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Books > Humanities > History > American history > General

Not One Inch - America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate (Hardcover): M. E Sarotte Not One Inch - America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate (Hardcover)
M. E Sarotte
R635 R501 Discovery Miles 5 010 Save R134 (21%) In Stock

Not one inch. With these words, Secretary of State James Baker proposed a hypothetical bargain to Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev after the fall of the Berlin Wall: if you let your part of Germany go, we will move NATO not one inch eastward. Controversy erupted almost immediately over this 1990 exchange-but more important was the decade to come, when the words took on new meaning. Gorbachev let his Germany go, but Washington rethought the bargain, not least after the Soviet Union's own collapse in December 1991. Washington realized it could not just win big but win bigger. Not one inch of territory needed to be off limits to NATO. On the thirtieth anniversary of the Soviet collapse, this book uses new evidence and interviews to show how, in the decade that culminated in Vladimir Putin's rise to power, the United States and Russia undermined a potentially lasting partnership. Prize-winning historian M. E. Sarotte shows what went wrong.

The Sweetness of Water - Longlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize (Paperback): Nathan Harris The Sweetness of Water - Longlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize (Paperback)
Nathan Harris
R215 R172 Discovery Miles 1 720 Save R43 (20%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

**LONGLISTED FOR THE 2021 BOOKER PRIZE** A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER AND BARACK OBAMA SUMMER READING 2021 SELECTION 'A fine, lyrical novel, impressive in its complex interweaving of the grand and the intimate, of the personal and political' Observer In the dying days of the American Civil War, newly freed brothers Landry and Prentiss find themselves cast into the world without a penny to their names. Forced to hide out in the woods near their former Georgia plantation, they're soon discovered by the land's owner, George Walker, a man still reeling from the loss of his son in the war. When the brothers begin to live and work on George's farm, the tentative bonds of trust and union begin to blossom between the strangers. But this sanctuary survives on a knife's edge, and it isn't long before the inhabitants of the nearby town of Old Ox react with fury at the alliances being formed only a few miles away . . . An Oprah Book Club Pick '[A] highly accomplished debut' Sunday Times Readers have been swept away by The Sweetness of Water: 'Such a powerful, magnificent book; I urge you to read it. The comparisons with Colson Whitehead are justified' ***** 'A staggering debut and a story that stays with you' ***** 'Thought-provoking and moving . . . a gripping and compelling novel that exposes flaws, mixed emotions and imperfect relationships, and yet it holds on with determination and hope. It fully deserves a 5-star rating' ***** 'Outstanding . . . A book that deserves widespread recognition and a wide audience' *****

Team America - Patton, Macarthur, Marshall, Eisenhower, and the World They Forged (Hardcover): Robert L. O'Connell Team America - Patton, Macarthur, Marshall, Eisenhower, and the World They Forged (Hardcover)
Robert L. O'Connell
R692 R584 Discovery Miles 5 840 Save R108 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Concepcion - An Immigrant Family's Fortunes (Hardcover): Albert Samaha Concepcion - An Immigrant Family's Fortunes (Hardcover)
Albert Samaha
R650 R551 Discovery Miles 5 510 Save R99 (15%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
I Wanna Do That! - The Magic of Mardi Gras Marching Krewes (Hardcover): Echo Olander, Yehonathan Goldstein I Wanna Do That! - The Magic of Mardi Gras Marching Krewes (Hardcover)
Echo Olander, Yehonathan Goldstein; Photographs by Ryan Hodgson-Rigsbee, Patrick Niddrie
R787 Discovery Miles 7 870 Ships in 12 - 17 working days
America on Fire - The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s (Hardcover): Elizabeth Hinton America on Fire - The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s (Hardcover)
Elizabeth Hinton
R517 Discovery Miles 5 170 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

What began in spring 2020 as local protests in response to the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police quickly exploded into a massive nationwide movement. Millions of mostly young people defiantly flooded into the nation's streets, demanding an end to police brutality and to the broader, systemic repression of Black people and other people of color. To many observers, the protests appeared to be without precedent in their scale and persistence. Yet, as the acclaimed historian Elizabeth Hinton demonstrates in America on Fire, the events of 2020 had clear precursors-and any attempt to understand our current crisis requires a reckoning with the recent past. Even in the aftermath of Donald Trump, many Americans consider the decades since the civil rights movement in the mid-1960s as a story of progress toward greater inclusiveness and equality. Hinton's sweeping narrative uncovers an altogether different history, taking us on a troubling journey from Detroit in 1967 and Miami in 1980 to Los Angeles in 1992 and beyond to chart the persistence of structural racism and one of its primary consequences, the so-called urban riot. Hinton offers a critical corrective: the word riot was nothing less than a racist trope applied to events that can only be properly understood as rebellions-explosions of collective resistance to an unequal and violent order. As she suggests, if rebellion and the conditions that precipitated it never disappeared, the optimistic story of a post-Jim Crow United States no longer holds. Black rebellion, America on Fire powerfully illustrates, was born in response to poverty and exclusion, but most immediately in reaction to police violence. In 1968, President Lyndon Johnson launched the "War on Crime," sending militarized police forces into impoverished Black neighborhoods. Facing increasing surveillance and brutality, residents threw rocks and Molotov cocktails at officers, plundered local businesses, and vandalized exploitative institutions. Hinton draws on exclusive sources to uncover a previously hidden geography of violence in smaller American cities, from York, Pennsylvania, to Cairo, Illinois, to Stockton, California. The central lesson from these eruptions-that police violence invariably leads to community violence-continues to escape policymakers, who respond by further criminalizing entire groups instead of addressing underlying socioeconomic causes. The results are the hugely expanded policing and prison regimes that shape the lives of so many Americans today. Presenting a new framework for understanding our nation's enduring strife, America on Fire is also a warning: rebellions will surely continue unless police are no longer called on to manage the consequences of dismal conditions beyond their control, and until an oppressive system is finally remade on the principles of justice and equality.

Twice Forgotten - African Americans and the Korean War, an Oral History (Hardcover): David P Cline Twice Forgotten - African Americans and the Korean War, an Oral History (Hardcover)
David P Cline
R726 R608 Discovery Miles 6 080 Save R118 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Journalists began to call the Korean War "the Forgotten War" even before it ended. Without a doubt, the most neglected story of this already-neglected war is that of African Americans who served just two years after Harry S. Truman ordered the desegregation of the military. Twice Forgotten draws on oral histories of Black Korean War veterans to recover the story of their contributions to the fight, the reality that the military& desegregated in fits and starts, and how veterans' service fits into the long history of the Black freedom struggle. This collection of seventy oral histories, drawn from across the country, features interviews conducted by the author and his colleagues for their 2003 American Radio Works documentary, Korea: The Unfinished War, which examines the conflict as experienced by the approximately 600,000 Black men and women who served. It also includes narratives from other sources, including the Library of Congress's visionary Veterans History Project. In their own voices, soldiers and sailors and flyers tell the story of what it meant, how it felt, and what it cost them to fight for the freedom abroad that was too often denied them at home.

Why Cuba Matters - New Threats in America's Backyard (Hardcover): Nestor T Carbonell Why Cuba Matters - New Threats in America's Backyard (Hardcover)
Nestor T Carbonell
R664 Discovery Miles 6 640 Ships in 12 - 17 working days
Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument (Paperback): Eric E Hendrickson Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument (Paperback)
Eric E Hendrickson
R496 R426 Discovery Miles 4 260 Save R70 (14%) Special order
The King of Confidence - A Tale of Utopian Dreamers, Frontier Schemers, True Believers, False Prophets, and the Murder of an... The King of Confidence - A Tale of Utopian Dreamers, Frontier Schemers, True Believers, False Prophets, and the Murder of an American Monarch (Paperback)
Miles Harvey
R429 R368 Discovery Miles 3 680 Save R61 (14%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
The Family Roe - An American Story (Hardcover): Joshua Prager The Family Roe - An American Story (Hardcover)
Joshua Prager
R868 R735 Discovery Miles 7 350 Save R133 (15%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Despite her famous pseudonym, "Jane Roe," no one knows the truth about Norma McCorvey (1947-2017), whose unwanted pregnancy in 1969 opened a great fracture in American life. Journalist Joshua Prager spent hundreds of hours with Norma, discovered her personal papers-a previously unseen trove-and witnessed her final moments. The Family Roe presents her life in full. Propelled by the crosscurrents of sex and religion, gender and class, it is a life that tells the story of abortion in America. Prager begins that story on the banks of Louisiana's Atchafalaya River where Norma was born, and where unplanned pregnancies upended generations of her forebears. A pregnancy then upended Norma's life too, and the Dallas waitress became Jane Roe. Drawing on a decade of research, Prager reveals the woman behind the pseudonym, writing in novelistic detail of her unknown life from her time as a sex worker in Dallas, to her private thoughts on family and abortion, to her dealings with feminist and Christian leaders, to the three daughters she placed for adoption. Prager found those women, including the youngest-Baby Roe-now fifty years old. She shares her story in The Family Roe for the first time, from her tortured interactions with her birth mother, to her emotional first meeting with her sisters, to the burden that was uniquely hers from conception. The Family Roe abounds in such revelations-not only about Norma and her children but about the broader "family" connected to the case. Prager tells the stories of activists and bystanders alike whose lives intertwined with Roe. In particular, he introduces three figures as important as they are unknown: feminist lawyer Linda Coffee, who filed the original Texas lawsuit yet now lives in obscurity; Curtis Boyd, a former fundamentalist Christian, today a leading provider of third-trimester abortions; and Mildred Jefferson, the first black female Harvard Medical School graduate, who became a pro-life leader with great secrets. An epic work spanning fifty years of American history, The Family Roe will change the way you think about our enduring American divide: the right to choose or the right to life.

Tom Horn in Life and Legend (Paperback): Larry D Ball Tom Horn in Life and Legend (Paperback)
Larry D Ball
R621 R537 Discovery Miles 5 370 Save R84 (14%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Some of the legendary gunmen of the Old West were lawmen, but more, like Billy the Kid and Jesse James, were outlaws. Tom Horn (1860-1903) was both. Lawman, soldier, hired gunman, detective, outlaw, and assassin, this darkly enigmatic figure has fascinated Americans ever since his death by hanging the day before his forty-third birthday. In this masterful historical biography, Larry Ball, a distinguished historian of western lawmen and outlaws, presents the definitive account of Horn's career. Horn became a civilian in the Apache wars when he was still in his early twenties. He fought in the last major battle with the Apaches on U.S. soil and chased the Indians into Mexico with General George Crook. He bragged about murdering renegades, and the brutality of his approach to law and order foreshadows his controversial career as a Pinkerton detective and his trial for murder in Wyoming. Having worked as a hired gun and a range detective in the years after the Johnson County War, he was eventually tried and hanged for killing a fourteen-year-old boy. Horn's guilt is still debated. To an extent no previous scholar has managed to achieve, Ball distinguishes the truth about Horn from the numerous legends. Both the facts and their distortions are revealing, especially since so many of the untruths come from Horn's own autobiography. As a teller of tall tales, Horn burnished his own reputation throughout his life. In spite of his services as a civilian scout and packer, his behavior frightened even his lawless companions. Although some writers have tried to elevate him to the top rung of frontier gun wielders, questions still shadow Horn's reputation. Ball's study concludes with a survey of Horn as described by historians, novelists, and screenwriters since his own time. These portrayals, as mixed as the facts on which they are based, show a continuing fascination with the life and legend of Tom Horn.

Fifty Years in Public Health - A Personal Narrative with Comments (Hardcover): Sir Arthur Newsholme Fifty Years in Public Health - A Personal Narrative with Comments (Hardcover)
Sir Arthur Newsholme
R4,219 Discovery Miles 42 190 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

First published in 1935, this book provides a valuable contribution to the history of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. Written as a recollection of the experiences and knowledge of Sir Arthur Newsholme, the book covers a period in which phenomenal progress was made.

White Too Long - The Legacy of White Supremacy in American Christianity (Paperback): Robert P. Jones White Too Long - The Legacy of White Supremacy in American Christianity (Paperback)
Robert P. Jones
R376 R321 Discovery Miles 3 210 Save R55 (15%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
The American Chestnut - An Environmental History (Hardcover): Donald Edward Davis The American Chestnut - An Environmental History (Hardcover)
Donald Edward Davis
R741 R618 Discovery Miles 6 180 Save R123 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Before 1910 the American chestnut was one of the most common trees in the eastern United States. Although historical evidence suggests the natural distribution of the American chestnut extended across more than four hundred thousand square miles of territory-an area stretching from eastern Maine to southeast Louisiana-stands of the trees could also be found in parts of Wisconsin, Michigan, Washington State, and Oregon. An important natural resource, chestnut wood was preferred for woodworking, fencing, and building construction, as it was rot resistant and straight grained. The hearty and delicious nuts also fed wildlife, people, and livestock. Ironically, the tree that most piqued the emotions of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Americans has virtually disappeared from the eastern United States. After a blight fungus was introduced into the United States during the late nineteenth century, the American chestnut became functionally extinct. Although the virtual eradication of the species caused one of the greatest ecological catastrophes since the last ice age, considerable folklore about the American chestnut remains. Some of the tree's history dates to the very founding of our country, making the story of the American chestnut an integral part of American cultural and environmental history. The American Chestnut tells the story of the American chestnut from Native American prehistory through the Civil War and the Great Depression. Davis documents the tree's impact on nineteenth-and early twentieth-century American life, including the decorative and culinary arts. While he pays much attention to the importation of chestnut blight and the tree's decline as a dominant species, the author also evaluates efforts to restore the American chestnut to its former place in the eastern deciduous forest, including modern attempts to genetically modify the species. Accessible and well illustrated, this comprehensive history includes chapters on: the evolutionary history of the species the impact of chestnuts on Native American culture Henry David Thoreau's relationship with the tree uses in furniture making, building construction, tanning, and cityscaping the true origins of the chestnut blight fungus the U.S. chestnut revival and restoration efforts genetic resistance and the use of biotechnology to save the species

Life of a Klansman - A Family History in White Supremacy (Paperback): Edward Ball Life of a Klansman - A Family History in White Supremacy (Paperback)
Edward Ball
R441 R377 Discovery Miles 3 770 Save R64 (15%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
W.E.B. Du Bois - Revolutionary across the color line (Paperback): Bill V. Mullen W.E.B. Du Bois - Revolutionary across the color line (Paperback)
Bill V. Mullen
R290 R249 Discovery Miles 2 490 Save R41 (14%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

On the 27th August, 1963, the day before Martin Luther King electrified the world from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial with the immortal words, "I Have a Dream", the life of another giant of the Civil Rights movement quietly drew to a close in Accra, Ghana: W.E.B. Du Bois. In this new biography, Bill V. Mullen interprets the seismic political developments of the Twentieth Century through Du Bois's revolutionary life. Du Bois was born in Massachusetts in 1868, just three years after formal emancipation of America's slaves. In his extraordinarily long and active political life, he would emerge as the first black man to earn a PhD from Harvard; surpass Booker T. Washington as the leading advocate for African American rights; co-found the NAACP, and involve himself in anti imperialist and anti-colonial struggles across Asia and Africa. Beyond his Civil Rights work, Mullen also examines Du Bois's attitudes towards socialism, the USSR, China's Communist Revolution, and the intersectional relationship between capitalism, poverty and racism. An accessible introduction to a towering figure of American Civil Rights, perfect for anyone wanting to engage with Du Bois's life and work.

Born of Lakes and Plains - Mixed-Descent Peoples and the Making of the American West (Hardcover): Anne F. Hyde Born of Lakes and Plains - Mixed-Descent Peoples and the Making of the American West (Hardcover)
Anne F. Hyde
R889 R731 Discovery Miles 7 310 Save R158 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Often overlooked, there is mixed blood at the heart of America. And at the heart of Native life for centuries there were complex households using intermarriage to link disparate communities and create protective circles of kin. Beginning in the seventeenth century, Native peoples-Ojibwes, Otoes, Cheyennes, Chinooks, and others-formed new families with young French, English, Canadian, and American fur traders who spent months in smoky winter lodges or at boisterous summer rendezvous. These families built cosmopolitan trade centers from Michilimackinac on the Great Lakes to Bellevue on the Missouri River, Bent's Fort in the southern Plains, and Fort Vancouver in the Pacific Northwest. Their family names are often imprinted on the landscape, but their voices have long been muted in our histories. Anne F. Hyde's pathbreaking history restores them in full. Vividly combining the panoramic and the particular, Born of Lakes and Plains follows five mixed-descent families whose lives intertwined major events: imperial battles over the fur trade; the first extensions of American authority west of the Appalachians; the ravages of imported disease; the violence of Indian removal; encroaching American settlement; and, following the Civil War, the disasters of Indian war, reservations policy, and allotment. During the pivotal nineteenth century, mixed-descent people who had once occupied a middle ground became a racial problem drawing hostility from all sides. Their identities were challenged by the pseudo-science of blood quantum-the instrument of allotment policy-and their traditions by the Indian schools established to erase Native ways. As Anne F. Hyde shows, they navigated the hard choices they faced as they had for centuries: by relying on the rich resources of family and kin. Here is an indelible western history with a new human face.

Frank Porter Graham - Southern Liberal, Citizen of the World (Hardcover): William A Link Frank Porter Graham - Southern Liberal, Citizen of the World (Hardcover)
William A Link
R735 R601 Discovery Miles 6 010 Save R134 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Frank Porter Graham (1886-1972) was one of the most consequential white southerners of the twentieth century. Born in Fayetteville and raised in Charlotte, Graham became an active and popular student leader at the University of North Carolina. After earning a graduate degree from Columbia University and serving as a marine during World War I, he taught history at UNC, and in 1930, he became the university's fifteenth president. Affectionately known as "Dr. Frank," Graham spent two decades overseeing UNC's development into a world-class public institution. But he regularly faced controversy, especially as he was increasingly drawn into national leadership on matters such as intellectual freedom and the rights of workers. As a southern liberal, Graham became a prominent New Dealer, negotiator, and briefly a U.S. senator. Graham's reputation for problem solving through compromise led him into service under several presidents as a United Nations mediator, and he was outspoken as a white southerner regarding civil rights. Brimming with fresh insights, this definitive biography reveals how a personally modest public servant took his place on the national and world stage and, along the way, helped transform North Carolina.

A Shot to Save the World - The Inside Story of the Life-or-Death Race for a COVID-19 Vaccine (Hardcover): Gregory Zuckerman A Shot to Save the World - The Inside Story of the Life-or-Death Race for a COVID-19 Vaccine (Hardcover)
Gregory Zuckerman
R547 R387 Discovery Miles 3 870 Save R160 (29%) Ships in 12 - 17 working days
The Child in the Electric Chair - The Execution of George Junius Stinney Jr. and the Making of a Tragedy in the American South... The Child in the Electric Chair - The Execution of George Junius Stinney Jr. and the Making of a Tragedy in the American South (Hardcover)
Eli Faber; Foreword by Carol Berkin
R650 R542 Discovery Miles 5 420 Save R108 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

At 7:30 a.m. on June 16, 1944, George Junius Stinney Jr. was escorted by four guards to the death chamber. Wearing socks but no shoes, the 14-year-old Black boy walked with his Bible tucked under his arm. The guards strapped his slight, five-foot-one-inch frame into the electric chair. His small size made it difficult to affix the electrode to his right leg and the face mask, which was clearly too large, fell to the floor when the executioner flipped the switch. That day, George Stinney became, and today remains, the youngest person executed in the United States during the twentieth century.How was it possible, even in Jim Crow South Carolina, for a child to be convicted, sentenced to death, and executed based on circumstantial evidence in a trial that lasted only a few hours? Through extensive archival research and interviews with Stinney's contemporaries-men and women alive today who still carry distinctive memories of the events that rocked the small town of Alcolu and the entire state-Eli Faber pieces together the chain of events that led to this tragic injustice. The first book to fully explore the events leading to Stinney's death, The Child in the Electric Chair offers a compelling narrative with a meticulously researched analysis of the world in which Stinney lived-the era of lynching, segregation, and racist assumptions about Black Americans. Faber explains how a systemically racist system, paired with the personal ambitions of powerful individuals, turned a blind eye to human decency and one of the basic tenets of the American legal system that individuals are innocent until proven guilty. As society continues to grapple with the legacies of racial injustice, the story of George Stinney remains one that can teach us lessons about our collective past and present. By ably placing the Stinney case into a larger context, Faber reveals how this case is not just a travesty of justice locked in the era of the Jim Crow South but rather one that continues to resonate in our own time. A foreword is provided by Carol Berkin, Presidential Professor of History Emerita at Baruch College at the City University of New York and author of several books including Civil War Wives: The Lives and Times of Angelina Grimke Weld, Varina Howell Davis, and Julia Dent Grant.

The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition (Hardcover): ' Salish-Pend d'Oreille Culture Committee The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition (Hardcover)
' Salish-Pend d'Oreille Culture Committee
R822 R689 Discovery Miles 6 890 Save R133 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

On September 4, 1805, in the upper Bitterroot Valley of what is now western Montana, more than four hundred Salish people were encamped, pasturing horses, preparing for the fall bison hunt, and harvesting chokecherries as they had done for countless generations. As the Lewis and Clark expedition ventured into the territory of a sovereign Native nation, the Salish met the weary explorers with hospitality and vital provisions, while receiving comparatively little in return. For the first time, a Native American community offers an in-depth examination of the events and historical significance of their encounter with the Lewis and Clark expedition. The result is a new understanding of the expedition and its place in the wider context of U.S. history. Through oral histories and other materials, Salish elders recount the details of the Salish encounter with Lewis and Clark - their difficulty communicating with the strangers through multiple interpreters and consequent misunderstanding of the expedition's invasionary purpose, their discussions about whether to welcome or wipe out the newcomers, their puzzlement over the black skin of the slave York, and their decision to extend traditional tribal hospitality and gifts to the guests. What makes "The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition" a startling departure from previous accounts of the Lewis and Clark expedition is how it depicts the arrival of non-Indians - not as the beginning of history but as another chapter in a long tribal history. Much of this book focuses on the ancient cultural landscape and history that had already shaped the region for millennia prior to the arrival of Lewis and Clark. The elders begin their vivid portrait of the Salish world by sharing creation stories and the traditional cycle of life. The book then takes readers on a cultural tour of the Native trails that the expedition followed. With tribal elders as our guides, we now learn of the Salish cultural landscape that was invisible to Lewis and Clark. "The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition" also brings new clarity to the profound upheaval of the Native world in the century prior to the expedition's arrival, as tribes in the region were introduced to horses, European diseases, and firearms. The arrival of Lewis and Clark marked the beginning of a heightened level of conflict and loss, and the book details the history that followed the expedition: the opening of Salish territory to the fur trade, the arrival of Jesuit missionaries, the establishment of Indian reservations, the non-Indian development of western Montana, and more recently, the revival and strengthening of tribal sovereignty and culture. Conveyed by tribal recollections and richly illustrated, "The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition" not only sheds new light on the meaning of the expedition, but also illuminates the people who greeted Lewis and Clark, and despite much of what followed, thrive in their homeland today.

Index, A History of the - A Bookish Adventure from Medieval Manuscripts to the Digital Age (Hardcover): Dennis Duncan Index, A History of the - A Bookish Adventure from Medieval Manuscripts to the Digital Age (Hardcover)
Dennis Duncan
R696 R588 Discovery Miles 5 880 Save R108 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Most of us give little thought to the back of the book-it's just where you go to look things up. But as Dennis Duncan reveals in this delightful and witty history, hiding in plain sight is an unlikely realm of ambition and obsession, sparring and politicking, pleasure and play. In the pages of the index, we might find Butchers, to be avoided, or Cows that sh-te Fire, or even catch Calvin in his chamber with a Nonne. Here, for the first time, is the secret world of the index: an unsung but extraordinary everyday tool, with an illustrious but little-known past. Charting its curious path from the monasteries and universities of thirteenth-century Europe to Silicon Valley in the twenty-first, Duncan uncovers how it has saved heretics from the stake, kept politicians from high office, and made us all into the readers we are today. We follow it through German print shops and Enlightenment coffee houses, novelists' living rooms and university laboratories, encountering emperors and popes, philosophers and prime ministers, poets, librarians and-of course-indexers along the way. Revealing its vast role in our evolving literary and intellectual culture, Duncan shows that, for all our anxieties about the Age of Search, we are all index-rakers at heart-and we have been for eight hundred years.

The Enlightenment in America, 1720-1825 (Hardcover): Jose R. Torre The Enlightenment in America, 1720-1825 (Hardcover)
Jose R. Torre
R12,415 Discovery Miles 124 150 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

So far, the body of work on the American Enlightenment has focused almost exclusively on two areas - politics and religion. In contrast, scholars have paid little attention to the polyglot efforts of American doctors, scientists, engineers, botanists, poets and other Enlightenment actor. This work fills this significant gap.

Citizens and Rulers of the World - The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire (Paperback): Mahshid Mayar Citizens and Rulers of the World - The American Child and the Cartographic Pedagogies of Empire (Paperback)
Mahshid Mayar
R828 Discovery Miles 8 280 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

By delving into the complex, cross-generational exchanges that characterize any political project as rampant as empire, this thought-provoking study focuses on children and their ambivalent, intimate relationships with maps and practices of mapping at the dawn of the "American Century." Considering children as students, map and puzzle makers, letter writers, and playmates, Mahshid Mayar interrogates the ways turn-of-the-century American children encountered, made sense of, and produced spatial narratives and cognitive maps of the United States and the world. Mayar further probes how children's diverse patterns of consuming, relating to, and appropriating the "truths" that maps represent turned cartography into a site of personal and political contention. To investigate where in the world the United States imagined itself at the end of the nineteenth century, this book calls for new modes of mapping the United States as it studies the nation on regional, hemispheric, and global scales. By examining the multilayered liaison between imperial pedagogy and geopolitical literacy across a wide range of archival evidence, Mayar delivers a careful microhistorical study of U.S. empire.

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