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Books > Social sciences > Politics & government > Political control & freedoms > Human rights > Land rights

Rights To Land - A Guide To Tenure Upgrading And Restitution In South Africa (Paperback): William Beinart, Peter Delius,... Rights To Land - A Guide To Tenure Upgrading And Restitution In South Africa (Paperback)
William Beinart, Peter Delius, Michelle Hay 1
R225 R194 Discovery Miles 1 940 Save R31 (14%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

The issue of land rights is an ongoing and complex topic of debate for South Africans. Rights to Land comes at a time when land redistribution by government is underway. This book seeks to understand the issues around land rights and distribution of land in South Africa and proposes that new policies and processes should be developed and adopted. It further provides an analysis of what went so wrong, and warns that a new phase of restitution may ignite conflicting ethnic claims and facilitate elite capture of land and rural resources.

While there are no quick fixes, the first phase of restitution should be completed and the policy then curtailed. The book argues that land ownership and administration is important to rural democracy and that this should not be placed under the control of traditionalist intermediaries. Land restitution, initiated in 1994, was an important response to the injustices of the apartheid era. But it was intended as a limited and short-term process – initially to be completed in five years.

It may continue for decades, creating uncertainty and undermining investment into agriculture.

The Book of Trespass - Crossing the Lines that Divide Us (Paperback): Nick Hayes The Book of Trespass - Crossing the Lines that Divide Us (Paperback)
Nick Hayes
R270 R229 Discovery Miles 2 290 Save R41 (15%) Ships in 10 - 20 working days

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER 'Brilliant, passionate and political . . . The Book of Trespass will make you see landscapes differently' Robert Macfarlane 'A remarkable and truly radical work, loaded with resonant truths' George Monbiot The vast majority of our country is entirely unknown to us because we are banned from setting foot on it. By law of trespass, we are excluded from 92 per cent of the land and 97 per cent of its waterways, blocked by walls whose legitimacy is rarely questioned. But behind them lies a story of enclosure, exploitation and dispossession of public rights whose effects last to this day. The Book of Trespass takes us on a journey over the walls of England, into the thousands of square miles of rivers, woodland, lakes and meadows that are blocked from public access. By trespassing the land of the media magnates, Lords, politicians and private corporations that own England, Nick Hayes argues that the root of social inequality is the uneven distribution of land. Weaving together the stories of poachers, vagabonds, gypsies, witches, hippies, ravers, ramblers, migrants and protestors, and charting acts of civil disobedience that challenge orthodox power at its heart, The Book of Trespass will transform the way you see the land.

Jerusalem - The Contested City (Hardcover): Menachem Klein Jerusalem - The Contested City (Hardcover)
Menachem Klein; As told to Haim Watzmanv
R1,994 Discovery Miles 19 940 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

"Klein's excellent survey of these realities and dynamics will remain an important brief for decision-makers in the future."--"The Journal of Israeli History"

"A book of considerable weight and an important contribution to the growing genre of political studies in Jerusalem."
-- Michael Dumper," Journal of Palestine Studies"

Jerusalem, which means "city of peace," is one of the most bitterly contested territories on earth. Claimed by two peoples and sacred to three faiths, for the last three decades the city has been associated with violent struggle and civil unrest. As the peace negotiations between the Palestinians and Israelis reach their conclusion, the final, and most difficult issue is the status of Jerusalem. How and to what extent will these two nations share this city? How will Christians, Muslims and Jews in Jerusalem and around the world redefine their relationship to Jerusalem when the dust settles on the final agreement? Will the Israelis and Palestinians even be able to reach an agreement at all?

Menachem Klein, one of the leading experts on the history and politics of Jerusalem, cuts through the rhetoric on all sides to explain the actual policies of the Israelis and Palestinians toward the city. He describes the "facts on the ground" that make their competing claims so fraught with tension and difficult to reconcile. He shows how Palestinian national institutions have operated clandestinely since the Israelis occupied the eastern half of the city, and how the Israelis have tried to suppress them. Ultimately, he points the way toward a compromise solution but insists that the struggle for power and cultural recognition will likely continue to be apermanent feature of life in this complicated, multi-cultural city.

The Land Wars - The Dispossession Of The Khoisan And AmaXhosa In The Cape Colony (Paperback): John Laband The Land Wars - The Dispossession Of The Khoisan And AmaXhosa In The Cape Colony (Paperback)
John Laband 1
R320 R256 Discovery Miles 2 560 Save R64 (20%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

Perhaps the most explosive issue in South Africa today is the question of land ownership. The central theme in this country’s colonial history is the dispossession of indigenous African societies by white settlers, and current calls for land restitution are based on this loss. Yet popular knowledge of the actual process by which Africans were deprived of their land is remarkably sketchy.

This book recounts an important part of this history, describing how the Khoisan and Xhosa people were dispossessed and subjugated from the time that Europeans first arrived until the end of the Cape Frontier Wars (1779–1878).

The Land Wars traces the unfolding hostilities involving Dutch and British colonial authorities, trekboers and settlers, and the San, Khoikhoin, Xhosa, Mfengu and Thembu people – as well as conflicts within these groups. In the process it describes the loss of land by Africans to successive waves of white settlers as the colonial frontier inexorably advanced. The book does not shy away from controversial issues such as war atrocities on both sides, or the expedient decision of some of the indigenous peoples to fight alongside the colonisers rather than against them.

The Land Wars is an epic story, featuring well-known figures such as Ngqika, Lord Charles Somerset and his son, Henry, Andries Stockenström, Hintsa, Harry Smith, Sandile, Maqoma, Bartle Frere and Sarhili, and events such as the arrival of the 1820 Settlers and the Xhosa cattlekilling. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand South Africa’s past and present.

Second Nature - The History and Implications of Australia as Aboriginal Landscape (Hardcover, 1st ed): Lesley Head Second Nature - The History and Implications of Australia as Aboriginal Landscape (Hardcover, 1st ed)
Lesley Head
R788 R627 Discovery Miles 6 270 Save R161 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This text examines the role of Australia's Aboriginal people in modern society. It considers the implications and ramifications that the 1992 ruling, which recognized the Aboriginal people as the original owners of the land, will have on the rights to which Aboriginal people are entitled.

Landmarked (Paperback): Cheryl Walker Landmarked (Paperback)
Cheryl Walker
R260 R224 Discovery Miles 2 240 Save R36 (14%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

The year 2008 is the deadline set by President Mbeki for the finalization of all land claims by people who were dispossessed under the apartheid and previous white governments. Although most experts agree this is an impossible deadline, it does provide a significant political moment for reflection on the ANC government's program of land restitution since the end of apartheid.
Land reform (and land restitution within that) remains a highly charged issue in South Africa, one that deserves more in-depth analysis. Drawing on her experience as Rural Land Claims Commissioner in KwaZulu-Natal from 1995 to 2000, Professor Cherryl Walker provides a multilayered account of land reform in South Africa, one that covers general critical commentary, detailed case material, and personal narrative. She explores the master narrative of loss and restoration, which has been fundamental in shaping the restitution program; offers a critical overview of the achievements of the program as a whole; and discusses what she calls the "non-programmatic limits to land reform," including urbanization, environmental constraints and the impact of HIV/AIDS.

Land and Revolution in Iran, 1960-1980 (Paperback): Eric J. Hooglund Land and Revolution in Iran, 1960-1980 (Paperback)
Eric J. Hooglund
R486 Discovery Miles 4 860 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Carried out by the government of the shah between 1962 and 1971, the Iranian land reform was one of the most ambitious such undertakings in modern Middle Eastern history. Yet, beneath apparent statistical success, the actual accomplishments of the program, in terms of positive benefits for the peasantry, were negligible. Later, the resulting widespread discontent of thousands of Iranian villagers would contribute to the shah's downfall. In the first major study of the effects of this widely publicized program, Eric Hooglund's analysis demonstrates that the primary motives behind the land reform were political. Attempting to supplant the near-absolute authority of the landlord class over the countryside, the central government hoped to extend its own authority throughout rural Iran. While the Pahlavi government accomplished this goal, its failure to implement effective structural reform proved to be a long-term liability. Hooglund, who conducted field research in rural Iran throughout the 1970s and who witnessed the unfolding of the revolution from a small village, provides a careful description of the development of the land reform and of its effects on the main groups involved: landlords, peasants, local officials, merchants, and brokers. He shows how the continuing poverty in the countryside forced the migration of thousands of peasants to the cities, resulting in serious shortages of agricultural workers and an oversupply of unskilled urban labor. When the shah's government was faced with mass opposition in the cities in 1978, not only did a disillusioned rural population fail to support the regime, but thousands of villagers participated in the protests that hastened the collapse of the monarchy.

The Book Of Trespass - Crossing the Lines that Divide Us (Hardcover): Nick Hayes The Book Of Trespass - Crossing the Lines that Divide Us (Hardcover)
Nick Hayes 1
R533 R444 Discovery Miles 4 440 Save R89 (17%) Ships in 10 - 20 working days

'Brilliant, passionate and political . . . The Book of Trespass will make you see landscapes differently' Robert Macfarlane The vast majority of our country is entirely unknown to us because we are banned from setting foot on it. By law of trespass, we are excluded from 92 per cent of the land and 97 per cent of its waterways, blocked by walls whose legitimacy is rarely questioned. But behind them lies a story of enclosure, exploitation and dispossession of public rights whose effects last to this day. The Book of Trespass takes us on a journey over the walls of England, into the thousands of square miles of rivers, woodland, lakes and meadows that are blocked from public access. By trespassing the land of the media magnates, Lords, politicians and private corporations that own England, Nick Hayes argues that the root of social inequality is the uneven distribution of land. Weaving together the stories of poachers, vagabonds, gypsies, witches, hippies, ravers, ramblers, migrants and protestors, and charting acts of civil disobedience that challenge orthodox power at its heart, The Book of Trespass will transform the way you see the land.

A Coffee Frontier - Land, Society, and Politics in Duaca, Venezuela, 1830-1936 (Paperback): Douglas Yarrington A Coffee Frontier - Land, Society, and Politics in Duaca, Venezuela, 1830-1936 (Paperback)
Douglas Yarrington
R758 Discovery Miles 7 580 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This study views the economic transformation of Duaca, Venezuela into a major coffee export center in the late nineteenth century. Yarrington examines the rise of the peasantry to prosperity, yet they later lost their stature as the local elite allied itself with the state to restructure society and coffee production on its own terms in the twentieth-century. The book is a pioneering study on peasant studies, export-led development, the relationship of state and society, and the consolidation of nation-states in Latin America.

Land Bargains and Chinese Capitalism - The Politics of Property Rights under Reform (Paperback): Meg E. Rithmire Land Bargains and Chinese Capitalism - The Politics of Property Rights under Reform (Paperback)
Meg E. Rithmire
R625 Discovery Miles 6 250 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Land reforms have been critical to the development of Chinese capitalism over the last several decades, yet land in China remains publicly owned. This book explores the political logic of reforms to land ownership and control, accounting for how land development and real estate have become synonymous with economic growth and prosperity in China. Drawing on extensive fieldwork and archival research, the book tracks land reforms and urban development at the national level and in three cities in a single Chinese region. The study reveals that the initial liberalization of land was reversed after China's first contemporary real estate bubble in the early 1990s and that property rights arrangements at the local level varied widely according to different local strategies for economic prosperity and political stability. In particular, the author links fiscal relations and economic bases to property rights regimes, finding that more 'open' cities are subject to greater state control over land.

Wilderness of Hope - Fly Fishing and Public Lands in the American West (Hardcover): Quinn Grover Wilderness of Hope - Fly Fishing and Public Lands in the American West (Hardcover)
Quinn Grover
R525 R428 Discovery Miles 4 280 Save R97 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Longtime fly fisherman Quinn Grover had contemplated the "why" of his fishing identity before more recently becoming focused on the "how" of it. He realized he was a dedicated fly fisherman in large part because public lands and public waterways in the West made it possible. In Wilderness of Hope Grover recounts his fly-fishing experiences with a strong evocation of place, connecting those experiences to the ongoing national debate over public lands. Because so much of America's public lands are in the Intermountain West, this is where arguments about the use and limits of those lands rage the loudest. And those loudest in the debate often become caricatures: rural ranchers who hate the government; West Coast elites who don't know the West outside Vail, Colorado; and energy and mining companies who extract from once-protected areas. These caricatures obscure the complexity of those who use public lands and what those lands mean to a wider population. Although for Grover fishing is often an "escape" back to wildness, it is also a way to find a home in nature and recalibrate his interactions with other parts of his life as a father, son, husband, and citizen. Grover sees fly fishing on public waterways as a vehicle for interacting with nature that allows humans to inhabit nature rather than destroy or "preserve" it by keeping it entirely separate from human contact. These essays reflect on personal fishing experiences with a strong evocation of place and an attempt to understand humans' relationship with water and public land in the American West. Purchase the audio edition.

Historical Farmland in China During 1661-1980 - Reconstruction and Spatiotemporal Characteristics (Hardcover, 1st ed. 2018):... Historical Farmland in China During 1661-1980 - Reconstruction and Spatiotemporal Characteristics (Hardcover, 1st ed. 2018)
Xiaobin Jin, Yinkang Zhou, Xuhong Yang, Yinong Cheng
R2,999 Discovery Miles 29 990 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This book explores various approaches to reconstruct the spatial and temporal distribution of historical farmland in China. The book contains background information about political regimes, economic and social development, population changes and land resource utilization in the past 300 years in China. A literature review focuses on the assumptions, methodologies and models of reconstructing historical land-use datasets while addresses accuracy evaluation issues. Historical population size, its growth rate, and the evolution of spatial-temporal patterns of farmland in China have also been discussed. Almost all available historical data about farmland such as historical documents, archives, taxation records, statistics and research outcomes have been collected to reconstruct the amount of historical farmland. With a few principles and assumptions, a delicate Cellular Automaton (CA) and Multi-Agents (MAS) model based on bottom-up management scheme has been applied to derive the spatial-temporal distribution of farmland with the 1km*1km grid resolution for the period between 1661 and 1980 in China. Suggestions for future studies related to reconstructing historical land-use changes are then provided.

The Politics of Vulnerability - How to Heal Muslim-Christian Relations in a Post-Christian America: Today's Threat to... The Politics of Vulnerability - How to Heal Muslim-Christian Relations in a Post-Christian America: Today's Threat to Religion and Religious Freedom (Hardcover)
Asma T Uddin
R511 R466 Discovery Miles 4 660 Save R45 (9%) Ships in 10 - 20 working days

A religious liberty lawyer and acclaimed author reveals the root of America's polarization inside the Muslim and evangelical Christian divide-and how it can be healed. Despite the dire consequences of America's cultural, political, and religious divisiveness, from increasing incivility to discrimination and outright violence, few have been able to get to the core cause of this conflict. Even fewer have offered measures for reconcilliation. Now, in The Politics of Vulnerability, Asma Uddin, American-Muslim public intellectual, religious-liberties attorney, and activist, provides a unique perspective on the complex political and social factors contributing to the Muslim-Christian divide. Unlike other analysts, Uddin asks what underlying drivers cause otherwise good people to do-or believe-bad things? Why do people who value faith support of measures that limit others, especially of Muslims', religious freedom and other rights?' Uddin humanizes a contentious relationship by fully embracing both sides as individuals driven by very human fears and anxieties. Many conservative Christians fear that the Left is dismantling traditional "Christian America" to replace it with an Islamized America, a conspiratorial theory that has given rise to an "evangelical persecution complex," a politicized vulnerability. Uddin reveals that Islamophobia and other aspects of the conservative Christian movement are interconnected. Where does hate come from and how can it be conquered? Only by addressing the underlying factors of this politics of vulnerability can we begin to heal the divide.

The Struggle for Water - Politics, Rationality, and Identity in the American Southwest (Paperback, 2nd Ed.): Wendy Nelson... The Struggle for Water - Politics, Rationality, and Identity in the American Southwest (Paperback, 2nd Ed.)
Wendy Nelson Espeland
R882 Discovery Miles 8 820 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Nearly fifty years ago, the Bureau of Reclamation proposed building a dam at the confluence of two rivers in Central Arizona. While the dam would bring valuable water to this arid plain, it would also destroy a wildlife habitat, flood archaeological sites, and force the Yavapai Indians off their ancestral home. "The Struggle for Water" is not only the fascinating story of this controversial and ultimately thwarted public works project but also a study of rationality as a cultural, organizational, and political construct.
In the 1970s, the three groups most intimately involved in the Orme Dam--younger Bureau of Reclamation employees committed to "rational choice" decision making, older Bureau engineers committed to the dam, and the Yavapai community--all found themselves and their values transformed by their struggles. Wendy Nelson Espeland lays bare the relations between interests and identities that emerged during the conflict, creating a contemporary tale of power and colonization, bureaucracies and democratic practice, that asks the crucial question of what it means to be "rational."

Land, Power & Custom - Controversies Generated By South Africa's Communal Land Rights Act (Paperback): Aninka Claassens,... Land, Power & Custom - Controversies Generated By South Africa's Communal Land Rights Act (Paperback)
Aninka Claassens, Ben Cousins
R575 R495 Discovery Miles 4 950 Save R80 (14%) Ships in 4 - 8 working days

Land is a burning issue in South Africa, as in Africa more widely. One particularly controversial aspect is the reform of communal land tenure, which impacts on power and gender relations. The relevant legislation in South Africa is the Communal Land Rights Act of 2004, which aims to secure the land rights of people living in communal areas.

Land, Power & Custom: Controversies generated by South Africa’s Communal Land Rights Act is a joint project with the Legal Resources Centre (LRC) which has long been involved in litigation concerning land rights in rural areas. It combines chapters written by experts in the fields of land tenure, customary law, history and land reform, and detailed case studies collected from rural communities. The book discusses and explains the impact that provisions of the Act will have on current problems, and the danger that it will introduce new forms of conflict and instability. Many of the chapters argue that the Act entrenches key distortions that derive from colonialism and apartheid.

The chapters are relevant to debates about land tenure taking place throughout Africa and other parts of the world. It will be of great interest to students of customary law and land law, sociology and political science, legal practitioners and development workers engaged with land issues.

The book includes a DVD-ROM containing over 3 000 pages of related material, including current and historical legislation affecting communal land and affidavits by rural applicants, state officials and traditional leaders in pending litigation concerning land rights and chiefly power.

Betrayed Trust - Africans and the State in Colonial Natal (Paperback): John Lambert Betrayed Trust - Africans and the State in Colonial Natal (Paperback)
John Lambert
R100 R86 Discovery Miles 860 Save R14 (14%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

Betrayed Trust is the first close, scholarly examination of African homestead society in Natal during the colonial period. Carefully researched and dispassionately written, it is an account of dispossession - and of what dispossession meant in real terms. John Lambert has added a very important dimension to the history of this region. In delineating the wider implications of land deprivation, he has provided vital background to the emotionally charged question of land redistribution.

Mashpee Indians - Tribe on Trial (Paperback): Jack Campisi Mashpee Indians - Tribe on Trial (Paperback)
Jack Campisi
R455 Discovery Miles 4 550 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This is a reconstruction of the trial where the Mashpee Indians claimed ownership of the area of Cape Cod that they have occupied for 350 years. Their claim was rejected as they were judged not to be a true tribe, having not survived as an ethnic identity.

Women, Land and Justice in Tanzania (Hardcover): Helen Dancer Women, Land and Justice in Tanzania (Hardcover)
Helen Dancer
R918 Discovery Miles 9 180 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Recent decades have seen a wave of land law reforms across Africa, in the context of a "land rush" and land-grabbing. But how has this been enacted on the ground and, in particular, how have women experienced this? This book seeks to re-orientate current debates on women's land rights towards a focus on the law in action. Drawing on the author's ethnographic research in the Arusha region of Tanzania, it explores how the country's land law reforms have impacted on women's legal claims to land. Centring on cases involving women litigants, the book considers the extent to which women are realising their interests in land through land courts and follows the progression of women's claims to land - from their social origins through processes of dispute resolution to judgment. Dancer's work explores three central issues. First, it considers the nature of women's claims to land in Tanzanian family contexts, the value of land in an era of land reform and the 'land rush' across Africa, and the extent to which the social issues raised are addressed by Tanzania's current laws and legal system. Secondly, it examines how agency and power relations between social and legal actors engaged in legal processes affect women's access to justice and the progression of claims. Thirdly, it explores Tanzanian concepts of justice and rights and how women's claims have been judged by land courts in practice. Helen Dancer is a lecturer in Law at the University of Brighton. She practised as a barrister in England specialising in family legal aid cases prior to training as a legal anthropologist. She is also a consultant for Future Agricultures at IDS, University of Sussex. Her areas of research interest include law and development, gender and land, and human rights and legal pluralism.

Who Owns England? - How We Lost Our Land and How to Take it Back (Paperback): Guy Shrubsole Who Owns England? - How We Lost Our Land and How to Take it Back (Paperback)
Guy Shrubsole 1
R255 R204 Discovery Miles 2 040 Save R51 (20%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

'A formidable, brave and important book' Robert Macfarlane Who owns England? Behind this simple question lies this country's oldest and best-kept secret. This is the history of how England's elite came to own our land, and an inspiring manifesto for how to open up our countryside once more. This book has been a long time coming. Since 1086, in fact. For centuries, England's elite have covered up how they got their hands on millions of acres of our land, by constructing walls, burying surveys and more recently, sheltering behind offshore shell companies. But with the dawn of digital mapping and the Freedom of Information Act, it's becoming increasingly difficult for them to hide. Trespassing through tightly-guarded country estates, ecologically ravaged grouse moors and empty Mayfair mansions, writer and activist Guy Shrubsole has used these 21st century tools to uncover a wealth of never-before-seen information about the people who own our land, to create the most comprehensive map of land ownership in England that has ever been made public. From secret military islands to tunnels deep beneath London, Shrubsole unearths truths concealed since the Domesday Book about who is really in charge of this country - at a time when Brexit is meant to be returning sovereignty to the people. Melding history, politics and polemic, he vividly demonstrates how taking control of land ownership is key to tackling everything from the housing crisis to climate change - and even halting the erosion of our very democracy. It's time to expose the truth about who owns England - and finally take back our green and pleasant land.

For a Proper Home - Housing Rights in the Margins of Urban Chile, 1960-2010 (Paperback): Edward Murphy For a Proper Home - Housing Rights in the Margins of Urban Chile, 1960-2010 (Paperback)
Edward Murphy
R830 Discovery Miles 8 300 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

From 1967 to 1973, a period that culminated in the socialist project of Salvador Allende, nearly 400,000 low-income Chileans illegally seized parcels of land on the outskirts of Santiago. Remarkably, today almost all of these individuals live in homes with property titles. As Edward Murphy shows, this transformation came at a steep price, through an often-violent political and social struggle that continues to this day.
In analyzing the causes and consequences of this struggle, Murphy reveals a crucial connection between homeownership and understandings of proper behavior and governance. This link between property and propriety has been at the root of a powerful, contested urban politics central to both social activism and urban development projects. Through projects of reform, revolution, and reaction, a right to housing and homeownership has been a significant symbol of governmental benevolence and poverty reduction. Under Pinochet's neoliberalism, subsidized housing and slum eradication programs displaced many squatters, while awarding them homes of their own. This process, in addition to ongoing forms of activism, has permitted the vast majority of squatters to live in homes with property titles, a momentous change of the past half-century.
This triumph is tempered by the fact that today the urban poor struggle with high levels of unemployment and underemployment, significant debt, and a profoundly segregated and hostile urban landscape. They also find it more difficult to mobilize than in the past, and as homeowners they can no longer rally around the cause of housing rights.
Citing cultural theorists from Marx to Foucault, Murphy directly links the importance of home ownership and property rights among Santiago's urban poor to definitions of Chilean citizenship and propriety. He explores how the deeply embedded liberal belief system of individual property ownership has shaped political, social, and physical landscapes in the city. His approach sheds light on the role that social movements and the gendered contours of home life have played in the making of citizenship. It also illuminates processes through which squatters have received legally sanctioned homes of their own, a phenomenon of critical importance in cities throughout much of Latin America and the Global South.

Land Bargains and Chinese Capitalism - The Politics of Property Rights under Reform (Hardcover): Meg E. Rithmire Land Bargains and Chinese Capitalism - The Politics of Property Rights under Reform (Hardcover)
Meg E. Rithmire
R1,978 Discovery Miles 19 780 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Land reforms have been critical to the development of Chinese capitalism over the last several decades, yet land in China remains publicly owned. This book explores the political logic of reforms to land ownership and control, accounting for how land development and real estate have become synonymous with economic growth and prosperity in China. Drawing on extensive fieldwork and archival research, the book tracks land reforms and urban development at the national level and in three cities in a single Chinese region. The study reveals that the initial liberalization of land was reversed after China's first contemporary real estate bubble in the early 1990s and that property rights arrangements at the local level varied widely according to different local strategies for economic prosperity and political stability. In particular, the author links fiscal relations and economic bases to property rights regimes, finding that more 'open' cities are subject to greater state control over land.

Building an American Empire - The Era of Territorial and Political Expansion (Hardcover): Paul Frymer Building an American Empire - The Era of Territorial and Political Expansion (Hardcover)
Paul Frymer
R868 Discovery Miles 8 680 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

How American westward expansion was governmentally engineered to promote the formation of a white settler nation Westward expansion of the United States is most conventionally remembered for rugged individualism, geographic isolationism, and a fair amount of luck. Yet the establishment of the forty-eight contiguous states was hardly a foregone conclusion, and the federal government played a critical role in its success. This book examines the politics of American expansion, showing how the government's regulation of population movements on the frontier, both settlement and removal, advanced national aspirations for empire and promoted the formation of a white settler nation. Building an American Empire details how a government that struggled to exercise plenary power used federal land policy to assert authority over the direction of expansion by engineering the pace and patterns of settlement and to control the movement of populations. At times, the government mobilized populations for compact settlement in strategically important areas of the frontier; at other times, policies were designed to actively restrain settler populations in order to prevent violence, international conflict, and breakaway states. Paul Frymer examines how these settlement patterns helped construct a dominant racial vision for America by incentivizing and directing the movement of white European settlers onto indigenous and diversely populated lands. These efforts were hardly seamless, and Frymer pays close attention to the failures as well, from the lack of further expansion into Latin America to the defeat of the black colonization movement. Building an American Empire reveals the lasting and profound significance government settlement policies had for the nation, both for establishing America as dominantly white and for restricting broader aspirations for empire in lands that could not be so racially engineered.

Speaking Stones Intifada - Communiques from the Intifada Underground (Hardcover, 1st ed): Shaul Mishal Speaking Stones Intifada - Communiques from the Intifada Underground (Hardcover, 1st ed)
Shaul Mishal
R1,079 Discovery Miles 10 790 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This work provides a selection of underground documents (never before translated) of the two leading bodies of the Intifada: the United National Command and the Islamic Resistance Movement, known as Hamas. Communiques or leaflets were an essential element of Palestinian political life and served as a vehicle of expression and a way to direct behaviour and organise the people. Shaul Mishal carefully analyses these documents in an effort to understand the forces that turned the wheels of the Palestinian uprising: their goals; methods of operation; and their success in obtaining the willing cooperation of all segments of the Palestinian population. Since the Israeli conquest of the West Bank and Gaza in 1967, there had been minor eruptions of violence by Palestinians against Israelis. But for the 20 years before December 1987 and the uprising, there had never been such an intense and prolonged demonstration against the occupation. The Intifada inspired a new generation of Palestinian radicals who conducted their protests through petrol bombs and street violence and relayed their messages through underground propaganda. In place of any official and prominent leadership, communiques became the voice of the rebels. The book should be of interest to scholars and students of Middle East studies, particularly of the Arab-Israeli conflict.

The Politics of Land (Hardcover): Tim Bartley The Politics of Land (Hardcover)
Tim Bartley
R1,855 Discovery Miles 18 550 Ships in 10 - 20 working days

The politics of land are vital. They stretch from fights over fracking, gentrification, and taxation to land grabs, dispossession, and border conflicts. And they raise crucial questions about power, authority, violence, populism, and neoliberalism. This volume of Research in Political Sociology seeks to carve out a renewed political sociology of land, bringing together classic questions about the state, commodification, and social change and contemporary studies of contentious land use in various parts of the world. An introductory essay sketches foundations for a political sociology of land and specifies what is unique about land in comparison to other political objects. Chapters are based on highly original qualitative, quantitative, and/or historical analyses to shed light on numerous dimensions of land politics. They include analyses of anti-fracking campaigns, property tax caps, and "green gentrification" in the United States, soil protection regulation in Europe, squatter settlements in Peru, land grabs in peri-urban China and rural Senegal, violent expulsions in Colombia, and the privatization of property rights in Morocco. The volume brings together high quality, peer-reviewed research, opens up novel comparisons, and enriches theories of the state, commodification, and collective resistance.

Building an American Empire - The Era of Territorial and Political Expansion (Paperback): Paul Frymer Building an American Empire - The Era of Territorial and Political Expansion (Paperback)
Paul Frymer
R610 Discovery Miles 6 100 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

How American westward expansion was governmentally engineered to promote the formation of a white settler nation Westward expansion of the United States is most conventionally remembered for rugged individualism, geographic isolationism, and a fair amount of luck. Yet the establishment of the forty-eight contiguous states was hardly a foregone conclusion, and the federal government played a critical role in its success. This book examines the politics of American expansion, showing how the government's regulation of population movements on the frontier, both settlement and removal, advanced national aspirations for empire and promoted the formation of a white settler nation. Building an American Empire details how a government that struggled to exercise plenary power used federal land policy to assert authority over the direction of expansion by engineering the pace and patterns of settlement and to control the movement of populations. At times, the government mobilized populations for compact settlement in strategically important areas of the frontier; at other times, policies were designed to actively restrain settler populations in order to prevent violence, international conflict, and breakaway states. Paul Frymer examines how these settlement patterns helped construct a dominant racial vision for America by incentivizing and directing the movement of white European settlers onto indigenous and diversely populated lands. These efforts were hardly seamless, and Frymer pays close attention to the failures as well, from the lack of further expansion into Latin America to the defeat of the black colonization movement. Building an American Empire reveals the lasting and profound significance government settlement policies had for the nation, both for establishing America as dominantly white and for restricting broader aspirations for empire in lands that could not be so racially engineered.

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