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Books > History > World history > 1750 to 1900

Oxford AQA History for A Level: Tsarist and Communist Russia 1855-1964 (Paperback, 2nd Edition): Sally Waller Oxford AQA History for A Level: Tsarist and Communist Russia 1855-1964 (Paperback, 2nd Edition)
Sally Waller
R795 Discovery Miles 7 950 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Retaining well-loved features from the previous editions, Tsarist and Communist Russia has been approved by AQA and matched to the 2015 specifications. This textbook covers AS and A Level content together and covers in breadth issues of change, continuity, and cause and consequence in this period of Russian history through key themes such as how Russia was governed, the extent of social change, and how important were ideologies. Its aim is to enable students to understand and make connections between the six key thematic questions covered in the specification. Students can further develop vital skills such as historical interpretations and source analyses via specially selected sources and extracts. Practice questions and study tips provide additional support to help familiarize students with the new exam style questions, and help them achieve their best in the exam.

Nature's Mutiny - How the Little Ice Age of the Long Seventeenth Century Transformed the West and Shaped the Present... Nature's Mutiny - How the Little Ice Age of the Long Seventeenth Century Transformed the West and Shaped the Present (Hardcover)
Philipp Blom
R519 R412 Discovery Miles 4 120 Save R107 (21%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Although hints of a crisis appeared as early as the 1570s, the temperature by the end of the sixteenth century plummeted so drastically that Mediterranean harbors were covered with ice, birds literally dropped out of the sky, and "frost fairs" were erected on a frozen Thames-with kiosks, taverns, and even brothels that become a semi-permanent part of the city. Recounting the deep legacy and far-ranging consequences of this "Little Ice Age," acclaimed historian Philipp Blom reveals how the European landscape had suddenly, but ineradicably, changed by the mid-seventeenth century. While apocalyptic weather patterns destroyed entire harvests and incited mass migrations, they gave rise to the growth of European cities, the emergence of early capitalism, and the vigorous stirrings of the Enlightenment. A timely examination of how a society responds to profound and unexpected change, Nature's Mutiny will transform the way we think about climate change in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Palmerston - A Biography (Hardcover): David Brown Palmerston - A Biography (Hardcover)
David Brown 1
R678 R630 Discovery Miles 6 300 Save R48 (7%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

A grand and fascinating figure in Victorian politics, the charismatic Lord Palmerston (1784-1865) presided over a period of great political and social change. He served as foreign secretary for fifteen years and prime minister for nine, engaged in struggles with everyone from the Duke of Wellington to Lord John Russell to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, engineered the defeat of the Russians in the Crimean War, and played a major role in the development of liberalism and the Liberal Party. This comprehensive biography, informed by unprecedented research in the statesman's personal archives, gives full weight not only to Palmerston's foreign policy achievements, but also to his domestic political activity, political thought, life as a landlord, and private life and affairs. Through the lens of the period, the book pinpoints for the first time the nature and extent of Palmerston's contributions to the making of modern Britain.

The Boston Freedom Trail - In Words and Pictures (Paperback): Robert Wheeler The Boston Freedom Trail - In Words and Pictures (Paperback)
Robert Wheeler; Photographs by Anna Solo
R252 R157 Discovery Miles 1 570 Save R95 (38%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

A Moving and Informative Guidebook and Keepsake Worthy of Coffee Table Display! Through lyrical paragraphs and poignant black and white images, The Boston Freedom Trail reveals the essence of each site along the Freedom Trail, thereby allowing the reader to be moved and to connect more intimately with the splendor of liberty itself. Said to be the soul of the city, Boston's Freedom Trail embodies the remarkable and courageous spirit of America's unyielding quest for Independence and makes Boston a popular and endearing tourist destination. Beginning within the elegantly manicured grounds of Boston's Common, this trail takes an estimated four million visitors a year on a fascinating 2.5-mile walk through its historic sites-sites enveloped within the city itself, and dotted with cafes, restaurants, bars, hotels, and commerce. In this book, each of these sites, and each name associated with America's independence, whispers endless stories and inspires great dreams. This city's captivating past-and that of the entire American experience-can be discovered on each page, making it an absorbing and everlasting book, one dedicated to the absolute beauty and the luminous tradition of freedom.

The Devil In The White City - Murder, Magic, And Madness At The Fair That Changed America (Paperback, 1st Vintage Books ed):... The Devil In The White City - Murder, Magic, And Madness At The Fair That Changed America (Paperback, 1st Vintage Books ed)
Erik Larson
R365 R246 Discovery Miles 2 460 Save R119 (33%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Bringing Chicago circa 1893 to vivid life, Erik Larson's spellbinding bestseller intertwines the true tale of two men--the brilliant architect behind the legendary 1893 World's Fair, striving to secure America's place in the world; and the cunning serial killer who used the fair to lure his victims to their death. Combining meticulous research with nail-biting storytelling, Erik Larson has crafted a narrative with all the wonder of newly discovered history and the thrills of the best fiction.

The Holy Roman Empire - A Short History (Hardcover): Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger The Holy Roman Empire - A Short History (Hardcover)
Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger; Translated by Yair Mintzker; Preface by Yair Mintzker
R459 R360 Discovery Miles 3 600 Save R99 (22%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

A new interpretation of the Holy Roman Empire that reveals why it was not a failed state as many historians believe The Holy Roman Empire emerged in the Middle Ages as a loosely integrated union of German states and city-states under the supreme rule of an emperor. Around 1500, it took on a more formal structure with the establishment of powerful institutions "such as the Reichstag and Imperial Chamber Court "that would endure more or less intact until the empire's dissolution by Napoleon in 1806. Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger provides a concise history of the Holy Roman Empire, presenting an entirely new interpretation of the empire's political culture and remarkably durable institutions. Rather than comparing the empire to modern states or associations like the European Union, Stollberg-Rilinger shows how it was a political body unlike any other "it had no standing army, no clear boundaries, no general taxation or bureaucracy. She describes a heterogeneous association based on tradition and shared purpose, bound together by personal loyalty and reciprocity, and constantly reenacted by solemn rituals. In a narrative spanning three turbulent centuries, she takes readers from the reform era at the dawn of the sixteenth century to the crisis of the Reformation, from the consolidation of the Peace of Augsburg to the destructive fury of the Thirty Years' War, from the conflict between Austria and Prussia to the empire's downfall in the age of the French Revolution. Authoritative and accessible, The Holy Roman Empire is an incomparable introduction to this momentous period in the history of Europe.

Germany at the Fin De Siecle - Culture, Politics, and Ideas (Hardcover, New): Suzanne L. Marchand, David Lindenfeld Germany at the Fin De Siecle - Culture, Politics, and Ideas (Hardcover, New)
Suzanne L. Marchand, David Lindenfeld
R985 Discovery Miles 9 850 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

The phrase fin de si?cle conjures up images of artistic experimentation and political decadence. The contributors to this volume argue that Wilhelmine Germany -- best known for its industrial and military muscle -- also shared these traits. Their essays look back to the years between 1885 and 1914 to find in Germany a mixture of sociopolitical malaise and experimental exhilaration that was similar in many ways to the better-known cases of France and Austria.

Revising the view that the German Second Reich was merely a precursor to the Third, this broad-scoped study presents pre--World War I Germany in its own fascinating and often contradictory terms. The foundations of the antiliberal passions that would plague the Weimar Republic are evident, but Wilhelmine society also had a lighter, more playful and moderate spirit, one that was largely extinguished by the Great War.

Blending social, cultural, and intellectual history, the contributors -- a distinguished cross-section of older and younger scholars -- trace changing German views on liberalism, penal reform, race, women, art, popular culture, and technology. They juxtapose better-known figures such as Max Weber, Thomas Mann, and Martin Heidegger with now-forgotten individuals like the Jewish feminist novelist Grete Meisel-Hess and the iconoclastic Swiss painter Arnold B?cklin. Their essay topics range from the esoteric and erotic poetry of Stefan George to the Jewish comedy of the Herrnfeld Theater. "Modernity" is examined from the perspectives of bourgeois cinema-goers and judicial reformers, as well as from the viewpoint of Carl Jung. The result is a variegated picture of an unsettled world, rich in its innovations, ambitious in its undertakings, and often apocalyptic in its dreams.

Custer and Me - A Historian's Memory (Hardcover): Robert M. Utley Custer and Me - A Historian's Memory (Hardcover)
Robert M. Utley
R572 Discovery Miles 5 720 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In "Custer and Me," renowned western historian and expert on historic preservation, Robert M. Utley, turns his talents to his own life and career. Through lively personal narrative, Utley offers an insider's view of Park Service workings and problems, both at regional and national levels, during the Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, and Carter administrations. Utley also details the birth of the Western History Association, early national historic-preservation programs, and the many clashes over "symbolic possession" of what is now the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. Readers will discover how a teenager smitten with Custermania came as an adult to appreciate the full complexity of the Battle of the Little Bighorn and its interpretation and to research and write narrative histories of the American West that have appealed to popular audiences while winning highest honors from the scholarly and writing communities.

The House of the Dead - Siberian Exile Under the Tsars (Paperback): Daniel Beer The House of the Dead - Siberian Exile Under the Tsars (Paperback)
Daniel Beer 1
R306 R211 Discovery Miles 2 110 Save R95 (31%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

WINNER OF THE CUNDHILL HISTORY PRIZE 2017 SHORTLISTED FOR THE WOLFSON HISTORY PRIZE 2017, THE PUSHKIN HOUSE RUSSIAN BOOK PRIZE 2017 AND THE LONGMAN-HISTORY TODAY BOOK PRIZE 2017 THE TIMES, SPECTATOR, BBC HISTORY and TLS BOOKS OF THE YEAR 'Masterful, gripping ... filled with astonishing, vivid and heartbreaking stories of crime and punishment, of redemption, love and terrifying violence. It has an amazing cast of despots, murderers, whores and heroes. It's a wonderful read' Simon Sebag Montefiore It was known as 'the vast prison without a roof'. From the beginning of the nineteenth century to the Russian Revolution, the tsarist regime exiled more than one million prisoners and their families beyond the Ural Mountains to Siberia. The House of the Dead, brings to life both the brutal realities of an inhuman system and the tragic and inspiring fates of those who endured it. This is the vividly told history of common criminals and political radicals, the victims of serfdom and village politics, the wives and children who followed husbands and fathers, and of fugitives and bounty-hunters. The tsars looked on Siberia as creating the ultimate political quarantine from the contagions of revolution. Generations of rebels - republicans, nationalists and socialists - were condemned to oblivion thousands of kilometres from European Russia. Over the nineteenth century, however, these political exiles transformed Siberia's mines, prisons and remote settlements into an enormous laboratory of revolution. This masterly work of original research taps a mass of almost unknown primary evidence held in Russian and Siberian archives to tell the epic story both of Russia's struggle to govern its monstrous penal colony and Siberia's ultimate, decisive impact on the political forces of the modern world. 'An absolutely fascinating book, rich in fact and anecdote.' - David Aaronovitch 'A splendid example of academic scholarship for a public audience. Yet even though he is an impressively calm and sober narrator, the injustices and atrocities pile up on every page.' - Dominic Sandbrook 'A superb, colourful history of Siberian exile under the tsars' - The Times

A Lady's Ranch Life in Montana (Hardcover, illustrated edition): I.F. Randall, R. L. Saunders A Lady's Ranch Life in Montana (Hardcover, illustrated edition)
I.F. Randall, R. L. Saunders
R653 Discovery Miles 6 530 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

"A faithful and unvarnished Record of a Settler's Life" is how Isabel Randall described her letters when they were first published in 1887. Many foreign travelers published accounts of their visits to the American West, but Randall was one of the few European women to write about the western experience from the inside.

In 1884 Randall and her husband settled on a ranch in Montana hoping to make their fortune in the livestock boom. Randall's letters home to England describe the practical affairs of daily life, rural social interactions, and the natural world around her. Her letters are cheerful, but they also suggest why the Randalls ultimately failed to achieve financial success.

In this new edition of "A Lady's Ranch Life in Montana," Richard L. Saunders supplements Randall's letters with notes and an extensive introduction drawn from a wealth of primary sources. He sketches the Randalls' lives before and after their western adventure, describes the stock industry that drew them to Montana, places Isabel's letters in the context of English attitudes toward Americans, and discusses her neighbors' reactions to her criticisms of local society.

Papers George Washington Vol 14 Mar-April 1778 (Hardcover): Papers George Washington Vol 14 Mar-April 1778 (Hardcover)
R2,043 Discovery Miles 20 430 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Volume 14 of the Revolutionary War Series opens on 1 March 1778 with Washington praising his troops for their "uncomplaining Patience during the scarcity of provisions in Camp" and exhorting them to persevere in the face of any "occasional" shortages that might yet occur. Indeed, the documents generated during these two months of the army's stay at Valley Forge demonstrate that although the crisis had passed, shortages, especially of clothing, continued to concern Washington. The problem was magnified as the commander in chief turned his attention to gathering men and supplies for the upcoming summer campaign. The questionable readiness of the army was a constant theme of his correspondence. The campaign preparations also included training, which was hampered by a serious shortage of officers despite Washington's efforts to discourage resignations and absenteeism. To alleviate that problem, Washington continued to urge Congress to make the reforms that he had recommended to improve the status and organization of the officer corps. Meanwhile, systematic drills commenced under the inspection of Steuben and increased army discipline.

Washington and British general William Howe took advantage of the relative inaction of their armies to conduct prisoner exchange negotiations that ultimately broke down over questions about the generals' status and authority, but the months were not without military action. British and American foraging led to significant skirmishes in New Jersey and lesser activity in Pennsylvania. There Washington also wrestled with questions about how to treat those inhabitants who carried goods to sell to the enemy and those, such as the Quakers, who were considered unfriendly to the American cause. The problem of disunity among Americans also leaped to Washington's attention in mid-April when news of a peace initiative in the British Parliament reached Pennsylvania. He urged immediate efforts to counter the "insidious proceeding."

By late April, Washington was ready to consult his generals about plans for the ensuing campaign, asking whether it would be best to attempt to drive the British from Philadelphia by assault or siege, to shift the campaign with a strike against New York City, or to remain in camp drilling the army until the British took the field. The generals' replies were instructive, but the "glorious news" of the treaty of alliance with France, which reached Washington as this volume closes, ensured that a subsequent conference, called for early May, would have new factors to consider.

Victorians Undone - Tales of the Flesh in the Age of Decorum (Hardcover, Epub Edition): Kathryn Hughes Victorians Undone - Tales of the Flesh in the Age of Decorum (Hardcover, Epub Edition)
Kathryn Hughes 1
R485 R339 Discovery Miles 3 390 Save R146 (30%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

`Victorians Undone is the most original history book I have read in a long while' Daily Mail A SUNDAY TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR * AN OBSERVER BOOK OF THE YEAR * A BBC HISTORY MAGAZINE BOOK OF THE YEAR A groundbreaking account of what it was like to live in a Victorian body from one of our best historians. Why did the great philosophical novelist George Eliot feel so self-conscious that her right hand was larger than her left? Exactly what made Darwin grow that iconic beard in 1862, a good five years after his contemporaries had all retired their razors? Who knew Queen Victoria had a personal hygiene problem as a young woman and the crisis that followed led to a hurried commitment to marry Albert? What did John Sell Cotman, a handsome drawing room operator who painted some of the most exquisite watercolours the world has ever seen, feel about marrying a woman whose big nose made smart people snigger? How did a working-class child called Fanny Adams disintegrate into pieces in 1867 before being reassembled into a popular joke, one we still reference today, but would stop, appalled, if we knew its origins? Kathryn Hughes follows a thickened index finger or deep baritone voice into the realms of social history, medical discourse, aesthetic practise and religious observance - its language is one of admiring glances, cruel sniggers, an implacably turned back. The result is an eye-opening, deeply intelligent, groundbreaking account that brings the Victorians back to life and helps us understand how they lived their lives.

The Overland Mail, 1849-1869 - Promoter of Settlement Precursor of Railroads (Paperback): LeRoy R. Hafen The Overland Mail, 1849-1869 - Promoter of Settlement Precursor of Railroads (Paperback)
LeRoy R. Hafen; Edited by David Dary
R420 Discovery Miles 4 200 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In the development of the American West, no two decades were so full of romance and change as the years from the California gold rush of 1849 to the completion of the first transcontinental railroad in 1869. In two decades, the West was conquered and the secession movement rose and fell. From slow ox-team and prairie schooner to the dashing Pony Express, the overland mail service mirrored these monumental strides.

Originally published in 1926, "The Overland Mail" was the first scholarly work to examine the impact of the postal service on the expansion of the West as the service evolved from a private endeavor to a government-contracted business. LeRoy R. Hafen details how the mail service tied West to East, influenced politics and economics, promoted use of the overland trails, aided in settlement, and helped usher in the railroads.

This classic work is here available in paperback for the first time. In a new foreword, David Dary assesses Hafen's contributions as a writer and historian.

Almanach de Gotha 2019 - Volume II (Hardcover): John James Almanach de Gotha 2019 - Volume II (Hardcover)
John James
R1,468 R1,324 Discovery Miles 13 240 Save R144 (10%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days
Remarks and Collections of Thomas Hearne voL. II (Hardcover, 1886 ed): Thomas Hearne Remarks and Collections of Thomas Hearne voL. II (Hardcover, 1886 ed)
Thomas Hearne; Edited by C. E Doble
R840 Discovery Miles 8 400 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days
The Papers of George Washington  December 1777-February 1778 (Hardcover, New): George Washington The Papers of George Washington December 1777-February 1778 (Hardcover, New)
George Washington; Edited by Edward G. Lengel, Philander D. Chase
R2,043 Discovery Miles 20 430 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Volume 13 of the "Revolutionary War Series" documents a crucial portion of the winter encampment at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, when the fate of Washington's army hung in the balance. The volume begins with Washington's soldiers hard at work erecting log huts to the general's specifications and building a bridge over the Schuylkill River under the direction of Major General John Sullivan. Most of the fighting that characterized the bloody year of 1777 had drawn to a close by Christmas, and although British foraging and raiding parties ventured out of Philadelphia from time to time, Washington's priority was no longer to fight General William Howe but to preserve his own army and prepare it for the next campaign.

The American army was badly in need of reform. Attrition and ineffective recruitment had left most of the Continental regiments dangerously weak, and the rising pace of officer resignations made apparent the need for an equitable pay and pensionary establishment. At the same time the battle losses of the previous summer and autumn had exposed severe problems in military organization, drill, and discipline. Washington hoped that a congressional camp committee would rectify some of these problems, and after consulting his officers on army organization, he submitted to the committee one of the longest, most detailed, and most thoughtful letters he ever wrote. The arrival in camp of a Prussian volunteer who styled himself the Baron von Steuben, meanwhile, promised to bring about improvements in drill and discipline. Washington also had to look to his own authority, as a dispute with Major Generals Thomas Conway and Horatio Gates seemingly threatened to undermine his command of the Continental army.

The turning point of the Valley Forge encampment came in February 1778, when a provision shortage led to what Washington called a "fatal crisis" that threatened the continued existence of the army. Poor management of the commissary department and a breakdown of transport, resulting from bad weather and an insufficiency of wagons, combined to bring about a logistical collapse that brought provision supplies almost to a halt. For many days bread was scarce and meat almost nonexistent. Soldiers, many dressed literally in rags because of the incompetence of the clothier general, threatened mutiny. Washington's efforts to save his army in this crisis mark one of the highest points of his military career and make up an important part of this volume.

Fort Limhi - The Mormon Adventure in Oregon Territory 1855-1858 (Hardcover): David L Bigler Fort Limhi - The Mormon Adventure in Oregon Territory 1855-1858 (Hardcover)
David L Bigler
R883 Discovery Miles 8 830 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In 1855 the Mormons established a mission at the foot of famous Lemhi Pass near Salmon River, where the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery first crossed the Continental Divide and Sacagawea was reunited with her brother. Fort Limhi was, at first, part of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' outreach to the Indians throughout the West. But the mission soon assumed a critical role in Brigham Young's plans for the Saints as they faced the imminent confrontation with the U.S. government which came to be known as the Utah War.

"Fort Limhi: The Mormon Adventure in Oregon Territory" is an innovative account of a fascinating but forgotten story.

Journals, diaries, letters and recollections of the men and women who served at the mission during the three years of its existence provide a wealth of information about native history and culture in eastern Idaho. The Mormon missionaries intentionally selected a spot that put them at the crossroads of ancient trails used by Nez Perce, Shoshone, Bannock, and Flathead bands as they battled each other and pursued their annual pilgrimages to trade, harvest salmon, and hunt buffalo. The sources also cast important light on little-known trails followed by Indians, traders, and emigrants.

Ordinary western folk who survived an extraordinary exploit tell their stories in their own words, and these narratives are dramatic, compelling, ironic, enlightening, and downright fun. With its astonishing fish stories, desperate Indian battles, life-threatening chases, and heroic rides to rescue a terrified and helpless outpost, this work has all the elements of a great frontier novel. It even tells of the star-crossed love of Lewis Shurtliff and Louisa Moore, whose romance, like the story of Fort Limhi, came to a tragic ending.

Historians often seemed baffled by Brigham Young's visit to Fort Limhi in 1857 while the fires of the Mormon Reformation burned in Utah and the territory's relationship with the federal government was collapsing. Young's trip was far more than a vacation for his family and advisors. As award-winning author David Bigler reveals, the Salmon River Indian Mission played a pivotal role in the resolution of the Utah War of 1857-1858. The catastrophe that ended the colony at Fort Limhi brought Utah back from the very brink of war with the United States.

"Fort Limhi" provides new material on the obscure fur-trade veterans and misfits who called themselves "mountaineers" (the contemporary term for that "majority of scoundrels" now known as the fearless "Mountain Men") and sheds light on their contentious relations with their Mormon neighbors.

The story of Fort Limhi has long deserved a larger role in the history of Idaho and Montana. It provides new insights into the role of Mormons in the West and their Indian relations, and explains some long-standing puzzles about the Utah War of 1857-1858.

The Tiger and the Ruby - A Journey to the Other Side of British India (Hardcover): Kief Hillsbery The Tiger and the Ruby - A Journey to the Other Side of British India (Hardcover)
Kief Hillsbery 1
R446 R282 Discovery Miles 2 820 Save R164 (37%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In 1841, Nigel Halleck left Britain as a clerk in the East India Company. He served in the colonial administration for eight years before leaving his post, eventually disappearing in the mountain kingdom of Nepal, never to be heard from again. A century-and-a-half later, Kief Hillsbery, Nigel's nephew many times removed, sets out to unravel the mystery. Tracing his ancestor's journey across the subcontinent, his quest takes him from Lahore to Calcutta, and finally to the palaces of Kathmandu. What emerges is an unexpected personal chapter in the history of the British Empire in India.

Legacy of Disunion - The Enduring Significance of the American Civil War (Hardcover): Susan-Mary Grant, Peter J. Parish Legacy of Disunion - The Enduring Significance of the American Civil War (Hardcover)
Susan-Mary Grant, Peter J. Parish
R665 R515 Discovery Miles 5 150 Save R150 (23%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Transatlantic views on the consequences of the central event in American history The conviction that the American Civil War left a massive legacy to the country has generally been much clearer than the definition of what that legacy is. Did the war, as Ulysses S. Grant believed, bequeath power, intelligence, and sectional harmony to America, or did it, as many have argued since, sow racial and regional bitterness that has blighted the nation since 1865? What, exactly, was the legacy of disunion? This collection explores that question from a variety of angles, showcasing the work of twelve scholars from the United States and the United Kingdom. The essays ponder the role of history, myth, and media in sustaining the memory of the war and its racial implications in the South; Abraham Lincoln's legacy; and the war's consequences in less studied areas, such as civil-military relations and constitutional and legal history. By juxtaposing American and non-American interpretations, this stimulating volume reveals aspects of the war's legacy that from a purely American viewpoint are sometimes too close for comfort. Contributors; Bruce Collins, Robert Cook, Richard N. Current, Susan-Mary Grant, Charles W. Joyner, Patricia Lucie, James M. McPherson, Peter J. Parish, Brian Holden Reid, Jeffrey Leigh Sedgwick, Adam P. Smith, Melvyn Stokes

A Sphinx on the American Land - The Nineteenth-century South in Comparative Perspective (Hardcover): Peter Kolchin A Sphinx on the American Land - The Nineteenth-century South in Comparative Perspective (Hardcover)
Peter Kolchin
R447 R354 Discovery Miles 3 540 Save R93 (21%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Coming to grips with southern history by examining the un-South, the many Souths, and the other Souths One reason that the South attracts so much interest is that its history inevitably involves big questions--continuity versus change, slavery and freedom, the meaning of "race, " the formation of national identity. Because these issues are central to human experience, southern history properly conceived is of more than regional interest. In A Sphinx on the American Land, Peter Kolchin explores three comparative frameworks for the study of the nineteenth-century South in an effort to nudge the subject away from provincialism and toward the kind of global concerns that are already transforming it into one of the most innovative fields of historical research. The volume opens with a comparison between the South and the North, or what Kolchin terms the "un-South." Turning to the cohesion and variations among what he calls the "many Souths, " Kolchin reminds us that there Coming to grips with southern history by examining the un-South, the many Souths, and the other SouthsOne reason that the South attracts so much interest is that its history inevitably involves big questions--continuity versus change, slavery and freedom, the meaning of "race, " the formation of national identity. Because these issues are central to human experience, southern history properly conceived is of more than regional interest. In A Sphinx on the American Land, Peter Kolchin explores three comparative frameworks for the study of the nineteenth-century South in an effort to nudge the subject away from provincialism and toward the kind of global concerns that are already transforming it into one of the most innovativefields of historical research. The volume opens with a comparison between the South and the North, or what Kolchin terms the "un-South." Turning to the cohesion and variations among what he calls the "many Souths, " Kolchin reminds us that there has never been one South or archetypal southerner. Finally, he explores parallels between the South and regions outside the United States--the "other Souths--Russia most notably. Kolchin examines how scholars have approached each of his comparative frameworks and how they might do so in the future, making his book at once a work of history and of historiography. Illustrating the ways in which southern history is also American history and world history, this elegant, profound volume proves Kolchin to be one of the stellar southern historians of his generation.

The Sutter Family and the Origins of Gold-rush Sacremento (Paperback, Annotated edition): J.A. Sutter The Sutter Family and the Origins of Gold-rush Sacremento (Paperback, Annotated edition)
J.A. Sutter
R411 Discovery Miles 4 110 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

John A. Sutter (1803-1880) could have become one of the richest men in California when gold was found on his property. Instead he lost his vast land holdings on the Sacramento and Feather Rivers and eventually left California penniless. Sutter always claimed to be the victim of charlatans, but he bore considerable responsibility for his downfall. He had amassed huge debts before the gold discovery and added even more afterward. In the rough dealings of frontier capitalism in gold-rush California, Sutter was easy prey.

Soon after the gold discovery, Sutter's eldest son, John A. Sutter, Jr. (1826-1897), arrived. Born and raised in Switzerland, John, Jr., had not seen his father since 1834 when the patriarch fled to avoid debtors' prison. He tried to save his father's estate, but in the attempt, John, Jr., became the dupe of speculating businessmen and a physician who concocted a bold land swindle.

Somehow, in the midst of these hardships, John, Jr., managed to found Sacramento. However, ill and disgusted with his experiences, he soon left for Mexico. Hoping to obtain compensation for the land that he had lost, he returned to California in 1855 to give his lawyer a thorough statement cataloging how he and his father were swindled. This extensive document describes the dirty deals of the first great gold rush in the western United States.

Napoleon and Berlin - The Franco-Prussian War in Northern Germany, 1813 (Hardcover, New edition): Michael V. Leggiere Napoleon and Berlin - The Franco-Prussian War in Northern Germany, 1813 (Hardcover, New edition)
Michael V. Leggiere
R578 Discovery Miles 5 780 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

At a time when Napoleon needed all his forces to reassert French dominance in Central Europe, why did he fixate on the Prussian capital of Berlin? Instead of concentrating his forces for a decisive showdown with the enemy, he repeatedly detached large numbers of troops, under ineffective commanders, toward the capture of Berlin. In "Napoleon and Berlin, " Michael V. Leggiere explores Napoleon's almost obsessive desire to capture Berlin and how this strategy ultimately lost him all of Germany.

Napoleon's motives have remained a subject of controversy from his own day until ours. He may have hoped to deliver a tremendous blow to Prussia's war-making capacity and morale. Ironically, the heavy losses and strategic reverses sustained by the French left Napoleon's Grande Armee vulnerable to an Allied coalition that eventually drove Napoleon from Central Europe forever.

Napoleon - Passion, Death and Resurrection 1815-1840 (Paperback): Philip Dwyer Napoleon - Passion, Death and Resurrection 1815-1840 (Paperback)
Philip Dwyer 1
R258 R202 Discovery Miles 2 020 Save R56 (22%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

'Vibrant and illuminating ... [Dywer] tells a fascinating tale' The Times

This meticulously researched study opens with Napoleon no longer in power, but instead a prisoner on the island of St Helena. This may have been a great fall from power, but Napoleon still held immense attraction. Every day, huge crowds would gather on the far shore in the hope of catching a glimpse of him.

Philip Dwyer closes his ambitious trilogy exploring Napoleon's life, legacy and myth by moving from those first months of imprisonment, through the years of exile, up to death and then beyond, examining how the foundations of legend that had been laid by Napoleon during his lifetime continued to be built upon by his followers. This is a fitting and authoritative end to a definitive work.

Maya Wars - Ethnographic Accounts from Nineteenth-century Yucatan (Hardcover): T. Rugeley Maya Wars - Ethnographic Accounts from Nineteenth-century Yucatan (Hardcover)
T. Rugeley
R575 Discovery Miles 5 750 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

"Maya Wars" is the first collection of documents devoted entirely to the nineteenth-century Yucatec Mayas. This compilation includes writings by priests, missionaries, Hispanic officials and military officers, foreign travelers and explorers, and the Mayas themselves. It follows the Mayas through the early national republic, the upheavals of the mid-century Caste War (1847-1901), the short-lived period of French Imperialism (1864-1867), and the repressive monoculture of the century's last two decades.

Providing an unparalleled window into the daily lives of the rural Mayas, the book covers social organization, religion, family life, agriculture, recreation, military readiness, and medicinal beliefs and practices. In addition, rare captivity narratives offer insight into the experiences of prisoners of war held by Caste War rebels.

Terry Rugeley's concise introductions to the documents and helpful notes place this material in historical and cultural context, and his clear translations of the Spanish and Maya documents into English make them easily readable.

General Crook and the Western Frontier (Hardcover): Charles M Robinson General Crook and the Western Frontier (Hardcover)
Charles M Robinson
R475 R382 Discovery Miles 3 820 Save R93 (20%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

General George Crook was one of the most prominent soldiers in the frontier West. General William T. Sherman called him the greatest Indian fighter and manager the army ever had. And yet, on hearing of Crook's death, the Sioux chief Red Cloud lamented, "He, at least, never lied to us." As a young officer in the Pacific Northwest, Crook emphasized training and marksmanship--innovative ideas in the antebellum army.

Crook's career in the West began with successful campaigns against the Apaches that resulted in his promotion to brigadier general. His campaign against the Lakota and Cheyennes was less successful, however, as he alternately displayed deep insight, egotism, indecision, and fear.

Charles M. Robinson pieces together the contradictions of Crook's career to reveal that although the general sometimes micromanaged his campaigns to the point that his officers had virtually no flexibility, he gave his officers so much freedom on other occasions that they did not fully understand his expectations or objectives. Crook resented any criticism and was quick to blame both subordinates and superiors, yet Robinson shows that much of Crook's success in the Indian wars can be attributed to the efforts of subordinate officers. He also details Crook's later efforts to provide equal rights and opportunities for American Indians. "General Crook and the Western Frontier," the first full-scale biography of Crook, uses contemporary manuscripts and primary sources to illuminate the general's personal life and military career.

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