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Books > Humanities > Philosophy > Topics in philosophy > Epistemology, theory of knowledge

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The Origins of Knowledge and Imagination (Paperback, New Ed) Loot Price: R543
Discovery Miles 5 430

The Origins of Knowledge and Imagination (Paperback, New Ed)

Jacob Bronowski

Series: The Silliman Memorial Lectures Series

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Loot Price R543 Discovery Miles 5 430

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Bronowski is a beautiful writer. And if truth is beauty then Bronowski is also a truthful writer. No cliche: these essays are the Silliman Lectures that Bronowski delivered at Yale in 1967, a series established "to illustrate the presence and providence of God. . . [through] an orderly presentation of the facts of nature or history." Bronowski's synthesis is a gem of enlightenment. He emphasizes at the outset the importance of the visual sense and of language as the roots of human creativity - of knowledge and imagination in the arts and sciences. The relativity of truth in science is a natural consequence of the finiteness of the human endeavor. We can select only so much to consider, we can "decode" only so many of nature's "sentences" into the algorithms, concepts, and symbols of our truth systems. But in reality all nature is connected. Science evolves toward better descriptions as it is able to correct past errors and move toward closer approximations of Nature's laws. This logic is elegantly demonstrated in Bronowski's essay on "undecidables" and the metalogical formulations about consistency and completeness in axiomatic systems as developed by Russell, Tarski, Turing, and the late Kurt Godel. One rejoices in Bronowski's dedication to the identity of acts of creativity and of imagination, whether in Blake or Yeats or Einstein or Heisenberg. But a certain datedness clouds the last essay on the scientific community as truth bearers. In the intervening decade (since 1967), a democratic society has found its scientific elite wanting in humility and at times all too ready to compromise. Be that as it may, we are better off for the Bronowskis: good men we should seek to emulate. (Kirkus Reviews)
"A gem of enlightenment. . . . One rejoices in Bronowski's dedication to the identity of acts of creativity and of imagination, whether in Blake or Yeats or Einstein or Heisenberg."-Kirkus Reviews "A delightful look at the inquiring mind."-Library Journal In this eloquent volume Jacob Bronowski, mathematician and scientist, presents a succinct introduction to the state of modern thinking about the role of science in man's intellectual and moral life. Weaving together themes from ethnology, linguistics, philosophy, and physics, he confronts the questions of who we are, what we are, and how we relate to the universe around us.

General

Imprint: Yale University Press
Country of origin: United States
Series: The Silliman Memorial Lectures Series
Release date: July 1979
First published: September 1979
Authors: Jacob Bronowski
Dimensions: 202 x 229 x 12mm (L x W x T)
Format: Paperback
Pages: 144
Edition: New Ed
ISBN-13: 978-0-300-02409-8
Categories: Books > Humanities > Philosophy > Topics in philosophy > Epistemology, theory of knowledge
Books > Philosophy > Topics in philosophy > Epistemology, theory of knowledge
LSN: 0-300-02409-6
Barcode: 9780300024098

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