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Books > Humanities > History > American history > General

The Dominican Republic - A National History (Hardcover, 3rd Updated and Expanded ed.): The Dominican Republic - A National History (Hardcover, 3rd Updated and Expanded ed.)
R2,376 Discovery Miles 23 760 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

This updated and expanded edition extends the narrative from 1990 to the first decade of the present century, beginning with the collapse of the Dominican economy. In addition to the electoral fraud and constitutional reforms of 1994 and the return administration of Leonel Fernandez, the updated chapters focus on financial crises, the economic reforms of the 1990s, the free trade agreement with the United States, and party politics. They also take account of the recent Dominican electoral processes, the colossal and fraudulent banking crisis of 2002-2004, and the perpetuation of corruption as part of Dominican political culture.

I Would Rather Sleep in Texas - A History of the Lower Rio Grande Valley  and the People of the Santa Anita Land Grant... I Would Rather Sleep in Texas - A History of the Lower Rio Grande Valley and the People of the Santa Anita Land Grant (Paperback)
Mary Margaret McAllen Amberson, James A. McAllen, Margaret H. McAllen
R987 Discovery Miles 9 870 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

This superb work of history tells the story of the Lower Rio Grande Valley and the people who struggled to make this daunting land their home. Spanish conquistadors and Mexican revolutionaries, cowboys and ranchers, Texas Rangers and Civil War generals, entrepreneurs and empire builders are all a part of this centuries-long saga, thoroughly researched and skillfully presented here. In this moving account of the history of the families of the Santa Anita land grant, almost two hundred years of the history of the lower Rio Grande Valley (1748-1940) are revealed. An important addition to any collection of Texas history, ""I Would Rather Sleep in Texas"" is one of the most complete studies of the lower Rio Grande, abundantly illustrated with maps and photographs, many never before published. In 1790 the Santa Anita, a Spanish land grant, was awarded to merchant Jose Manuel Gomez. After the land passed to Gomez's widow, part of the grant was acquired by Mar'a Salome Ball, the daughter of a powerful Spanish clan. Salome married John Young, and her family connections combined with his business acumen helped to further assemble the Santa Anita under one owner. In 1859, after Young's death, Salome struggled to hold onto her properties amid bandit raids and the siege of violence waged in the region by borderland caudillo Juan Cortina. Soon after the beginning of the Civil War, she married John McAllen. They participated in the rapid wartime cotton trade and developed influential business connections. Rare firsthand accounts by Salome Ball Young de McAllen, John McAllen, and their son, James Ball McAllen, add to a deeper understanding of the blending of the region's frontier cultures, rowdy politics, and periodic violence.

Tony Hillerman - A Life (Hardcover): James McGrath Morris Tony Hillerman - A Life (Hardcover)
James McGrath Morris
R655 R549 Discovery Miles 5 490 Save R106 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The author of eighteen spellbinding detective novels set on the Navajo Nation, Tony Hillerman simultaneously transformed a traditional genre and unlocked the mysteries of the Navajo culture to an audience of millions. His best-selling novels added Navajo Tribal Police detectives Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee to the pantheon of American fictional detectives. Morris offers a balanced portrait of Hillerman's personal and professional life and provides a timely appreciation of his work. In intimate detail, Morris captures the author's early years in Depression-era Oklahoma; his near-death experience in World War II; his sixty-year marriage to Marie; his family life, including six children, five of them adopted; his work in the trenches of journalism; his affliction with PTSD and its connection to his enchantment with Navajo spirituality; and his ascension as one of America's best-known authors of mysteries. Further, Morris uncovers the almost accidental invention of Hillerman's iconic detective Joe Leaphorn and the circumstances that led to the addition of Jim Chee as his partner. Hillerman's novels were not without controversy. Morris examines the charges of cultural appropriation leveled at the author toward the end of his life. Yet, for many readers, including many Native Americans, Hillerman deserves critical acclaim for his knowledgeable and sensitive portrayal of DinE (Navajo) history, culture, and identity. At the time of Hillerman's death, more than 20 million copies of his books were in print, and his novels inspired Robert Redford to adapt them to film. In weaving together all the elements of the author's life, Morris drew on the untapped collection of the author's papers, extensive archival research, interviews with friends, colleagues, and family, as well as travel in the Navajo Nation. Filled with never-before-told anecdotes and fresh insights, Tony Hillerman will thrill the author's fans and awaken new interest in his life and literary legacy.

The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition (Hardcover): ' Salish-Pend d'Oreille Culture Committee The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition (Hardcover)
' Salish-Pend d'Oreille Culture Committee
R802 R670 Discovery Miles 6 700 Save R132 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

On September 4, 1805, in the upper Bitterroot Valley of what is now western Montana, more than four hundred Salish people were encamped, pasturing horses, preparing for the fall bison hunt, and harvesting chokecherries as they had done for countless generations. As the Lewis and Clark expedition ventured into the territory of a sovereign Native nation, the Salish met the weary explorers with hospitality and vital provisions, while receiving comparatively little in return. For the first time, a Native American community offers an in-depth examination of the events and historical significance of their encounter with the Lewis and Clark expedition. The result is a new understanding of the expedition and its place in the wider context of U.S. history. Through oral histories and other materials, Salish elders recount the details of the Salish encounter with Lewis and Clark - their difficulty communicating with the strangers through multiple interpreters and consequent misunderstanding of the expedition's invasionary purpose, their discussions about whether to welcome or wipe out the newcomers, their puzzlement over the black skin of the slave York, and their decision to extend traditional tribal hospitality and gifts to the guests. What makes "The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition" a startling departure from previous accounts of the Lewis and Clark expedition is how it depicts the arrival of non-Indians - not as the beginning of history but as another chapter in a long tribal history. Much of this book focuses on the ancient cultural landscape and history that had already shaped the region for millennia prior to the arrival of Lewis and Clark. The elders begin their vivid portrait of the Salish world by sharing creation stories and the traditional cycle of life. The book then takes readers on a cultural tour of the Native trails that the expedition followed. With tribal elders as our guides, we now learn of the Salish cultural landscape that was invisible to Lewis and Clark. "The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition" also brings new clarity to the profound upheaval of the Native world in the century prior to the expedition's arrival, as tribes in the region were introduced to horses, European diseases, and firearms. The arrival of Lewis and Clark marked the beginning of a heightened level of conflict and loss, and the book details the history that followed the expedition: the opening of Salish territory to the fur trade, the arrival of Jesuit missionaries, the establishment of Indian reservations, the non-Indian development of western Montana, and more recently, the revival and strengthening of tribal sovereignty and culture. Conveyed by tribal recollections and richly illustrated, "The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition" not only sheds new light on the meaning of the expedition, but also illuminates the people who greeted Lewis and Clark, and despite much of what followed, thrive in their homeland today.

Lunar Outfitters - Making the Apollo Space Suit (Hardcover): Bill Ayrey Lunar Outfitters - Making the Apollo Space Suit (Hardcover)
Bill Ayrey
R1,024 R859 Discovery Miles 8 590 Save R165 (16%) Ships in 12 - 17 working days

The design processes behind a giant leap for mankind. Neil Armstrong in a space suit on the moon remains an iconic representation of America's technological ingenuity. Few know that the Model A-7L pressure suit worn by the Apollo 11 astronauts, and the Model A-7LB that replaced it in 1971, originated at ILC Industries (now ILC Dover, LP), an obscure Delaware industrial firm.Longtime ILC space suit test engineer Bill Ayrey draws on original files and photographs to tell the dramatic story of the company's role in the Apollo Program. Though respected for its early designs, ILC failed to win NASA's faith. When the government called for new suit concepts in 1965, ILC had to plead for consideration before NASA gave it a mere six weeks to come up with a radically different design. ILC not only met the deadline but won the contract. That underdog success led to its greatest challenge: winning a race against time to create a suit that would determine the success or failure of the Apollo missions-and life or death for the astronauts. A fascinating behind-the-scenes history of a vital component of the space program, Lunar Outfitters goes inside the suit that made it possible for human beings to set foot on the Moon.

The Spurs (Hardcover): W J Elliot The Spurs (Hardcover)
W J Elliot; Introduction by Eric Swenson
R627 Discovery Miles 6 270 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Save for a very few, the true West Texas cowboy has ridden his last round - up. Gone are the dusty trail drive, the remote line camps, the fence riders, the open pasture brandings, and the chuck wagons. But stories of those bygone days remain, albeit far too few. Fortunately, a handful of those cowboys were also of the literary type. "Scotch Bill" Elliot was one of those. He had the foresight to record those stories for posterity. Without Elliot and those like him, much of the history of the settling of West Texas would have been lost.
Elliot's subjects were varied--from the killing of the last buffalo to the end of the open range, from searing droughts to winter blizzards, from lush pastures to barren prairies, from good cow horses and good companions to bad deeds done by bad men. Perhaps the greatest contribution of Elliot's book is the numerous insightful profiles of cowboys and cattlemen. The American cowboy is always remembered as an unrivaled folk hero who possessed all of the qualities that people most admire. Elliot holds the cowboy and his lifestyle in the highest esteem, but he strips away the myth and writes forthrightly about that way of life.
This is not a scholarly treatise, being thoroughly researched and meticulously documented. This is an eyewitness account by a man who lived the history and simply recorded the events as they unfolded during his lifetime. If you want a recitation of cold facts frequently punctuated by dates, this is not your book. This volume is earthy, sometimes even crude, but it tells of life the way it really was on the West Texas range. For all who want to know about the life of the cowboy and the cattlemen, the day-to-day drudgery of ranch work, ranch cooking, cowboy customs, relations with "nesters," cowboy pranksters and recreation, and the satisfaction and exhilaration of sittin' on good horse flesh driving a herd of well - bred cattle to lush pastures--this is your book.--Eric Swenson
Save for a very few, the true West Texas cowboy has ridden his last round-up. Gone are the dusty trail drive, the remote line camps, the fence riders, the open pasture brandings, and the chuck wagons. But stories of those bygone days remain, albeit far too few. Fortunately, a handful of those cowboys were also of the literary type. "Scotch Bill" Elliot was one of those. He had the foresight to record those stories for posterity. Without Elliot and those like him, much of the history of the settling of West Texas would have been lost.
Elliot's subjects were varied--from the killing of the last buffalo to the end of the open range, from searing droughts to winter blizzards, from lush pastures to barren prairies, from good cow horses and good companions to bad deeds done by bad men. Perhaps the greatest contribution of Elliot's book is the numerous insightful profiles of cowboys and cattlemen. The American cowboy is always remembered as an unrivaled folk hero who possessed all of the qualities that people most admire. Elliot holds the cowboy and his lifestyle in the highest esteem, but he strips away the myth and writes forthrightly about that way of life.
This is not a scholarly treatise, being thoroughly researched and meticulously documented. This is an eyewitness account by a man who lived the history and simply recorded the events as they unfolded during his lifetime. If you want a recitation of cold facts frequently punctuated by dates, this is not your book. This volume is earthy, sometimes even crude, but it tells of life the way it really was on the West Texas range. For all who want to know about the life of the cowboy and the cattlemen, the day-to-day drudgery of ranch work, ranch cooking, cowboy customs, relations with "nesters," cowboy pranksters and recreation, and the satisfaction and exhilaration of sittin' on good horse flesh driving a herd of well-bred cattle to lush pastures--this is your book.--Eric Swenson

Frank Porter Graham - Southern Liberal, Citizen of the World (Hardcover): William A Link Frank Porter Graham - Southern Liberal, Citizen of the World (Hardcover)
William A Link
R717 R585 Discovery Miles 5 850 Save R132 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Frank Porter Graham (1886-1972) was one of the most consequential white southerners of the twentieth century. Born in Fayetteville and raised in Charlotte, Graham became an active and popular student leader at the University of North Carolina. After earning a graduate degree from Columbia University and serving as a marine during World War I, he taught history at UNC, and in 1930, he became the university's fifteenth president. Affectionately known as "Dr. Frank," Graham spent two decades overseeing UNC's development into a world-class public institution. But he regularly faced controversy, especially as he was increasingly drawn into national leadership on matters such as intellectual freedom and the rights of workers. As a southern liberal, Graham became a prominent New Dealer, negotiator, and briefly a U.S. senator. Graham's reputation for problem solving through compromise led him into service under several presidents as a United Nations mediator, and he was outspoken as a white southerner regarding civil rights. Brimming with fresh insights, this definitive biography reveals how a personally modest public servant took his place on the national and world stage and, along the way, helped transform North Carolina.

Indian Blues - American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879-1934 (Hardcover): John W. Troutman Indian Blues - American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879-1934 (Hardcover)
John W. Troutman
R746 Discovery Miles 7 460 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

From the late nineteenth century through the 1920s, the U.S. government sought to control practices of music on reservations and in Indian boarding schools. At the same time, Native singers, dancers, and musicians created new opportunities through musical performance to resist and manipulate those same policy initiatives. Why did the practice of music generate fear among government officials and opportunity for Native peoples?

In this innovative study, John W. Troutman explores the politics of music at the turn of the twentieth century in three spheres: reservations, off-reservation boarding schools, and public venues such as concert halls and Chautauqua circuits. On their reservations, the Lakotas manipulated concepts of U.S. citizenship and patriotism to reinvigorate and adapt social dances, even while the federal government stepped up efforts to suppress them. At Carlisle Indian School, teachers and bandmasters taught music in hopes of imposing their "civilization" agenda, but students made their own meaning of their music. Finally, many former students, armed with saxophones, violins, or operatic vocal training, formed their own "all-Indian" and tribal bands and quartets and traversed the country, engaging the market economy and federal Indian policy initiatives on their own terms.

While recent scholarship has offered new insights into the experiences of "show Indians" and evolving powwow traditions, "Indian Blues" is the first book to explore the polyphony of Native musical practices and their relationship to federal Indian policy in this important period of American Indian history.

Colonial Crucible - Empire in the Making of the Modern American State (Paperback): Alfred Mccoy, Francisco Scarano Colonial Crucible - Empire in the Making of the Modern American State (Paperback)
Alfred Mccoy, Francisco Scarano
R973 Discovery Miles 9 730 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

At the end of the nineteenth century the United States swiftly occupied a string of small islands dotting the Caribbean and Western Pacific, from Puerto Rico and Cuba to Hawaii and the Philippines. "Colonial Crucible: Empire in the Making of the Modern American State" reveals how this experiment in direct territorial rule subtly but profoundly shaped U.S. policy and practice--both abroad and, crucially, at home. Edited by Alfred W. McCoy and Francisco A. Scarano, the essays in this volume show how the challenge of ruling such far-flung territories strained the U.S. state to its limits, creating both the need and the opportunity for bold social experiments not yet possible within the United States itself. Plunging Washington's rudimentary bureaucracy into the white heat of nationalist revolution and imperial rivalry, colonialism was a crucible of change in American statecraft. From an expansion of the federal government to the creation of agile public-private networks for more effective global governance, U.S. empire produced far-reaching innovations.
Moving well beyond theory, this volume takes the next step, adding a fine-grained, empirical texture to the study of U.S. imperialism by analyzing its specific consequences. Across a broad range of institutions--policing and prisons, education, race relations, public health, law, the military, and environmental management--this formative experience left a lasting institutional imprint. With each essay distilling years, sometimes decades, of scholarship into a concise argument, "Colonial Crucible" reveals the roots of a legacy evident, most recently, in Washington's misadventures in the Middle East.

Voyages, the Age of Engines v. 2; 1865-Present - Documents in American Maritime History (Paperback): Joshua M. Smith, National... Voyages, the Age of Engines v. 2; 1865-Present - Documents in American Maritime History (Paperback)
Joshua M. Smith, National Maritime Historical Society (U.S.)
R848 Discovery Miles 8 480 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

A two-volume anthology of source readings for maritime history courses "An indispensable resource for anyone interested in teaching American maritime history. This well-organized and edited collection of primary documents will significantly advance students' knowledge of the fundamental role the sea has played in our nation's past."--Christopher P. Magra, California State University at Northridge "The sources in these volumes vividly illustrate the rich maritime tradition that forms the core of American social, economic, political, military, and diplomatic development over two centuries."--Kenneth J. Blume, author of Historical Dictionary of U.S. Diplomacy from the Civil War to World War I "This is the most comprehensive collection of maritime history documents ever published. Drawn from a wide variety of sources, they survey virtually every aspect of American maritime history including maritime exploration, fishing and whaling, labor, diplomacy and warfare, trade and travel, and ecology."--James C. Bradford, Texas A&M University Intended as a text for college and advanced high school students, Voyages covers the entirety of the American maritime experience, from the discovery of the continent to the present. Published in cooperation with the National Maritime Historical Society, the selections chosen for this anthology of primary texts and images place equal emphasis on the ages of sail and steam, on the Atlantic and Pacific, on the Gulf Coasts and the Great Lakes, and on the high seas and inland rivers. The texts have been chosen to provide students with interesting, usable, and historically significant documents that will prompt class discussion and critical thinking. In each case, the material is linked to the larger context of American history, including issues of gender, race, power, labor, and the environment. Joshua Smith is associate professor of humanities at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy.

Voyages, the Age of Sail v. 1; 1492-1865 - Documents in American Maritime History (Paperback): Joshua M. Smith, National... Voyages, the Age of Sail v. 1; 1492-1865 - Documents in American Maritime History (Paperback)
Joshua M. Smith, National Maritime Historical Society (U.S.)
R848 Discovery Miles 8 480 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

A two-volume anthology of source readings for maritime history courses "An indispensable resource for anyone interested in teaching American maritime history. This well-organized and edited collection of primary documents will significantly advance students' knowledge of the fundamental role the sea has played in our nation's past."--Christopher P. Magra, California State University at Northridge "The sources in these volumes vividly illustrate the rich maritime tradition that forms the core of American social, economic, political, military, and diplomatic development over two centuries."--Kenneth J. Blume, author of Historical Dictionary of U.S. Diplomacy from the Civil War to World War I "This is the most comprehensive collection of maritime history documents ever published. Drawn from a wide variety of sources, they survey virtually every aspect of American maritime history including maritime exploration, fishing and whaling, labor, diplomacy and warfare, trade and travel, and ecology."--James C. Bradford, Texas A&M University Intended as a text for college and advanced high school students, Voyages covers the entirety of the American maritime experience, from the discovery of the continent to the present. Published in cooperation with the National Maritime Historical Society, the selections chosen for this anthology of primary texts and images place equal emphasis on the ages of sail and steam, on the Atlantic and Pacific, on the Gulf Coasts and the Great Lakes, and on the high seas and inland rivers. The texts have been chosen to provide students with interesting, usable, and historically significant documents that will prompt class discussion and critical thinking. In each case, the material is linked to the larger context of American history, including issues of gender, race, power, labor, and the environment. Joshua Smith, associate professor of humanities at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, is the author of Borderland Smuggling: Patriots, Loyalists, and Illicit Trade in the Northeast, 1783-1820, winner of the North American Society for Oceanic History's John Lyman Book Award for Best U.S. Maritime History.

The Enlightenment in America, 1720-1825 (Hardcover): Jose R. Torre The Enlightenment in America, 1720-1825 (Hardcover)
Jose R. Torre
R11,767 Discovery Miles 117 670 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

So far, the body of work on the American Enlightenment has focused almost exclusively on two areas - politics and religion. In contrast, scholars have paid little attention to the polyglot efforts of American doctors, scientists, engineers, botanists, poets and other Enlightenment actor. This work fills this significant gap.

A Shot to Save the World - The Inside Story of the Life-or-Death Race for a COVID-19 Vaccine (Hardcover): Gregory Zuckerman A Shot to Save the World - The Inside Story of the Life-or-Death Race for a COVID-19 Vaccine (Hardcover)
Gregory Zuckerman
R526 R368 Discovery Miles 3 680 Save R158 (30%) Ships in 12 - 17 working days
Policing the Seas - Anglo-American Relations and the Equatorial Atlantic, 1819-1865 (Paperback): Mark C. Hunter Policing the Seas - Anglo-American Relations and the Equatorial Atlantic, 1819-1865 (Paperback)
Mark C. Hunter
R663 Discovery Miles 6 630 Ships in 12 - 17 working days
Independent Immigrants - A Settlement of Hanoverian Germans in Western Missouri (Hardcover): Robert W. Frizzell Independent Immigrants - A Settlement of Hanoverian Germans in Western Missouri (Hardcover)
Robert W. Frizzell
R1,128 Discovery Miles 11 280 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Between 1838 and the early 1890s, German peasant farmers from the Kingdom of Hanover made their way to Lafayette County, Missouri, to form a new community centered on the town of Concordia. Their story has much to tell us about the American immigrant experience - and about how newcomers were caught up in the violence that swept through their adoptive home. Robert Frizzell grew up near Concordia, and in this first book-length history of the German settlement, he chronicles its life and times during those formative years. Founded by Hanoverian Friedrich Dierking - known as ""Dierking the Comforter"" for the aid he gave his countrymen - the Concordia settlement blossomed from 72 households in 1850 to 375 over the course of twenty years. Frizzell traces that growth as he examines the success of early agricultural efforts, but he also tells how the community strayed from the cultural path set by its freethinker founder to become a center of religious conservatism. Drawing on archival material from both sides of the Atlantic, Frizzell offers a compelling account for scholars and general readers alike, showing how Concordia differed from other German immigrant communities in America. He also explores the conditions in Hanover - particularly the village of Esperke, from which many of the settlers hailed - that caused people to leave, shedding new light on theological, political, and economic circumstances in both the Old World and the New. When the Civil War came, the antislavery Hanoverians found themselves in the Missouri county with the greatest number of slaves, and the Germans supported the Union while most of their neighbors sympathized with Confederate guerrillas. Frizzell tells how the notorious ""Bloody Bill"" Anderson attacked the community three times, committing atrocities as gruesome as any recorded in the state - then how the community flourished after the war and even bought out the farmsteads of former slaveholders. Frizzell's account challenges many historians' assumptions about German motives for immigration and includes portraits of families and individuals that show the high price in toil and blood required to meet the challenges of making a home in a new land. Independent Immigrants reveals the untold story of these newcomers as it reveals a little-known aspect of the Civil War in Missouri.

Adult Suffrage and Political Administration in Jamaica, 1944-2002 - A Compendium and Commentary (Paperback): Trevor Munroe Adult Suffrage and Political Administration in Jamaica, 1944-2002 - A Compendium and Commentary (Paperback)
Trevor Munroe
R628 Discovery Miles 6 280 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Since 1944, the Jamaican people, without ethnic or religious strife, civil war, military coup, one-party dictatorship, assassination of political leaders, insurgency or genocide, have voted out governments and voted in opposition parties in free and fair elections - a record in democratic governance equalled by only a handful of stated worldwide. In Adult Suffrage and Political Administrations in Jamaica, 1944-2002, Trevor Munroe and Arnold Bertram, both active participants in this process, documents critical aspects of this record. Key features of this publication include: the elections through which the consolidation of democracy occurred, the representatives - their gender, education, occupation, age - whom the people chose to form 13 successive governments and parliaments; the laws that the legislature passed and the institutions governments established in building a modern democratic state; advances and failures - political, economic, social and cultural - of each administration; comparison of the performances of successive administrations the critical challenges facing the Jamaican people and the new leaders.

Defending the Masses - A Progressive Lawyer's Battles for Free Speech (Paperback): Eric B. Easton Defending the Masses - A Progressive Lawyer's Battles for Free Speech (Paperback)
Eric B. Easton
R657 R555 Discovery Miles 5 550 Save R102 (16%) Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Free speech and freedom of the press were often suppressed amid the social turbulence of the Progressive Era and World War I. As muckrakers, feminists, pacifists, anarchists, socialists, and communists were arrested or censored for their outspoken views, many of them turned to a Manhattan lawyer named Gilbert Roe to keep them in business and out of jail. Roe was the principal trial lawyer of the Free Speech League-a precursor of the American Civil Liberties Union. His cases involved such activists as Emma Goldman, Lincoln Steffens, Margaret Sanger, Max Eastman, Upton Sinclair, John Reed, and Eugene Debs, as well as the socialist magazine The Masses and the New York City Teachers Union. A friend of Wisconsin's progressive senator Robert La Follette since their law partnership as young men, Roe defended "Fighting Bob" when the Senate tried to expel him for opposing America's entry into World War I. In articulating and upholding Americans' fundamental right to free expression against charges of obscenity, libel, espionage, sedition, or conspiracy during turbulent times, Roe was rarely successful in the courts. But his battles illuminate the evolution of free speech doctrine and practice in an era when it was under heavy assault. His greatest victory, including the 1917 decision by Judge Learned Hand in The Masses Publishing Co. v. Patten, is still influential today.

The Nra - The Unauthorized History (Paperback): Frank Smyth The Nra - The Unauthorized History (Paperback)
Frank Smyth
R413 R348 Discovery Miles 3 480 Save R65 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Evolution of a Missouri Asylum - Fulton State Hospital, 1851-2006 (Hardcover): Richard L. Lael, Barbara Brazos, Margot Ford... Evolution of a Missouri Asylum - Fulton State Hospital, 1851-2006 (Hardcover)
Richard L. Lael, Barbara Brazos, Margot Ford McMillen
R1,253 Discovery Miles 12 530 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

Fulton State Hospital was not only Missouri's first state mental asylum but also the first such institution west of the Mississippi. In tracing its founding and evolution over a century and a half, this book sheds light on both a neglected aspect of the state's history and the development of mental health care in America. It acknowledges the noble aspirations of Fulton State Hospital - as well as its failures, throughout much of its existence, to transform those aspirations into realities. This institutional history of the hospital traces the debates surrounding its creation (as the State Lunatic Asylum) in a time when mental illness was barely understood. Although the Fulton hospital was initially conceived as a treatment facility, it quickly transformed into a primarily custodial institution. It existed as a self-sufficient establishment until the mid-twentieth century, dependent on patient labor and even producing its own food. But for the most socially disadvantaged and for the severely delusional, life at Fulton was anything but therapeutic. The book describes not only the lofty goals of professionals dedicated to treating the mentally ill but also an institution clouded by overcrowding, financial mismanagement, political cronyism, and wrongful confinement. It considers segregation within the hospital, where the first black doctor was hired in 1960 and where racism nevertheless continued to flourish, and it describes how, even after the 1921 Eleemosynary Act, the patronage system continued to plague Fulton for two more decades. The authors reveal changing attitudes toward new treatments in the mid-twentieth century as psychotherapy and drugs became common, and decisions at Fulton regarding patient care are described within the context of progress in Europe and the eastern United States. The book addresses the complexities facing the physician-superintendents who supervised both medical therapies and administrative matters, depicting ongoing tension between hospital finances and state support and showing the difficulties state institutions faced in a ""low tax/low public service"" environment. As Fulton State Hospital enters the twenty-first century, clients have become active in the development of institutional policies - a far cry from the warehousing of patients a hundred years ago. In tracing these seismic shifts in mental health care, this book offers an eye-opening exploration of how one state has sought to care for its citizens.

Unveiled Voices, Unvarnished Memories - The Cromwell Family in Slavery and Segregation, 1692-1972 (Hardcover): Adelaide M... Unveiled Voices, Unvarnished Memories - The Cromwell Family in Slavery and Segregation, 1692-1972 (Hardcover)
Adelaide M Cromwell
R1,144 Discovery Miles 11 440 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

When an industrious slave named Willis Hodges Cromwell earned the money to obtain liberty for his wife - who then bought freedom for him and for their children - he set in motion a family saga that resounds today. His youngest son, John Wesley Cromwell, became an educator, lawyer, and newspaper publisher - and one of the most influential men of letters in the generation that bridged Frederick Douglass and W. E. B. Du Bois. Now, in ""Unveiled Voices, Unvarnished Memories"", his granddaughter, Adelaide M. Cromwell, documents the journey of her family from the slave marts of Annapolis to achievements in a variety of learned professions. John W. Cromwell began the family archives from which this book is drawn - letters and documents that provide an unprecedented view of how one black family thought, strived, and survived in American society from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. These papers reflect intimate thoughts about such topics as national and local leaders, moral behavior, color consciousness, and the challenges of everyday life in a racist society. They also convey a wealth of rich insights on the burdens that black parents' demands for achievement placed on their children, the frequently bitter rivalries within the intellectual class of the African American community, and the negative impact on African American women of sexism in a world dominated by black men whose own hold on respect was tentative at best. The voices gathered here give readers an inside look at the formation and networks of the African American elite, as John Cromwell forged friendships with such figures as journalist John E. Bruce and the Reverend Theophilus Gould Steward. Letters with those two faithfully depict the forces that shaped the worldview of the small but steadily expanding community of African American intellectuals who helped transform the nation's attitudes and policies on race, and whose unguarded comments on a wide range of matters will be of particular interest to social historians. Additional correspondence between John and his son, John Jr., brings the family story into modern times. ""Unveiled Voices, Unvarnished Memories"" is a rare look at the public and private world of individuals who refused to be circumscribed by racism and the ghetto while pursuing their own well-being. Its narrative depth breaks new ground in African American history and offers a unique primary source for that community.

Barack Obama - Conservative, Pragmatist, Progressive (Hardcover): Burton I. Kaufman Barack Obama - Conservative, Pragmatist, Progressive (Hardcover)
Burton I. Kaufman
R601 R494 Discovery Miles 4 940 Save R107 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In this insightful biography, Burton I. Kaufman explores how the political career of Barack Obama was marked by conservative tendencies that frustrated his progressive supporters and gave the lie to socialist fearmongering on the right. Obama's was a landmark presidency that paradoxically, Kaufman shows, resulted in few, if any, radical shifts in policy. Following his election, President Obama's supporters and detractors anticipated radical reform. As the first African American to serve as president, he reached the White House on a campaign promise of change. But Kaufman finds in Obama clear patterns of classical conservativism of an ideological sort and basic policy-making pragmatism. His commitment to usher in a multiracial, multiethnic, and multicultural society was fundamentally connected to opening up, but not radically altering, the existing free enterprise system. The Affordable Care Act, arguably President Obama's greatest policy achievement, was a distillation of his complex motivations for policy. More conservative than radical, the ACA fitted the expansion of health insurance into the existing system. Similarly, in foreign policy, Obama eschewed the use of force to affect regime change. Yet he kept boots on the ground in the Middle East and supported ballot-box revolts geared toward achieving in foreign countries the same principles of liberalism, free enterprise, and competition that existed in the United States. In estimating the course and impact of Obama's full political life, Kaufman makes clear that both the desire for and fear of change in the American polity affected the popular perception but not the course of action of the forty-fourth US president.

South Carolina and the American Revolution - A Battlefield History (Paperback): John W. Gordon South Carolina and the American Revolution - A Battlefield History (Paperback)
John W. Gordon; Foreword by John Keegan
R544 Discovery Miles 5 440 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

An estimated one-third of all combat actions in the American Revolution took place in South Carolina. From the partisan clashes of the backcountry's war for the hearts and minds of settlers to bloody encounters with Native Americans on the frontier, more battles were fought in South Carolina than any other of the original thirteen states. The state also had more than its share of pitched battles between Continental troops and British regulars. In South Carolina and the American Revolution: A Battlefield History, John W. Gordon illustrates how these encounters, fought between 1775 and 1783, were critical to winning the struggle that secured America's independence from Great Britain. According to Gordon, when the war reached stalemate in other zones and the South became its final theater, South Carolina was the decisive battleground. Recounting the clashes in the state, Gordon identifies three sources of attack: the powerful British fleet and seaborne forces of the British regulars; the Cherokees in the west; and, internally, a loyalist population numerous enough to support British efforts towards reconquest. From the successful defense of Fort Sullivan (the palmetto-log fort at the mouth of Charleston harbor), capture and occupation of Charleston in 1780, to later battles at King's Mountain and Cowpens, this chronicle reveals how troops in South Carolina frustrated a campaign for restoration of royal authority and set British troops on the road to ultimate defeat at Yorktown. Despite their successes in 1780 and 1781, the British found themselves with a difficult military problem--having to wage a conventional war against American regular forces while also mounting a counterinsurgencyagainst the partisan bands of Francis Marion, Andrew Pickens, and Thomas Sumter. In this comprehensive assessment of one southern state's battlegrounds, Gordon examines how military policy in its strategic, operational, and tactical dimensions set the state for American success in the Revolution.

The Creole Rebellion - The Most Successful Slave Revolt in American History (Hardcover): Bruce Chadwick The Creole Rebellion - The Most Successful Slave Revolt in American History (Hardcover)
Bruce Chadwick
R598 R502 Discovery Miles 5 020 Save R96 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The Creole Rebellion tells the suspenseful story of a successful mutiny on board the slave ship Creole. En route for a New Orleans slave-auction block in November 1841, nineteen captives mutinied, killing one man and injuring several others. After taking control of the vessel, mutineer Madison Washington forced the crewmen to sail to the Bahamas. Despite much local hysteria upon their arrival, all of the 135 slaves aboard the ship won their freedom there. The revolt significantly fueled and amplified the slave debate within a divided nation that was already hurtling toward a Civil War. While this is a book about the United States confronting the ugly and tumultuous issue of slavery, it is also about the 135 enslaved men and women who were unwilling to take their oppression any longer and rose up to free themselves in a bloody fight. Part history, part adventure, and part legal drama, Bruce Chadwick chronicles the most successful slave revolt in the pages of American history.

Scandal at Bizarre - Rumor and Reputation in Jefferson's America (Paperback, Annotated edition): Cynthia A. Kierner Scandal at Bizarre - Rumor and Reputation in Jefferson's America (Paperback, Annotated edition)
Cynthia A. Kierner
R980 R793 Discovery Miles 7 930 Save R187 (19%) Ships in 12 - 17 working days

In the early 1790s Richard Randolph was accused of fathering a child by his sister-in-law, Nancy, and murdering the baby shortly after its birth. Rumors about the incident, which occurred during a visit to the plantation of close family friends, spread like wildfire. Randolph found himself on trial for the crime largely because of the public outrage fueled by these rumors. The rest of the household suffered too, and only Nancy, who later married the esteemed New York statesman Gouverneur Morris, would find any degree of happiness. A tale of family passion, betrayal, and deception, Scandal at Bizarre is a fascinating historical portrait of the social and political realities of a world long vanished.

Otto Wood, the Bandit - The Freighthopping Thief, Bootlegger, and Convicted Murderer behind the Appalachian Ballads... Otto Wood, the Bandit - The Freighthopping Thief, Bootlegger, and Convicted Murderer behind the Appalachian Ballads (Paperback)
Trevor Mckenzie; Foreword by David Holt
R397 R336 Discovery Miles 3 360 Save R61 (15%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Legions of bluegrass fans know the name Otto Wood (1894-1930) from a ballad made popular by Doc Watson, telling the story of Wood's crimes and his eventual end at the hands of the local sheriff. However, few know the history of this Appalachian figure beyond the larger-than-life version heard in song. Trevor McKenzie reconstructs Wood's life, tracing how a Wilkes County juvenile delinquent became a celebrated folk hero. Throughout his short life, he was jailed for numerous offenses, stole countless automobiles, lost his left hand, and escaped state prison at least four times after a 1923 murder conviction. An early master of controlling his own narrative in the media, Wood appealed to the North Carolina public as a misunderstood, clever antihero. In 1930, after a final jailbreak, police killed Wood in a shootout. The ballad bearing his name first appeared less than a year later. Using reports of Wood's exploits from contemporary newspapers, his self-published autobiography, prison records, and other primary sources, McKenzie uses this colorful story to offer a new way to understand North Carolina and the South during this era of American history.

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