantalizing meanings of "study for its own sake" in the intellectually vibrant world of traditional rabbinic learning, and records his fellow students' responses to his negotiation of the daily complexities of yeshiva life while he also conducts anthropological fieldwork. A richly mature work by a writer of uncommon insight, wit, and honesty, Yeshiva Days is the story of a place on the Lower East Side with its own distinctive heritage and character, a meditation on the enduring power of Jewish tradition and learning, and a record of a different way of engaging with time and otherness.

Jews and the Ends of Theory (Paperback): Shai Ginsburg, Martin Land, Jonathan Boyarin Jews and the Ends of Theory (Paperback)
Shai Ginsburg, Martin Land, Jonathan Boyarin; Contributions by Svetlana Boym, Sergey Dolgopolski, …
R727 R614 Discovery Miles 6 140 Save R113 (16%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Theory, as it's happened across the humanities, has often been coded as "Jewish." This collection of essays seeks to move past explanations for this understanding that rely on the self-evident (the historical centrality of Jews to the rise of Critical Theory with the Frankfurt School) or stereotypical (psychoanalysis as the "Jewish Science") in order to show how certain problematics of modern Jewishness enrich theory. In the range of violence and agency that attend the appellation "Jew," depending on how, where, and by whom it's uttered, we can see that Jewishness is a rhetorical as much as a sociological fact, and that its rhetorical and sociological aspects, while linked, are not identical. Attention to this disjuncture helps to elucidate the questions of power, subjectivity, identity, figuration, language, and relation that modern theory has grappled with. These questions in turn implicate geopolitical issues such as the relation of a people to a state and the violence done in the name of simplistic identitarian ideologies. Clarifying a situation where "the Jew" is not readily or unproblematically legible, the editors propose what they call "spectral reading," a way to understand Jewishness as a fluid and rhetorical presence. While not divorced from sociological facts, this spectral reading works in concert with contemporary theory to mediate pessimistic and utopian impulses, experiences, and realities. Contributors: Svetlana Boym, Andrew Bush, Sergey Dolgopolski, Jay Geller, Sarah Hammerschlag, Hannan Hever, Martin Land, Martin Jay, James I. Porter, Yehouda Shenhav, Elliot R. Wolfson

The Lithuanian Slaughter of its Jews - The Testimonies of 121 Jewish survivors of the Holocaust in Lithuanian, recorded by Leyb... The Lithuanian Slaughter of its Jews - The Testimonies of 121 Jewish survivors of the Holocaust in Lithuanian, recorded by Leyb Koniuchowsky, in Displaced Persons' Camps (1946-48) (Paperback)
Jonathan Boyarin; Leyb Koniuchowsky
R1,243 R1,164 Discovery Miles 11 640 Save R79 (6%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
A Fire Burns in Kotsk - A Tale of Hasidism in the Kingdom of Poland (Paperback): Menashe Unger A Fire Burns in Kotsk - A Tale of Hasidism in the Kingdom of Poland (Paperback)
Menashe Unger; Translated by Jonathan Boyarin; Introduction by Glenn Dynner
R797 Discovery Miles 7 970 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Half a century after Hasidism blossomed in Eastern Europe, its members were making deep inroads into the institutional structure of Polish Jewish communities, but some devotees believed that the movement had drifted away from its revolutionary ideals. Menashe Unger's A Fire Burns in Kotsk dramatizes this moment of division among Polish Hasidim in a historical account that reads like a novel, though the book was never billed as such. Originally published in Buenos Aires in 1949 and translated for the first time from Yiddish by Jonathan Boyarin, this volume captures an important period in the evolution of the Hasidic movement, and is itself a missing link to Hasidic oral traditions. A non-observant journalist who had grown up as the son of a prominent Hasidic rabbi, Unger incorporates stories that were told by his family into his historical account. A Fire Burns in Kotsk begins with a threat to the new, rebellious movement within Hasidism known as ""the school of Pshiskhe,"" led by the good-humored Reb Simkhe Bunim. When Bunim is succeeded by the fiery and forbidding Rebbe of Kotsk, Menachem Mendl Morgenstern, the new leader's disdain for the vast majority of his followers will lead to a crisis in his court. Around this core narrative of reform and crisis in Hasidic leadership, Unger offers a rich account of the everyday Hasidic court life-filled with plenty of alcohol, stolen geese, and wives pleading with their husbands to come back home. Unger's volume reflects a period when Eastern European Jewish immigrants enjoyed reading about Hasidic culture in Yiddish articles and books, even as they themselves were rapidly assimilating into American culture. Historians of literature, Polish culture, and Jewish studies will welcome this lively translation.

Jewishness and the Human Dimension (Paperback): Jonathan Boyarin Jewishness and the Human Dimension (Paperback)
Jonathan Boyarin
R706 R592 Discovery Miles 5 920 Save R114 (16%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Jewishness and the Human Dimension is a progress report on the effort of bringing Jewishness broadly construed into contact with broad currents of thought in contemporary criticism, while linking those themes in turn to the question of planetary crisis. All of the book's chapters emerge from and address the circumstances of their composition: an address to New Jersey undergraduates inviting them to contemplate their lifespans vis-A -vis the life history of the species and the planet; a meeting to contemplate Jewish memory out of Europe and after 1945; an inaugural address as Boyarin sought to make sense of leaving his "home" on the Lower East Side and making a new one in Kansas. Two initial chapters focus on research and teaching in Jewish cultural studies as academic practice, as they develop respectively the notion of Jewish studies as a human science, and how Jewish historiography, once a deeply conservative discipline, has integrated insights from anthropology and literary cultural studies. Toward its conclusion, the volume encompasses a dialogue with the Jerusalem-based physicist Martin Land on physical and cultural ideas of futurity and redemption. The book ends with a stark challenge to those who work in the contemporary humanities and social sciences: in order to be able to contribute toward the possibility of sustained human life on Earth, we need to interrogate rigorously the status of human differences now. Neither straight ethnography (though it relishes the particular), memoir (though a personal voice is readily audible) nor criticism (though the work and figures of Jacques Derrida and especially Walter Benjamin are indispensable to this project), this book attempts to putin place words of the late Moish Fogel, vice president of the Eighth Street Shul, that have long stood as a watchword for Boyarin's writing: "Whatever you know you gotta use!"

Jews and the Ends of Theory (Hardcover): Shai Ginsburg, Martin Land, Jonathan Boyarin Jews and the Ends of Theory (Hardcover)
Shai Ginsburg, Martin Land, Jonathan Boyarin; Contributions by Svetlana Boym, Sergey Dolgopolski, …
R2,581 R2,052 Discovery Miles 20 520 Save R529 (20%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Theory, as it's happened across the humanities, has often been coded as "Jewish." This collection of essays seeks to move past explanations for this understanding that rely on the self-evident (the historical centrality of Jews to the rise of Critical Theory with the Frankfurt School) or stereotypical (psychoanalysis as the "Jewish Science") in order to show how certain problematics of modern Jewishness enrich theory. In the range of violence and agency that attend the appellation "Jew," depending on how, where, and by whom it's uttered, we can see that Jewishness is a rhetorical as much as a sociological fact, and that its rhetorical and sociological aspects, while linked, are not identical. Attention to this disjuncture helps to elucidate the questions of power, subjectivity, identity, figuration, language, and relation that modern theory has grappled with. These questions in turn implicate geopolitical issues such as the relation of a people to a state and the violence done in the name of simplistic identitarian ideologies. Clarifying a situation where "the Jew" is not readily or unproblematically legible, the editors propose what they call "spectral reading," a way to understand Jewishness as a fluid and rhetorical presence. While not divorced from sociological facts, this spectral reading works in concert with contemporary theory to mediate pessimistic and utopian impulses, experiences, and realities. Contributors: Svetlana Boym, Andrew Bush, Sergey Dolgopolski, Jay Geller, Sarah Hammerschlag, Hannan Hever, Martin Land, Martin Jay, James I. Porter, Yehouda Shenhav, Elliot R. Wolfson

Mornings at the Stanton Street Shul - A Summer on the Lower East Side (Paperback): Jonathan Boyarin Mornings at the Stanton Street Shul - A Summer on the Lower East Side (Paperback)
Jonathan Boyarin
R469 R425 Discovery Miles 4 250 Save R44 (9%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This lively ethnography traces a fraught three months in the life of a Jewish congregation stubbornly persisting on the Lower East Side, and affords a candid, lucid and intimate introduction to contemporary synagogue practice.
In these pages Jonathan Boyarin invites us to share the intimate life of the Stanton Street Shul, one of the last remaining Jewish congregations on New York's historic Lower East Side. This narrow building, wedged into a lot designed for an old-law tenement, is full of clamorous voices the generations of the dead, who somehow contrive to make their presence known, and the newer generation, keeping the building and its memories alive and making themselves Jews in the process. Through the eyes of Boyarin, at once a member of the congregation and a bemused anthropologist, the bookfollows this congregation of "year-round Jews" through the course of a summer during which its future must once again be decided.
The Lower East Side, famous as the jumping off point for millions of Jewish and other immigrants to America, has recently become the hip playground of twenty-something immigrants to the city from elsewhere in America
and from abroad. Few imagine that Jewish life there has stubbornly continued through this history of decline and regeneration. Coming inside with Boyarin, we see the congregation's life as a combination of quiet heroism, ironic humor, disputes for the sake of Heaven and perhaps otherwise, and above all the ongoing
search for ways to connect with Jewish ancestors while remaining true to oneself in the present.
Mornings at the Stanton Street Shul illustrates in poignant and humorous ways the changes in a historic neighborhood facing the challenges of gentrification. It offers readers with no prior knowledge of Judaism and synagogue life a portrait that is at once intimate and intelligible. Most important, perhaps, it shows the congregation's members to be anything but a monochromatic set of uniform "believers" but rather a gathering of vibrant, imperfect, indisputably down-to-earth individuals coming together to make a community.

Mornings at the Stanton Street Shul - A Summer on the Lower East Side (Hardcover): Jonathan Boyarin Mornings at the Stanton Street Shul - A Summer on the Lower East Side (Hardcover)
Jonathan Boyarin
R1,765 R1,422 Discovery Miles 14 220 Save R343 (19%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This lively ethnography traces a fraught three months in the life of a Jewish congregation stubbornly persisting on the Lower East Side, and affords a candid, lucid and intimate introduction to contemporary synagogue practice.
In these pages Jonathan Boyarin invites us to share the intimate life of the Stanton Street Shul, one of the last remaining Jewish congregations on New York's historic Lower East Side. This narrow building, wedged into a lot designed for an old-law tenement, is full of clamorous voices the generations of the dead, who somehow contrive to make their presence known, and the newer generation, keeping the building and its memories alive and making themselves Jews in the process. Through the eyes of Boyarin, at once a member of the congregation and a bemused anthropologist, the bookfollows this congregation of "year-round Jews" through the course of a summer during which its future must once again be decided.
The Lower East Side, famous as the jumping off point for millions of Jewish and other immigrants to America, has recently become the hip playground of twenty-something immigrants to the city from elsewhere in America
and from abroad. Few imagine that Jewish life there has stubbornly continued through this history of decline and regeneration. Coming inside with Boyarin, we see the congregation's life as a combination of quiet heroism, ironic humor, disputes for the sake of Heaven and perhaps otherwise, and above all the ongoing
search for ways to connect with Jewish ancestors while remaining true to oneself in the present.
Mornings at the Stanton Street Shul illustrates in poignant and humorous ways the changes in a historic neighborhood facing the challenges of gentrification. It offers readers with no prior knowledge of Judaism and synagogue life a portrait that is at once intimate and intelligible. Most important, perhaps, it shows the congregation's members to be anything but a monochromatic set of uniform "believers" but rather a gathering of vibrant, imperfect, indisputably down-to-earth individuals coming together to make a community.

Jews and Other Differences - The New Jewish Cultural Studies (Paperback): Jonathan Boyarin, Daniel Boyarin Jews and Other Differences - The New Jewish Cultural Studies (Paperback)
Jonathan Boyarin, Daniel Boyarin
R582 R498 Discovery Miles 4 980 Save R84 (14%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The goal of this diverse and intriguing volu me is to shape a space of common discourse between Jews and others who share a critical apporach to the politics of cult ure and the cultural politics of difference. '

Powers Of Diaspora - Two Essays On The Relevance Of Jewish Culture (Paperback): Jonathan Boyarin, Daniel Boyarin Powers Of Diaspora - Two Essays On The Relevance Of Jewish Culture (Paperback)
Jonathan Boyarin, Daniel Boyarin
R459 R396 Discovery Miles 3 960 Save R63 (14%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days
From a Ruined Garden, Second Expanded Edition - The Memorial Books of Polish Jewry (Paperback, Second Expanded Edition): Jack... From a Ruined Garden, Second Expanded Edition - The Memorial Books of Polish Jewry (Paperback, Second Expanded Edition)
Jack Kugelmass, Jonathan Boyarin
R667 Discovery Miles 6 670 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

"An indispensable sourcebook... Emphasis falls on the variegated, often joyful, culture of the Polish Jews, on what existed before the garden was ruined." Geoffrey Hartmann, The New Republic

"From these marvelous selections, one can see an entire culture unfolding." Curt Leviant, New York Times Book Review

"This newly revised version of the classic study... is a pleasure for the eye and the soul One of the seminal studies of the impact of the Shoah on European Jewry, it is even more moving in its new incarnation than in its original version. More than a collection of studies of books of remembrance and mourning, this volume asks how one can mourn for a world lost and still live in the present and the future." Sander L. Gilman

"Kugelmass and Boyarin have done a splendid job of combing the vast memorial book literature to select the most revealing accounts of Jewish life in interbellum Poland. Ordinary people speak in this volume with an immediacy and poignancy that cannot help but touch the reader. In the time since it first appeared, From a Ruined Garden has become a classic. Its reappearance in an updated and expanded form is most welcome." Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett

"In this magnificent collection, the editors combine a profound feel for the vanished world of Polish Jewry, the anthologist s skill at selecting the telling example, and the anthropologist s sophisticated understanding of how these testimonies should be read. A marvelous introduction to this rich literature." Peter Novick

Polish Jewish survivors of the Holocaust compiled memorial books to preserve the memory of their destroyed communities. They describe daily life in the shtetl as well as everyday life during the Holocaust and the experiences of returning survivors. These memories paint a haunting picture of a way of life lost forever."

The Ethnography of Reading (Paperback, New ed): Jonathan Boyarin The Ethnography of Reading (Paperback, New ed)
Jonathan Boyarin
R773 Discovery Miles 7 730 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Writing, the subject of much innovative scholarship in recent years, is only half of what we call literacy. The other half, reading, now finally receives its due in these groundbreaking essays by a distinguished group of anthropologists and literary scholars.
The essays move well beyond the simple rubric of "literacy" in its traditional sense of evolutionary advancement from oral to written communication. Some investigate reading in exotically cross-cultural contexts. Some analyze the long historical transformation of reading in the West from a collective, oral practice to the private, silent one it is today, while others demonstrate that in certain Western contexts reading is still very much a social activity. The reading situations described here range from Anglo-Saxon England to contemporary Indonesia, from ancient Israel to a Kashaya Pomo Indian reservation.
Filled with insights that erase the line between orality and textuality, this collection will attract a broad readership in anthropology, literature, history, and philosophy, as well as in religious, gender, and cultural studies.

Time and Human Language Now (Paperback): Jonathan Boyarin, Martin Land Time and Human Language Now (Paperback)
Jonathan Boyarin, Martin Land
R254 R236 Discovery Miles 2 360 Save R18 (7%) Out of stock

What can you say after you say that the world - or at least human life on it - looks like it's nearing its end? How about starting with wonder at the possibility that dialogue and subjectivity, the bases of human language, are possible now? In "Time and Human Language Now", two lifelong friends share, in the form of a long-distance e-mail correspondence, a conversation about the relation between cosmos and consciousness, and about the possibility of being responsibly open toward the future without either despair or unreasoning hope. The urgency that underlies this dialogue is the conviction that there can only be reason for hope if the members of homo sapiens can learn - soon - how vital and astonishing is the phenomenon of shared human presence through language.

Powers Of Diaspora - Two Essays On The Relevance Of Jewish Culture (Hardcover): Jonathan Boyarin, Daniel Boyarin Powers Of Diaspora - Two Essays On The Relevance Of Jewish Culture (Hardcover)
Jonathan Boyarin, Daniel Boyarin
R1,121 Discovery Miles 11 210 Out of stock
Jewishness and the Human Dimension (Hardcover): Jonathan Boyarin Jewishness and the Human Dimension (Hardcover)
Jonathan Boyarin
R1,539 Discovery Miles 15 390 Out of stock

Jewishness and the Human Dimension is a progress report on the effort of bringing Jewishness broadly construed into contact with broad currents of thought in contemporary criticism, while linking those themes in turn to the question of planetary crisis. All of the book's chapters emerge from and address the circumstances of their composition: an address to New Jersey undergraduates inviting them to contemplate their lifespans vis-A -vis the life history of the species and the planet; a meeting to contemplate Jewish memory out of Europe and after 1945; an inaugural address as Boyarin sought to make sense of leaving his "home" on the Lower East Side and making a new one in Kansas. Two initial chapters focus on research and teaching in Jewish cultural studies as academic practice, as they develop respectively the notion of Jewish studies as a human science, and how Jewish historiography, once a deeply conservative discipline, has integrated insights from anthropology and literary cultural studies. Toward its conclusion, the volume encompasses a dialogue with the Jerusalem-based physicist Martin Land on physical and cultural ideas of futurity and redemption. The book ends with a stark challenge to those who work in the contemporary humanities and social sciences: in order to be able to contribute toward the possibility of sustained human life on Earth, we need to interrogate rigorously the status of human differences now. Neither straight ethnography (though it relishes the particular), memoir (though a personal voice is readily audible) nor criticism (though the work and figures of Jacques Derrida and especially Walter Benjamin are indispensable to this project), this book attempts to putin place words of the late Moish Fogel, vice president of the Eighth Street Shul, that have long stood as a watchword for Boyarin's writing: "Whatever you know you gotta use!"

The Ethnography of Reading (Hardcover): Jonathan Boyarin The Ethnography of Reading (Hardcover)
Jonathan Boyarin
R1,657 R1,240 Discovery Miles 12 400 Save R417 (25%) Out of stock

Writing, the subject of much innovative scholarship in recent years, is only half of what we call literacy. The other half, reading, now finally receives its due in these groundbreaking essays by a distinguished group of anthropologists and literary scholars.
The essays move well beyond the simple rubric of "literacy" in its traditional sense of evolutionary advancement from oral to written communication. Some investigate reading in exotically cross-cultural contexts. Some analyze the long historical transformation of reading in the West from a collective, oral practice to the private, silent one it is today, while others demonstrate that in certain Western contexts reading is still very much a social activity. The reading situations described here range from Anglo-Saxon England to contemporary Indonesia, from ancient Israel to a Kashaya Pomo Indian reservation.
Filled with insights that erase the line between orality and textuality, this collection will attract a broad readership in anthropology, literature, history, and philosophy, as well as in religious, gender, and cultural studies.

Thinking in Jewish (Hardcover, New): Jonathan Boyarin Thinking in Jewish (Hardcover, New)
Jonathan Boyarin
R1,779 Discovery Miles 17 790 Out of stock

How does one "think" in Jewish? What does it mean to speak in English of Yiddish as Jewish, as a certain intermediary generation of immigrants and children of immigrants from Jewish Eastern Europe has done? A fascination with this question prompted Jonathan Boyarin, a thinker in critical theory and Jewish ethnography, to offer the Jewish perspective on the vexed issue of identity politics presented here. Boyarin's essays explore the ways in which a Jewish - or, more particularly, Yiddish - idiom complicates the question of identity. Ranging from explorations of a Lower East Side synagogue to Fichte's and Derrida's contrasting notions of the relation between the Jews and the idea of Europe, from the Lubavitch Hasidim to accounts of self-making by Judith Butler and Charles Taylor, "Thinking in Jewish" is intended for students of critical theory, cultural studies and Jewish studies. Jonathan Boyarin is the author of "Storm from Paradise: The Politics of Jewish Memory" and is the editor of "The Ethnography of Reading and Remapping Memory: The Politics of TimeSpace"

Thinking in Jewish (Paperback, New): Jonathan Boyarin Thinking in Jewish (Paperback, New)
Jonathan Boyarin
R742 Discovery Miles 7 420 Out of stock

How does one "think" in Jewish? What does it mean to speak in English of Yiddish as Jewish, as a certain intermediary generation of immigrants and children of immigrants from Jewish Eastern Europe has done? A fascination with this question prompted Jonathan Boyarin, a thinker in critical theory and Jewish ethnography, to offer the Jewish perspective on the vexed issue of identity politics presented here. Boyarin's essays explore the ways in which a Jewish - or, more particularly, Yiddish - idiom complicates the question of identity. Ranging from explorations of a Lower East Side synagogue to Fichte's and Derrida's contrasting notions of the relation between the Jews and the idea of Europe, from the Lubavitch Hasidim to accounts of self-making by Judith Butler and Charles Taylor, "Thinking in Jewish" is intended for students of critical theory, cultural studies and Jewish studies. Jonathan Boyarin is the author of "Storm from Paradise: The Politics of Jewish Memory" and is the editor of "The Ethnography of Reading and Remapping Memory: The Politics of TimeSpace"

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