0
Your cart

Your cart is empty

Books > History > American history

Buy Now

Maintaining Segregation - Children and Racial Instruction in the South, 1920-1955 (Hardcover) Loot Price: R998
Discovery Miles 9 980
Maintaining Segregation - Children and Racial Instruction in the South, 1920-1955 (Hardcover): Leeann G Reynolds

Maintaining Segregation - Children and Racial Instruction in the South, 1920-1955 (Hardcover)

Leeann G Reynolds

Series: Making the Modern South

 (sign in to rate)
Loot Price R998 Discovery Miles 9 980 | Repayment Terms: R91 pm x 12*

Bookmark and Share

Expected to ship within 7 - 11 working days

In Maintaining Segregation, LeeAnn G. Reynolds explores how black and white children in the early twentieth-century South learned about segregation in their homes, schools, and churches. As public lynchings and other displays of racial violence declined in the 1920s, a culture of silence developed around segregation, serving to forestall, absorb, and deflect individual challenges to the racial hierarchy. The cumulative effect of the racial instruction southern children received, prior to highly publicized news such as the Brown v. Board of Education decision and the Montgomery bus boycott, perpetuated segregation by discouraging discussion or critical examination. As the system of segregation evolved throughout the early twentieth century, generations of southerners came of age having little or no knowledge of life without institutionalized segregation. Reynolds examines the motives and approaches of white and black parents to racial instruction in the home and how their methods reinforced the status quo. Whereas white families sought to preserve the legal system of segregation and their place within it, black families faced the more complicated task of ensuring the safety of their children in a racist society without sacrificing their sense of self-worth. Schools and churches functioned as secondary sites for racial conditioning, and Reynolds traces the ways in which these institutions alternately challenged and encouraged the marginalization of black Americans both within society and the historical narrative. In order for subsequent generations to imagine and embrace the sort of racial equality championed by the civil rights movement, they had to overcome preconceived notions of race instilled since childhood. Ultimately, Reynolds's work reveals that the social change that occurred due to the civil rights movement can only be fully understood within the context of the segregation imposed upon children by southern institutions throughout much of the early twentieth century.

General

Imprint: Louisiana State University Press
Country of origin: United States
Series: Making the Modern South
Release date: April 2017
Contributors: Leeann G Reynolds
Dimensions: 230 x 158 x 22mm (L x W x T)
Format: Hardcover - Cloth over boards
Pages: 272
ISBN-13: 978-0-8071-6564-5
Categories: Books > Social sciences > Education > General
Books > Humanities > History > American history > General
Books > Humanities > History > History of specific subjects > Social & cultural history
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Ethnic studies > General
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Social issues > Equal opportunities
Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Social groups & communities > Age groups > Children
Books > History > American history > General
Books > History > History of specific subjects > Social & cultural history
LSN: 0-8071-6564-6
Barcode: 9780807165645

Is the information for this product incomplete, wrong or inappropriate? Let us know about it.

Does this product have an incorrect or missing image? Send us a new image.

Is this product missing categories? Add more categories.

Review This Product

No reviews yet - be the first to create one!

Partners