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Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Crime & criminology > Penology & punishment > Capital punishment

The Morality of Punishment (Hardcover): Ilham Ragimov The Morality of Punishment (Hardcover)
Ilham Ragimov
R603 Discovery Miles 6 030 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days
The Morality of Punishment (Paperback): Ilham Ragimov The Morality of Punishment (Paperback)
Ilham Ragimov
R391 Discovery Miles 3 910 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days
The Death Penalty on the Ballot - American Democracy and the Fate of Capital Punishment (Paperback): Austin Sarat The Death Penalty on the Ballot - American Democracy and the Fate of Capital Punishment (Paperback)
Austin Sarat
R558 R433 Discovery Miles 4 330 Save R125 (22%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Investigating the attitudes about capital punishment in contemporary America, this book poses the question: can ending the death penalty be done democratically? How is it that a liberal democracy like the United States shares the distinction of being a leading proponent of the death penalty with some of the world's most repressive regimes? Reporting on the first study of initiative and referendum processes used to decide the fate of the death penalty in the United States, this book explains how these processes have played an important, but generally neglected, role in the recent history of America's death penalty. While numerous scholars have argued that the death penalty is incompatible with democracy and that it cannot be reconciled with democracy's underlying commitment to respect the equal dignity of all, Professor Austin Sarat offers the first study of what happens when the public gets to decide on the fate of capital punishment.

How Ethical Systems Change: Lynching and Capital Punishment (Paperback): Sheldon Ekland-Olson, Danielle Dirks How Ethical Systems Change: Lynching and Capital Punishment (Paperback)
Sheldon Ekland-Olson, Danielle Dirks
R286 Discovery Miles 2 860 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Slavery, lynching and capital punishment were interwoven in the United States and by the mid-twentieth century these connections gave rise to a small but well-focused reform movement. Biased and perfunctory procedures were replaced by prolonged trials and appeals, which some found messy and meaningless; DNA profiling clearly established innocent persons had been sentenced to death. The debate over taking life to protect life continues; this book is based on a hugely popular undergraduate course taught at the University of Texas, and is ideal for those interested in criminal justice, social problems, social inequality, and social movements. This book is an excerpt from a larger text, Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Decides?, http://www.routledge.com/9780415892476/

Last Chance for Life: Clemency in Southeast Asian Death Penalty Cases (Hardcover): Daniel Pascoe Last Chance for Life: Clemency in Southeast Asian Death Penalty Cases (Hardcover)
Daniel Pascoe
R1,510 Discovery Miles 15 100 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

All five contemporary practitioners of the death penalty in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)- Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and Vietnam- have performed executions on a regular basis over the past few decades. NGO Amnesty International currently classifies each of these nations as death penalty 'retentionists'. However, notwithstanding a common willingness to execute, the number of death sentences passed by courts that are reduced to a term of imprisonment, or where the prisoner is released from custody altogether, through grants of clemency by the executive branch of government, varies remarkably among these neighbouring political allies. Last Chance for Life: Clemency in Southeast Asian Death Penalty Cases explores the patterns which explain why some countries in the region award clemency far more often than do others in death penalty cases. Over the period under analysis from 1991 to 2016, the regional outliers were Thailand (with more than 95% of condemned prisoners receiving clemency after exhausting judicial appeals) and Singapore (with fewer than 1% of condemned prisoners receiving clemency). Malaysia, Indonesia and Vietnam fall at points in between these two extremes. What results is the first research monograph, anywhere in the world, to compare death penalty clemency across national borders using empirical methodology, the latter a systematic collection of clemency data in multiple jurisdictions using archival and 'elite' interview sources. Last Chance for Life is an authoritative resource for legal practitioners, criminal justice policy makers, scholars and activists throughout the ASEAN region and around the retentionist world.

Killing Times - The Temporal Technology of the Death Penalty (Paperback): David Wills Killing Times - The Temporal Technology of the Death Penalty (Paperback)
David Wills
R638 R543 Discovery Miles 5 430 Save R95 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Killing Times begins with the deceptively simple observation-made by Jacques Derrida in his seminars on the topic-that the death penalty mechanically interrupts mortal time by preempting the typical mortal experience of not knowing at what precise moment we will die. Through a broader examination of what constitutes mortal temporality, David Wills proposes that the so-called machinery of death summoned by the death penalty works by exploiting, or perverting, the machinery of time that is already attached to human existence. Time, Wills argues, functions for us in general as a prosthetic technology, but the application of the death penalty represents a new level of prosthetic intervention into what constitutes the human. Killing Times traces the logic of the death penalty across a range of sites. Starting with the legal cases whereby American courts have struggled to articulate what methods of execution constitute "cruel and unusual punishment," Wills goes on to show the ways that technologies of death have themselves evolved in conjunction with ideas of cruelty and instantaneity, from the development of the guillotine and the trap door for hanging, through the firing squad and the electric chair, through today's controversies surrounding lethal injection. Responding to the legal system's repeated recourse to storytelling-prosecutors' and politicians' endless recounting of the horrors of crimes-Wills gives a careful eye to the narrative, even fictive spaces that surround crime and punishment. Many of the controversies surrounding capital punishment, Wills argues, revolve around the complex temporality of the death penalty: how its instant works in conjunction with forms of suspension, or extension of time; how its seeming correlation between egregious crime and painless execution is complicated by a number of different discourses. By pinpointing the temporal technology that marks the death penalty, Wills is able to show capital punishment's expansive reach, tracing the ways it has come to govern not only executions within the judicial system, but also the opposed but linked categories of the suicide bombing and drone warfare. In discussing the temporal technology of death, Wills elaborates the workings both of the terrorist who produces a simultaneity of crime and "punishment" that bypasses judicial process, and of the security state, in whose remote-control killings the time-space coordinates of "justice" are compressed and at the same time disappear into the black hole of secrecy. Grounded in a deep ethical and political commitment to death penalty abolition, Wills's engaging and powerfully argued book pushes the question of capital punishment beyond the confines of legal argument to show how the technology of capital punishment defines and appropriates the instant of death and reconfigures the whole of human mortality.

A Courageous Fool - Marie Deans and Her Struggle against the Death Penalty (Hardcover): Todd C. Peppers, Margaret A Anderson A Courageous Fool - Marie Deans and Her Struggle against the Death Penalty (Hardcover)
Todd C. Peppers, Margaret A Anderson; Foreword by Joseph M Giarratano
R2,211 Discovery Miles 22 110 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

There have been many heroes and victims in the battle to abolish the death penalty, and Marie Deans fits into both of those categories. A South Carolina native who yearned to be a fiction writer, Marie was thrust by a combination of circumstances-including the murder of her beloved mother-in-law-into a world much stranger than fiction, a world in which minorities and the poor were selected to be sacrificed to what Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun called the ""machinery of death."" Marie found herself fighting to bring justice to the legal process and to bring humanity not only to prisoners on death row but to the guards and wardens as well. During Marie's time as a death penalty opponent in South Carolina and Virginia, she experienced the highs of helping exonerate the innocent and the lows of standing death watch in the death house with thirty-four condemned men.

Inferno - An Anatomy of American Punishment (Paperback): Robert A. Ferguson Inferno - An Anatomy of American Punishment (Paperback)
Robert A. Ferguson
R342 Discovery Miles 3 420 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

An Open Letters Monthly Best Nonfiction Book of the Year America's criminal justice system is broken. The United States punishes at a higher per capita rate than any other country in the world. In the last twenty years, incarceration rates have risen 500 percent. Sentences are harsh, prisons are overcrowded, life inside is dangerous, and rehabilitation programs are ineffective. Looking not only to court records but to works of philosophy, history, and literature for illumination, Robert Ferguson, a distinguished law professor, diagnoses all parts of a now massive, out-of-control punishment regime. "If I had won the $400 million Powerball lottery last week I swear I would have ordered a copy for every member of Congress, every judge in America, every prosecutor, and every state prison official and lawmaker who controls the life of even one of the millions of inmates who exist today, many in inhumane and deplorable conditions, in our nation's prisons." -Andrew Cohen, The Atlantic "Inferno is a passionate, wide-ranging effort to understand and challenge...our heavy reliance on imprisonment. It is an important book, especially for those (like me) who are inclined towards avoidance and tragic complacency...[Ferguson's] book is too balanced and thoughtful to be disregarded." -Robert F. Nagel, Weekly Standard

The Death Penalty on the Ballot - American Democracy and the Fate of Capital Punishment (Hardcover): Austin Sarat The Death Penalty on the Ballot - American Democracy and the Fate of Capital Punishment (Hardcover)
Austin Sarat
R1,445 R1,358 Discovery Miles 13 580 Save R87 (6%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Investigating the attitudes about capital punishment in contemporary America, this book poses the question: can ending the death penalty be done democratically? How is it that a liberal democracy like the United States shares the distinction of being a leading proponent of the death penalty with some of the world's most repressive regimes? Reporting on the first study of initiative and referendum processes used to decide the fate of the death penalty in the United States, this book explains how these processes have played an important, but generally neglected, role in the recent history of America's death penalty. While numerous scholars have argued that the death penalty is incompatible with democracy and that it cannot be reconciled with democracy's underlying commitment to respect the equal dignity of all, Professor Austin Sarat offers the first study of what happens when the public gets to decide on the fate of capital punishment.

Deadly Justice - A Statistical Portrait of the Death Penalty (Paperback): Frank Baumgartner, Marty Davidson, Kaneesha Johnson,... Deadly Justice - A Statistical Portrait of the Death Penalty (Paperback)
Frank Baumgartner, Marty Davidson, Kaneesha Johnson, Arvind Krishnamurthy, Colin Wilson
R530 Discovery Miles 5 300 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

In 1976, the US Supreme Court ruled in Gregg v. Georgia that the death penalty was constitutional if it complied with certain specific provisions designed to ensure that it was reserved for the 'worst of the worst.' The same court had rejected the death penalty just four years before in the Furman decision because it found that the penalty had been applied in a capricious and arbitrary manner. The 1976 decision ushered in the 'modern' period of the US death penalty, setting the country on a course to execute over 1,400 inmates in the ensuing years, with over 8,000 individuals currently sentenced to die. Now, forty years after the decision, the eminent political scientist Frank Baumgartner along with a team of younger scholars (Marty Davidson, Kaneesha Johnson, Arvind Krishnamurthy, and Colin Wilson) have collaborated to assess the empirical record and provide a definitive account of how the death penalty has been implemented. Each chapter addresses a precise empirical question and provides evidence, not opinion, about whether how the modern death penalty has functioned. They decided to write the book after Justice Breyer issued a dissent in a 2015 death penalty case in which he asked for a full briefing on the constitutionality of the death penalty. In particular, they assess the extent to which the modern death penalty has met the aspirations of Gregg or continues to suffer from the flaws that caused its rejection in Furman. To answer this question, they provide the most comprehensive statistical account yet of the workings of the capital punishment system. Authoritative and pithy, the book is intended for both students in a wide variety of fields, researchers studying the topic, and-not least-the Supreme Court itself.

Killing McVeigh - The Death Penalty and the Myth of Closure (Paperback): Jody Lynee Madeira Killing McVeigh - The Death Penalty and the Myth of Closure (Paperback)
Jody Lynee Madeira
R528 R455 Discovery Miles 4 550 Save R73 (14%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

* "A faithful account." - Richard C. Dieter, Executive Director, Death Penalty Information Center * "In-depth, fair-minded and sensitive." - Carol Steiker, Henry J. Friendly Professor of Law, Harvard Law School * "Intense yet compassionate." - Sister Helen Prejean, author of Dead Man Walking * "Clearly written and persuasive." - Harry Charles, Library Journal * "Sensitive, nuanced, and empathetic." - Contemporary Psychology * "Provocative, interesting, and deserve[s] attention." - Choice "Important, comprehensive, and insightful analysis." - Rutgers

A Courageous Fool - Marie Deans and Her Struggle against the Death Penalty (Paperback): Todd C. Peppers, Margaret A Anderson A Courageous Fool - Marie Deans and Her Struggle against the Death Penalty (Paperback)
Todd C. Peppers, Margaret A Anderson; Foreword by Joseph M Giarratano
R582 R458 Discovery Miles 4 580 Save R124 (21%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

There have been many heroes and victims in the battle to abolish the death penalty, and Marie Deans fits into both of those categories. A South Carolina native who yearned to be a fiction writer, Marie was thrust by a combination of circumstances-including the murder of her beloved mother-in-law-into a world much stranger than fiction, a world in which minorities and the poor were selected to be sacrificed to what Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun called the ""machinery of death."" Marie found herself fighting to bring justice to the legal process and to bring humanity not only to prisoners on death row but to the guards and wardens as well. During Marie's time as a death penalty opponent in South Carolina and Virginia, she experienced the highs of helping exonerate the innocent and the lows of standing death watch in the death house with thirty-four condemned men.

Proof of Guilt - Barbara Graham and the Politics of Executing Women in America (Hardcover, 0 Ed): Kathleen A. Cairns Proof of Guilt - Barbara Graham and the Politics of Executing Women in America (Hardcover, 0 Ed)
Kathleen A. Cairns
R567 R442 Discovery Miles 4 420 Save R125 (22%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Barbara Graham might have been a diabolical dame in a hard-boiled detective story-beautiful, sexy, and deadly. Charged alongside two male friends in the murder of an elderly widow during a botched robbery attempt, "Bloody Babs" became the third woman executed in California-after a 1953 trial that played out before standing-room-only crowds captured the imaginations of journalists, filmmakers, and death penalty opponents. Why, Kathleen A. Cairns asks, of all the capital cases in the twentieth century, did Graham's have such political resonance and staying power? Leaving aside the question of guilt or innocence-debated to this day-Cairns examines how Graham's case became a touchstone in the ongoing debate over capital punishment. While prosecutors positioned the accused woman as a femme fatale, the media came to offer a counternarrative for Graham's life highlighting her abusive and lonely beginnings. Cairns shows how Graham's case became crucial to the abolitionists of the time, who used instances of questionable guilt to raise awareness of the arbitrary and capricious nature of death penalty prosecutions. Critical in keeping capital punishment in the forefront of public consciousness until abolitionists homed in on a winning strategy, Graham's case illustrates the power of individual stories to shape wider perceptions and ultimately public policies.

Killing McVeigh - The Death Penalty and the Myth of Closure (Hardcover, New): Jody Lynee Madeira Killing McVeigh - The Death Penalty and the Myth of Closure (Hardcover, New)
Jody Lynee Madeira
R1,457 R1,197 Discovery Miles 11 970 Save R260 (18%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

On April 19, 1995, Timothy McVeigh detonated a two-ton truck bomb that felled the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people. On June 11, 2001, an unprecedented 242 witnesses watched him die by lethal injection. In the aftermath of the bombings, American public commentary almost immediately turned to "closure" rhetoric. Reporters and audiences alike speculated about whether victim's family members and survivors could get closure from memorial services, funerals, legislation, monuments, trials, and executions. But what does "closure" really mean for those who survive--or lose loved ones in--traumatic acts? In the wake of such terrifying events, is closure a realistic or appropriate expectation? In Killing McVeigh, Jody Lynee Madeira uses the Oklahoma City bombing as a case study to explore how family members and other survivors come to terms with mass murder. As the fullest case study to date of the Oklahoma City Bombing survivors' struggle for justice and the first-ever case study of closure, this book describes the profound human and institutional impacts of these labors to demonstrate the importance of understanding what closure really is before naively asserting it can or has been reached.

End of its Rope - How Killing the Death Penalty Can Revive Criminal Justice (Hardcover): Brandon L. Garrett End of its Rope - How Killing the Death Penalty Can Revive Criminal Justice (Hardcover)
Brandon L. Garrett
R513 R418 Discovery Miles 4 180 Save R95 (19%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

It isn't enough to celebrate the death penalty's demise. We must learn from it.When Henry McCollum was condemned to death in 1983 in rural North Carolina, death sentences were commonplace. In 2015, DNA tests set McCollum free. By then, death sentences were as rare as lightning strikes. To most observers this national trend came as a surprise. What changed? Brandon Garrett hand-collected and analyzed national data, looking for causes and implications of this turnaround. End of Its Rope explains what he found, and why the story of who killed the death penalty and how can be the catalyst for criminal justice reform.No single factor put the death penalty on the road to extinction, Garrett concludes. Death row exonerations fostered rising awareness of errors in death penalty cases, at the same time that a decline in murder rates eroded law-and-order arguments. Defense lawyers radically improved how they litigate death cases when given adequate resources. More troubling, many states replaced the death penalty with what amounts to a virtual death sentence--life without possibility of parole. Today, the death penalty hangs on in a few scattered counties where prosecutors cling to entrenched habits and patterns of racial bias.The failed death penalty experiment teaches us how inept lawyering, overzealous prosecution, race discrimination, wrongful convictions, and excessive punishments undermine the pursuit of justice. Garrett makes a strong closing case for what a future criminal justice system might look like if these injustices were remedied.

The Road to Abolition? - The Future of Capital Punishment in the United States (Paperback): Charles J. Ogletree, Austin Sarat The Road to Abolition? - The Future of Capital Punishment in the United States (Paperback)
Charles J. Ogletree, Austin Sarat
R512 R443 Discovery Miles 4 430 Save R69 (13%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

At the start of the twenty-first century, America is in the midst of a profound national reconsideration of the death penalty. There has been a dramatic decline in the number of people being sentenced to death as well as executed, exonerations have become common, and the number of states abolishing the death penalty is on the rise. The essays featured in The Road to Abolition? track this shift in attitudes toward capital punishment, and consider whether or not the death penalty will ever be abolished in America.

The interdisciplinary group of experts gathered by Charles J. Ogletree Jr., and Austin Sarat ask and attempt to answer the hard questions that need to be addressed if the death penalty is to be abolished. Will the death penalty end only to be replaced with life in prison without parole? Will life without the possibility of parole become, in essence, the new death penalty? For abolitionists, might that be a pyrrhic victory? The contributors discuss how the death penalty might be abolished, with particular emphasis on the current debate over lethal injection as a case study on why and how the elimination of certain forms of execution might provide a model for the larger abolition of the death penalty.

Why We Kill - Understanding Violence Across Cultures and Disciplines (Paperback): Nancy Loucks, Sally Smith Holt, Joanna R.... Why We Kill - Understanding Violence Across Cultures and Disciplines (Paperback)
Nancy Loucks, Sally Smith Holt, Joanna R. Adler
R624 Discovery Miles 6 240 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Infanticide, serial killings, war, terrorism, abortion, honour killings, euthanasia, suicide bombings and genocide; all involve taking of life. Put most simply, all involve killing one or more other people. Yet cultural context influences heavily how one perceives all of these, and indeed, some readers of this paragraph may already have thought: 'But surely that doesn't belong with those others, that's not really killing.'
Why We Kill examines violence in many of its manifestations, exploring how culture plays a role in people's understanding of violent action.
From the first chapter, which tries to understand multiple forms of domestic homicide including infanticide, filicide, spousal homicide and honour killings, to the final chapter's bone-chilling account of the massacre at Murambi in Rwanda, this fascinating book makes compelling reading.

Confronting Capital Punishment in Asia - Human Rights, Politics and Public Opinion (Hardcover): Roger Hood, Surya Deva Confronting Capital Punishment in Asia - Human Rights, Politics and Public Opinion (Hardcover)
Roger Hood, Surya Deva
R1,744 Discovery Miles 17 440 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

With the strengthening focus worldwide on human rights, there has been a rapid increase in recent years in the number of countries that have completely abolished the death penalty. This is in recognition that it is a violation of the right to life and the right to be free from cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment. There has, simultaneously, been pressure on countries that still retain capital punishment to ensure that they at least apply the United Nations minimum human rights safeguards established to protect the rights of those facing the death penalty. This book shows that the majority of Asian countries have been particularly resistant to the abolitionist movement and tardy in accepting their responsibility to uphold the safeguards. The essays contained in this volume provide an in-depth analysis of changes in the scope and application of the death penalty in Asia with a focus on China, India, Japan, and Singapore. They explain the extent to which these nations still fail to accept capital punishment as a human rights issue, identify impediments to reform, and explore the prospects that Asian countries will eventually embrace the goal of worldwide abolition of capital punishment.

Mental Disability and the Death Penalty - The Shame of the States (Paperback): Michael L. Perlin Mental Disability and the Death Penalty - The Shame of the States (Paperback)
Michael L. Perlin
R367 Discovery Miles 3 670 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

There is no question that the death penalty is disproportionately imposed in cases involving defendants with mental disabilities. There is clear, systemic bias at all stages of the prosecution and the sentencing process - in determining who is competent to be executed, in the assessment of mitigation evidence, in the ways that counsel is assigned, in the ways that jury determinations are often contaminated by stereotyped preconceptions of persons with mental disabilities, in the ways that cynical expert testimony reflects a propensity on the part of some experts to purposely distort their testimony in order to achieve desired ends. These questions are shockingly ignored at all levels of the criminal justice system, and by society in general. Here, Michael Perlin explores the relationship between mental disabilities and the death penalty and explains why and how this state of affairs has come to be, to explore why it is necessary to identify the factors that have contributed to this scandalous and shameful policy morass, to highlight the series of policy choices that need immediate remediation, and to offer some suggestions that might meaningfully ameliorate the situation. Using real cases to illustrate the ways in which the persons with mental disabilities are unable to receive fair treatment during death penalty trials, he demonstrates the depth of the problem and the way it's been institutionalized so as to be an accepted part of our system. He calls for a new approach, and greater attention to the issues that have gone overlooked for so long.

The Death Penalty, v. 1 (Hardcover): Jacques Derrida The Death Penalty, v. 1 (Hardcover)
Jacques Derrida; Translated by Peggy Kamuf
R656 R607 Discovery Miles 6 070 Save R49 (7%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

In this newest installment in Chicago's series of Jacques Derrida's seminars, the renowned philosopher attempts one of his most ambitious goals: the first truly philosophical argument against the death penalty. While much has been written against the death penalty, Derrida contends that Western philosophy is massively, if not always obviously, complicit with a logic in which a sovereign state has the right to take a life. Haunted by this notion, he turns to the key places where such logic has been established - and to the place it has been most effectively challenged: literature. With his signature genius and patient yet dazzling readings of an impressive breadth of texts, Derrida examines everything from the Bible to Plato to Camus to Jean Genet, with special attention to Kant and post-World War II juridical texts, to draw the landscape of death penalty discourses. Keeping clearly in view the death rows and execution chambers of the United States, he shows how arguments surrounding cruel and unusual punishment depend on what he calls an "anaesthesial logic," which has also driven the development of death penalty technology from the French guillotine to lethal injection. Confronting a demand for philosophical rigor, he pursues provocative analyses of the shortcomings of abolitionist discourse. Above all, he argues that the death penalty and its attendant technologies are products of a desire to put an end to one of the most fundamental qualities of our finite existence: the radical uncertainty of when we will die. Arriving at a critical juncture in history - especially in the United States, one of the last Christian-inspired democracies to resist abolition - The Death Penalty is both a timely response to an important ethical debate and a timeless addition to Derrida's esteemed body of work.

Justice, Mercy, and Caprice - Clemency and the Death Penalty in Ireland (Hardcover): Ian O'Donnell Justice, Mercy, and Caprice - Clemency and the Death Penalty in Ireland (Hardcover)
Ian O'Donnell
R1,509 Discovery Miles 15 090 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Justice, Mercy, and Caprice is a work of criminal justice history that speaks to the gradual emergence of a more humane Irish state. It is a close examination of the decision to grant clemency to men and women sentenced to death between the end of the civil war in 1923 and the abolition of capital punishment in 1990. Frequently, the decision to deflect the law from its course was an attempt to introduce a measure of justice to a system where the mandatory death sentence for murder caused predictable unfairness and undue harshness. In some instances the decision to spare a life sprang from merciful motivations. In others it was capricious, depending on factors that should have had no place in the government's decision-making calculus. The custodial careers of those whose lives were spared repay scrutiny. Women tended to serve relatively short periods in prison but were often transferred to a religious institution where their confinement continued, occasionally for life. Men, by contrast, served longer in prison but were discharged directly to the community. Political offenders were either executed hastily or, when the threat of capital punishment had passed, incarcerated for extravagant periods. This book addresses issues that are of continuing relevance for countries that employ capital punishment. It will appeal to scholars with an interest in criminal justice history, executive discretion, and death penalty studies, as well as being a useful resource for students of penology.

Just Mercy - a story of justice and redemption (Paperback): Bryan Stevenson Just Mercy - a story of justice and redemption (Paperback)
Bryan Stevenson
R210 R166 Discovery Miles 1 660 Save R44 (21%) In stock

Named a Book of the Year by the New York Times, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Esquire, and Time The US has the highest rate of incarceration in the world. One in every 15 people born there today is expected to go to prison. For black men this figure rises to one in 3. And Death Row is disproportionately black, too. Bryan Stevenson grew up poor in the racially segregated South. His innate sense of justice made him a brilliant young lawyer, and one of his first defendants was Walter McMillian, a black man sentenced to die for the murder of a white woman - a crime he insisted he didn't commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, startling racial inequality, and legal brinksmanship - and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever. At once an unforgettable account of an idealistic lawyer's coming of age and a moving portrait of the lives of those he has defended, Just Mercy is an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of justice.

Ultimate Punishment - A Lawyer's Reflections on Dealing with the Death Penalty (Paperback, New edition): Scott Turow Ultimate Punishment - A Lawyer's Reflections on Dealing with the Death Penalty (Paperback, New edition)
Scott Turow 1
R205 R150 Discovery Miles 1 500 Save R55 (27%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

As a pioneer of the modern legal novel and a criminal lawyer, Scott Turow has been involved with the death penalty for more than a decade, including successfully representing two different men convicted in death-penalty prosecutions. In Ultimate Punishment, a vivid account of how his views on the death penalty have evolved, Turow describes his own experiences with capital punishment from his days as an impassioned young prosecutor to his recent service on the Illinois commission which investigated the administration of the death penalty and influenced Governor George Ryan's unprecedented commutation of the sentences of 164 death row inmates on his last day in office. Along the way, he provides a brief history of America's ambivalent relationship with the ultimate punishment, analyzes the potent reasons for and against it, including the role of the victims' survivors, and tells the powerful stories behind the statistics, as he moves from the Governor's Mansion to Illinois' state-of-the art 'super-max' prison and the execution chamber.

At the Cross - Race, Religion, and Citizenship in the Politics of the Death Penalty (Paperback): Melynda J Price At the Cross - Race, Religion, and Citizenship in the Politics of the Death Penalty (Paperback)
Melynda J Price
R740 Discovery Miles 7 400 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Curing systemic inequalities in the criminal justice system is the unfinished business of the Civil Rights movement. No part of that system highlights this truth more than the current implementation of the death penalty. At the Cross tells a story of the relationship between the death penalty and race in American politics that complicates the common belief that individual African Americans, especially poor African Americans, are more subject to the death penalty in criminal cases. The current death penalty regime operates quite differently than it did in the past. The findings of this research demonstrate the the racial inequity in the meting out of death sentences has legal and political externalities that move beyond individual defendants to larger numbers of African Americans. At the Cross looks at the meaning of the death penalty to and for African Americans by using various sites of analysis. Using various sites of analysis, Price shows the connection between criminal justice policies like the death penalty and the political and legal rights of African Americans who are tangentially connected to the criminal justice system through familial and social networks. Drawing on black politics, legal and political theory and narrative analysis, Price utilizes a mixed-method approach that incorporates analysis of media reports, capital jury selection and survey data, as well as original focus group data. As the rates of incarceration trend upward, Black politics scholars have focused on the impact of incarceration on the voting strength of the black community. Local, and even regional, narratives of African American politics and the death penalty expose the fractures in American democracy that foment perceptions of exclusion among blacks.

Reflections on Hanging (Paperback): Arthur Koestler Reflections on Hanging (Paperback)
Arthur Koestler; Preface by Edmond Cahn; Afterword by Sydney Silverman
R506 R397 Discovery Miles 3 970 Save R109 (22%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Reflections on Hanging is a searing indictment of capital punishment, inspired by its author's own time in the shadow of a firing squad. During the Spanish Civil War, Arthur Koestler was held by the Franco regime as a political prisoner, and condemned to death. He was freed, but only after months of witnessing the fates of less-fortunate inmates. That experience informs every page of the book, which was first published in England in 1956, and followed in 1957 by this American edition. As Koestler ranges across the history of capital punishment in Britain (with a focus on hanging), he looks at notable cases and rulings, and portrays politicians, judges, lawyers, scholars, clergymen, doctors, police, jailers, prisoners, and others involved in the long debate over the justness and effectiveness of the death penalty. In Britain, Reflections on Hanging was part of a concerted, ultimately successful effort to abolish the death penalty. At that time, in the forty-eight United States, capital punishment was sanctioned in forty-two of them, with hanging still practiced in five. This edition includes a preface and afterword written especially for the 1957 American edition. The preface makes the book relevant to readers in the U.S.; the afterword overviews the modern-day history of abolitionist legislation in the British Parliament. Reflections on Hanging is relentless, biting, and unsparing in its details of botched and unjust executions. It is a classic work of advocacy for some of society's most defenseless members, a critique of capital punishment that is still widely cited, and an enduring work that presaged such contemporary problems as the sensationalism of crime, the wrongful condemnation of the innocent and mentally ill, the callousness of penal systems, and the use of fear to control a citizenry.

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Vicki Schieber, Trudy D. Conway, … Paperback R364 R335 Discovery Miles 3 350
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