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Books > Humanities > History > American history > General

Bakers and Basques - A Social History of Bread in Mexico (Paperback): Robert Weis Bakers and Basques - A Social History of Bread in Mexico (Paperback)
Robert Weis
R779 Discovery Miles 7 790 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Mexico City's colorful panaderías (bakeries) have long been vital neighborhood institutions. They were also crucial sites where labor, subsistence, and politics collided. From the 1880s well into the twentieth century, Basque immigrants dominated the bread trade, to the detriment of small Mexican bakers. By taking us inside the panadería, into the heart of bread strikes, and through government halls, Robert Weis reveals why authorities and organized workers supported the so-called Spanish monopoly in ways that countered the promises of law and ideology. He tells the gritty story of how class struggle and the politics of food shaped the state and the market. More than a book about bread, Bakers and Basques places food and labor at the center of the upheavals in Mexican history from independence to the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution.

Canoe Indians of Down East Maine (Paperback): William A. Haviland Canoe Indians of Down East Maine (Paperback)
William A. Haviland
R415 R339 Discovery Miles 3 390 Save R76 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In 1604, when Frenchmen landed on Saint Croix Island, they were far from the first people to walk along its shores. For thousands of years, Etchemins--whose descendants were members of the Wabanaki Confederacy-- had lived, loved and labored in Down East Maine. Bound together with neighboring people, all of whom relied heavily on canoes for transportation, trade and survival, each group still maintained its own unique cultures and customs. After the French arrived, they faced unspeakable hardships, from "the Great Dying," when disease killed up to 90 percent of coastal populations, to centuries of discrimination. They never abandoned Ketakamigwa, their homeland. In this book, anthropologist William Haviland relates the history of hardship and survival endured by the natives of the Down East coast and how they have maintained their way of life over the past four hundred years.

Colors of Confinement - Rare Kodachrome Photographs of Japanese American Incarceration in World War II (Hardcover, New... Colors of Confinement - Rare Kodachrome Photographs of Japanese American Incarceration in World War II (Hardcover, New edition)
Eric L. Muller
R830 R674 Discovery Miles 6 740 Save R156 (19%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In 1942, Bill Manbo and his family were forced from their Hollywood home into the Japanese American internment camp at Heart Mountain in Wyoming. While there, Manbo documented both the bleakness and beauty of his surroundings, using Kodachrome film, a technology then just seven years old, to capture community celebrations and to record his family's struggle to maintain a normal life under the harsh conditions of racial imprisonment. Colors of Confinement showcases sixty-five stunning images from this extremely rare collection of color photographs, presented along with three interpretive essays by leading scholars and a reflective, personal essay by a former Heart Mountain internee. The subjects of these haunting photos are the routine fare of an amateur photographer: parades, cultural events, people at play, Manbo's son. But the images are set against the backdrop of the barbed-wire enclosure surrounding the Heart Mountain Relocation Center and the dramatic expanse of Wyoming sky and landscape. The accompanying essays illuminate these scenes as they trace a tumultuous history unfolding just beyond the camera's lens, giving readers insight into Japanese American cultural life and the stark realities of life in the camps.

Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico (Paperback, New): Victor M. Macias-Gonzalez, Anne Rubenstein Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico (Paperback, New)
Victor M. Macias-Gonzalez, Anne Rubenstein
R909 Discovery Miles 9 090 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico, historians and anthropologists explain how evolving notions of the meaning and practice of manhood have shaped Mexican history. In essays that range from Texas to Oaxaca and from the 1880s to the present, contributors write about file clerks and movie stars, wealthy world travelers and ordinary people whose adventures were confined to a bar in the middle of town. The Mexicans we meet in these essays lived out their identities through extraordinary events--committing terrible crimes, writing world-famous songs, and ruling the nation--but also in everyday activities like falling in love, raising families, getting dressed, and going to the movies. Thus, these essays in the history of masculinity connect the major topics of Mexican political history since 1880 to the history of daily life.

Vermont Women, Native Americans & African Americans - Out of the Shadows of History (Paperback): Cynthia D Bittinger Vermont Women, Native Americans & African Americans - Out of the Shadows of History (Paperback)
Cynthia D Bittinger
R426 R352 Discovery Miles 3 520 Save R74 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Join local scholar Cyndy Bittinger on a journey through the forgotten tales of the roles that Native Americans, African Americans and women-often overlooked-played in Vermont's master narrative and history. Bittinger not only shows where these marginalized groups are missing from history, but also emphasizes the ways that they contributed and their unique experiences.

Biographies of the Revolution Set: Marilyn Boyer, Rick Boyer Biographies of the Revolution Set
Marilyn Boyer, Rick Boyer
R1,150 R895 Discovery Miles 8 950 Save R255 (22%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days
Ghosts of Colorado Springs and Pikes Peak (Paperback): Stephanie Waters Ghosts of Colorado Springs and Pikes Peak (Paperback)
Stephanie Waters
R419 R344 Discovery Miles 3 440 Save R75 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Eerie tales have been part of the city's history from the beginning: Pikes Peak and Cheyenne Mountain are the subjects of several spooky Native American legends, and Anasazi spirits are still seen at the ancient cliff dwellings outside town. In the Old North End neighborhood, the howls of hellhounds ring through the night, and visitors at the Cheyenne Canon Inn have spotted the spirit of Alex Riddle on the grounds for over a century. Henry Harkin has haunted Dead Mans' Canyon since his gruesome murder in 1863, and Poor Bessie Bouton is said to linger on Cutler Mountain, hovering where her body was discovered more than a century ago. Ghost hunter and tour guide Stephanie Waters explores the stories behind "Little London's" oldest and scariest tales.

New York's Original Penn Station - The Rise and Tragic Fall of an American Landmark (Paperback): Paulm Kaplan New York's Original Penn Station - The Rise and Tragic Fall of an American Landmark (Paperback)
Paulm Kaplan
R481 R399 Discovery Miles 3 990 Save R82 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Wicked Carlisle - The Dark Side of the Cumberland Valley (Paperback): Joseph David Cress Wicked Carlisle - The Dark Side of the Cumberland Valley (Paperback)
Joseph David Cress
R419 R344 Discovery Miles 3 440 Save R75 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

With Wicked Carlisle, author Joe Cress revisits the criminal history of Cumberland County. Taking a more focused and less bloody approach, Cress will largely bring new stories of mischief to the table, though he will revisit the lighter side of two or three crimes from Murder and Mayhem in Cumberland County. From stories of college pranks gone wrong, Carlisle's own Robin Hood and the robbing and subsequent torching of a beloved local theater (the Strand where the local HS now sits ) to abuses at the Carlisle Indian School and the town's connection to the raid on Harper's Ferry, Cress scours the underbelly of the borough for mischief and misdeeds.

University Builder - Edgar Odell Lovett and the Founding of the Rice Institute (Paperback, 2nd Updated ed.): John B. Boles University Builder - Edgar Odell Lovett and the Founding of the Rice Institute (Paperback, 2nd Updated ed.)
John B. Boles
R505 Discovery Miles 5 050 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Rice University, one of America's preeminent institutions of higher education, grew out of the vision, direction, and leadership of one man: Edgar Odell Lovett (1871--1957). University Builder is the fascinating story of this extraordinary educator and the unique school he created. Widely acknowledged, almost from its founding in 1912, as one of America's best universities, Rice is distinguished as both the smallest and the youngest institution in the top tier of American universities. In telling the tale of Lovett and his innovative, enduring vision for Rice, John Boles provides both a compelling biographical narrative and a refreshing new view of American higher education in the first half of the twentieth century.

Lovett was not a Texan; he was not even a southerner. Rather, with two Ph.D.'s in hand, he was a rising star at Princeton University when the trustees of the newly founded Rice Institute--chartered in 1891 by wealthy Houston merchant William Marsh Rice--called him in 1907 to be the school's first president. Working with a significant endowment, a vague charter, a supportive board, and a visionary's gift for planning, Lovett set out on a fact-finding tour of educational institutions around the globe. He transformed the idea of the Institute into a complete university, one that emphasized research as much as teaching and aspired to world-class status. He sought the best architect available to design the campus, lured distinguished faculty from leading universities across the globe to Texas, and constructed a far-reaching vision of a small, carefully planned, elite university that incorporated the most advanced educational practices and shaped Rice's development for the next century.

Lovett served as president of Rice for nearly forty years, proving himself to be an exemplary and charismatic leader who inspired two generations of students. He was the creator of Rice University in practically every way. Indeed, perhaps no other American university has been so shaped by its founder's vision. Boles's exceptional account of Lovett's remarkable academic achievement is a vital contribution to the legacy of Rice University and an important addition to the historiography of education in the early twentieth-century South.

Modernizing Minds in El Salvador - Education Reform and the Cold War, 1960-1980 (Paperback): Hector Lindo-Fuentes, Erik Ching Modernizing Minds in El Salvador - Education Reform and the Cold War, 1960-1980 (Paperback)
Hector Lindo-Fuentes, Erik Ching
R810 Discovery Miles 8 100 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In the 1960s and 1970s, El Salvador's reigning military regime instituted a series of reforms that sought to modernize the country and undermine ideological radicalism, the most ambitious of which was an education initiative. It was multifaceted, but its most controversial component was the use of televisions in classrooms. Launched in 1968 and lasting until the eve of civil war in the late 1970s, the reform resulted in students receiving instruction through programs broadcast from the capital city of San Salvador. The Salvadoran teachers' union opposed the content and the method of the reform and launched two massive strikes. The military regime answered with repressive violence, further alienating educators and pushing many of them into guerrilla fronts. In this thoughtful collaborative study, the authors examine the processes by which education reform became entwined in debates over theories of modernization and the politics of anticommunism. Further analysis examines how the movement pushed the country into the type of brutal infighting that was taking place throughout the third world as the U.S. and U.S.S.R. struggled to impose their political philosophies on developing countries.

Hisat'sinom - Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water (Paperback): Christian E. Downum Hisat'sinom - Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water (Paperback)
Christian E. Downum
R664 R540 Discovery Miles 5 400 Save R124 (19%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The national monuments of Wupatki, Walnut Canyon, and Montezuma's Castle showcase the treasures of the first people who settled and developed farms, towns, and trade routes throughout northern Arizona and beyond. The Hopis call these ancient peoples "Hisat'sinom," and Spanish explorers named their hard, arid homeland the sierra sin agua, mountains without water. Indeed, much of the region receives less annual precipitation than the quintessential desert city of Tucson. In Hisat'sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water, archaeologists explain how the people of this region flourished despite living in a place with very little water and extremes of heat and cold. Exploiting the mulching properties of volcanic cinders blasted out of Sunset Crater, the Hisat'sinom grew corn and cotton, made and traded fine cotton cloth and decorated ceramics, and imported exotic goods like turquoise and macaws from hundreds-even thousands-of miles away. From clues as small as the tiny fingerprints left on children's toys, post holes in the floors of old houses, and widely scattered corn fields, archaeologists have pieced together an intriguing portrait of what childhood was like, the importance of weaving cotton cloth, and how farmers managed risk in a harsh environment. At its peak in the late 1100s, Wupatki stood as the region's largest and tallest town, a cultural center for people throughout the surrounding region. It was a gathering place, a trading center, a treasury of exotic goods, a landmark, and a place of sacred ritual and ceremony. Then, after 1200, people moved away and the pueblo sank into ruin.

A Harvest of Reluctant Souls - Fray Alonso de Benavides's History of New Mexico, 1630 (Paperback): Baker H. Morrow A Harvest of Reluctant Souls - Fray Alonso de Benavides's History of New Mexico, 1630 (Paperback)
Baker H. Morrow
R529 Discovery Miles 5 290 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The most thorough account ever written of southwestern life in the early seventeenth century, this engaging book was first published in 1630 as an official report to the king of Spain by Fray Alonso de Benavides, a Portuguese Franciscan who was the third head of the mission churches of New Mexico. In 1625, Father Benavides and his party traveled north from Mexico City to New Mexico, a strange land of frozen rivers, Indian citadels, and mines full of silver and garnets. Benavides and his Franciscan brothers built schools, erected churches, engineered peace treaties, and were said to perform miracles. Benavides's riveting exploration narrative provides portraits of the Pueblo Indians, the Apaches, and the Navajos at a time of fundamental change. It also gives us the first full picture of European colonial life in the southern Rockies, the southwestern deserts, and the Great Plains, along with an account of mission architecture and mission life and a unique evocation of faith in the wilderness.

The Papers of George Washington - 28 August-27 October 1780 (Hardcover): George Washington The Papers of George Washington - 28 August-27 October 1780 (Hardcover)
George Washington
R2,812 Discovery Miles 28 120 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In late August 1780, Gen. George Washington was buoyed by expectations that French reinforcements would participate in an attack on New York City and that a southern army was poised to advance through South Carolina and possibly regain Charleston. News soon reached him that a key division was delayed in France and that units under Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates had been scattered near Camden, S.C. In response to these crises, Washington dismissed northern militia to conserve supplies, directed additional forces to the southern department, and selected Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene to replace Gates. In a dramatic turn of events, Washington learned of the defection of Maj. Gen. Benedict Arnold - who had plotted with British adjutant general John Andre to betray West Point - and, acting decisively, concentrated his troops and rebuffed British appeals to spare the captured Andre (who was hanged as a spy), ensuring the rescue of the Post & Garrison of West point from Arnolds villainous perfidy.

Wild Bill - The True Story of the American Frontier's First Gunfighter (Paperback): Tom Clavin Wild Bill - The True Story of the American Frontier's First Gunfighter (Paperback)
Tom Clavin
R248 R215 Discovery Miles 2 150 Save R33 (13%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Military Conquest of the Prairie - Native American Resistance, Evasion & Survival,  1865-1890 (Paperback): Tore T. Petersen Military Conquest of the Prairie - Native American Resistance, Evasion & Survival, 1865-1890 (Paperback)
Tore T. Petersen
R702 R601 Discovery Miles 6 010 Save R101 (14%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The Military Conquest of the Prairie is a study on the final wars on the prairie from the Native American perspective. When the reservation system took hold about one-third of tribes stayed permanently there, one-third during the harsh winter months, and the last third remained on what the government termed unceded territory, which Native Americans had the right to occupy by treaty. For the Federal government it was completely unacceptable that some Indians refused to submit to its authority. Both the Red River war (1874-75) in the south and the great Sioux war (1876-77 ) in the north were the direct result of Federal violation of treaties and agreements. At issue was the one-sided violence against free roaming tribes that were trying to maintain their old way of life, at the heart of which was avoidance on intermingling with white men. Contrary to the expectations of the government, and indeed to most historical accounts, the Native Americans were winning on the battlefields with clear conceptions of strategy and tactics. They only laid down their arms when their reservation was secured on their homeland, thus providing their preferred living space and enabling them to continue their way of life in security. But white man perfidy and governmental double-cross were the order of the day. The Federal government found it intolerable that what it termed savages' should be able to determine their own future. Vicious attacks were initiated in order to stamp out tribalism, resulting in driving the US aboriginal population almost to extinction. Analysis of these events is discussed in light of the passing of the Dawes Act in 1887 that provided for breaking up the reservations to the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 that gave a semblance of justice to Native Americans.

Medical Apartheid - The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present... Medical Apartheid - The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present (Paperback)
Harriet A Washington
R414 R350 Discovery Miles 3 500 Save R64 (15%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

"Medical Apartheid" is the first and only comprehensive history of medical experimentation on African Americans, from the era of slavery to today. Washington details the ways both slaves and freedmen have been used in hospitals for experiments conducted without their knowledge.

Daily Life of the Aztecs (Paperback, Harper Trophy ed.): Jacques Soustelle Daily Life of the Aztecs (Paperback, Harper Trophy ed.)
Jacques Soustelle
R635 R511 Discovery Miles 5 110 Save R124 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Tireless speech-makers and lovers of verse, the ancient Aztecs used a pictographic system to keep records of their history, geography, and rituals. Many of these accounts were destroyed after the Spanish conquest; but fortunately, a few survived, including records kept by the invaders. This book by an international authority on Mexican archeology and sociology presents a vivid account of that profoundly religious Aztec warrior society--from its days as a primitive people, to the early sixteenth century when a powerful government ruled with great organizational ability and restless energy. A highly readable text, accompanied by rare illustrations, describes public buildings and market places, the problems of life in a great city-state, the ruling classes and living standards, religious beliefs, the everyday lives of people--from birth to death, and much more. Amazing in scope and detail, this volume will be invaluable to students of Mexican history and of interest to anyone fascinated by this ancient civilization. Unabridged republication of the edition published by the MacMillan Company, New York, 1962. 39 black-and-white illustrations.

Never Caught - The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge (Paperback): Erica Armstrong Dunbar Never Caught - The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge (Paperback)
Erica Armstrong Dunbar
R367 R304 Discovery Miles 3 040 Save R63 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

A startling and eye-opening look into America's First Family, Never Caught is the powerful story about a daring woman of "extraordinary grit" (The Philadelphia Inquirer). When George Washington was elected president, he reluctantly left behind his beloved Mount Vernon to serve in Philadelphia, the temporary seat of the nation's capital. In setting up his household he brought along nine slaves, including Ona Judge. As the President grew accustomed to Northern ways, there was one change he couldn't abide: Pennsylvania law required enslaved people be set free after six months of residency in the state. Rather than comply, Washington decided to circumvent the law. Every six months he sent the slaves back down south just as the clock was about to expire. Though Ona Judge lived a life of relative comfort, she was denied freedom. So, when the opportunity presented itself one clear and pleasant spring day in Philadelphia, Judge left everything she knew to escape to New England. Yet freedom would not come without its costs. At just twenty-two-years-old, Ona became the subject of an intense manhunt led by George Washington, who used his political and personal contacts to recapture his property. "A crisp and compulsively readable feat of research and storytelling" (USA TODAY), historian and National Book Award finalist Erica Armstrong Dunbar weaves a powerful tale and offers fascinating new scholarship on how one young woman risked everything to gain freedom from the famous founding father.

The North American Journals of Prince Maximilian of Wied - September 1833-August 1834 (Hardcover, 3rd): Prince Alexander... The North American Journals of Prince Maximilian of Wied - September 1833-August 1834 (Hardcover, 3rd)
Prince Alexander Philipp Maximilian of Wied; Edited by Stephen S. Witte, Marsha V. Gallagher; Translated by Dieter Karch; Foreword by Jack F Becker
R2,415 Discovery Miles 24 150 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Few historical chronicles are as informative and eloquent as the journals written by Prince Maximilian of Wied as a record of his journey into the North American interior in 1833-34, following the route Lewis and Clark had taken almost thirty years earlier. Maximilian's memorable descriptions of topography, Native peoples, natural history, and the burgeoning fur trade were further brought to life through the now-familiar watercolors and prints of Karl Bodmer, the young Swiss artist who accompanied him.

The first two volumes of the "North American Journals" recount the prince's journey from Europe to St. Louis, then up the Missouri some 2,500 river miles to the expedition's western endpoint, Fort McKenzie, in what is today Montana. In this third, and final, volume, Maximilian vividly narrates his extended stay at Fort Clark (near today's Bismarck, North Dakota) and his return journey eastward across America and on to his home in Germany. Despite subzero temperatures and a shortage of food at Fort Clark during the winter of 1833-34, Maximilian continued to study and interview the Mandan and Hidatsa Indians who lived nearby, recording descriptions of their social customs, religious rituals, languages, material culture, and art. This handsome, oversize volume not only reproduces the prince's historic document but also features every one of his illustrations--nearly 100 in all, including several in color--from the original journal, along with other watercolors, now housed at Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska.

Publication of these journals, fifty years in the making and complete with extensive annotation, opens the 1830s American West to modern readers in an indispensable scholarly resource and a work of lasting beauty."This book is published with the assistance of the National Historical Publications and Records Commission."

Kemah (Paperback): Pepper Coffey, The Kemah Historical Society Kemah (Paperback)
Pepper Coffey, The Kemah Historical Society
R468 R386 Discovery Miles 3 860 Save R82 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Kemah is the Karankawa Indian word for "wind in the face." In the early 1900s, it was a breezy coastal village where many residents made a living in the fishing or boating industries. From the 1920s to the 1950s, Kemah relied on illegal gambling and bootlegging to survive. After the devastation of Hurricane Carla in 1961, local restaurants rebuilt and became favorites of Houstonians, who enjoyed the seafood and relaxing atmosphere. Because subsidence caused much of Kemah to flood during high tide, a marina was built in 1988 to ease the problem in low-lying areas. Today, the Kemah area has the third largest fleet of recreational boats in America. When older homes were converted into quaint shops, the Kemah Lighthouse Shopping District was formed. In 1997, property on the Clear Creek channel and Kemah bay front was acquired in order to develop the Kemah Boardwalk, one of the top 10 boardwalks in America.

Keystone Nations - Indigenous Peoples and Salmon across the North Pacific (Paperback): Benedict J. Colombi, James F. Brooks Keystone Nations - Indigenous Peoples and Salmon across the North Pacific (Paperback)
Benedict J. Colombi, James F. Brooks
R908 Discovery Miles 9 080 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The histories and futures of Indigenous peoples and salmon are inextricably bound across the vast ocean expanse and rugged coastlines of the North Pacific. Keystone Nations addresses this enmeshment and the marriage of the biological and social sciences that have led to the research discussed in this book. Salmon stocks and Indigenous peoples across the northern Pacific region represent a significance beyond their size in maintaining the viability and legitimacy of ecological and political systems. Both species' futures are simultaneously a matter of the conservation concerns of natural scientists and the political agenda of Indigenous sovereignty movements that arc across the northern hemisphere. If wild salmon vanish in the North Pacific, as they largely have in the North Atlantic, their absence will herald the cascading failure of a complete marine system. If Indigenous peoples vanish from the North Pacific, as they largely have in the North Atlantic, their absence will sound the failure of the world's dominant political powers to recognise the human right to cultural expression and survival.

Atlanta's Ponce de Leon Avenue - A History (Paperback): Sharon Foster Jones Atlanta's Ponce de Leon Avenue - A History (Paperback)
Sharon Foster Jones
R415 R339 Discovery Miles 3 390 Save R76 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Named for the famous Spanish explorer who was said to have discovered the Fountain of Youth, Atlanta's Ponce de Leon Avenue began as a simple country road that conveyed visitors to the healing springs that once bubbled along it. Now, as one of Atlanta's major commuter thoroughfares, few motorists realize that the Avenue was a prestigious residential street in Victorian Atlanta, home to mayors and millionaires. An economic turn in the twentieth century transformed the Avenue into a crime-ridden commercial corridor, but in recent years, Atlantans have rediscovered the street's venerable architecture and storied history. Join local historian Sharon Foster Jones on a vivid tour of the Avenue-- from picnics by the springs in hoopskirts, to the Fox Theatre and Atlanta Crackers baseball, and the days when Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable lodged in the esteemed hotels lining this magnificent Avenue.

Destitute Patriots - Bertie County in the War of 1812 (Paperback): Gerald W. Thomas Destitute Patriots - Bertie County in the War of 1812 (Paperback)
Gerald W. Thomas
R363 R311 Discovery Miles 3 110 Save R52 (14%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Indian Blues - American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879-1934 (Paperback): John W. Troutman Indian Blues - American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879-1934 (Paperback)
John W. Troutman
R689 Discovery Miles 6 890 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

From the late nineteenth century through the 1920s, the U.S. government sought to control practices of music on reservations and in Indian boarding schools. At the same time, Native singers, dancers, and musicians created new opportunities through musical performance to resist and manipulate those same policy initiatives. Why did the practice of music generate fear among government officials and opportunity for Native peoples? In this innovative study, John W. Troutman explores the politics of music at the turn of the twentieth century in three spheres: reservations, off-reservation boarding schools, and public venues such as concert halls and Chautauqua circuits. On their reservations, the Lakotas manipulated concepts of U.S. citizenship and patriotism to reinvigorate and adapt social dances, even while the federal government stepped up efforts to suppress them. At Carlisle Indian School, teachers and bandmasters taught music in hopes of imposing their ""civilization"" agenda, but students made their own meaning of their music. Finally, many former students, armed with saxophones, violins, or operatic vocal training, formed their own ""all-Indian"" and tribal bands and quartets and traversed the country, engaging the market economy and federal Indian policy initiatives on their own terms. While recent scholarship has offered new insights into the experiences of ""show Indians"" and evolving powwow traditions, Indian Blues is the first book to explore the polyphony of Native musical practices and their relationship to federal Indian policy in this important period of American Indian history.

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