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Books > History > World history > 1750 to 1900

Dreamer-prophets of the Columbia Plateau - Smohalla and Skolaskin (Paperback): Robert H. Ruby Dreamer-prophets of the Columbia Plateau - Smohalla and Skolaskin (Paperback)
Robert H. Ruby
R417 Discovery Miles 4 170 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Seekers after wisdom have always been drawn to American Indian ritual and symbol. This history of two nineteenth-century Dreamer-Prophets, Smohalla and Skolaskin, will interest those who seek a better understanding of the traditional Native American commitment to Mother Earth, visionary experiences drawn from ceremony, and the promise of revitalization implicit in the Ghost Dance.

To white observers, the Dreamers appeared to imitate Christianity by celebrating the sabbath and preaching a covenant with God, nonviolence, and life after death. But the Prophets also advocated adherence to traditional dress and subsistence patterns and to the spellbinding Washat dance. By engaging in this dance and by observing traditional life-ways, the Prophets claimed, the living Indians might bring their dead back to life and drive the whites from the earth. They themselves brought heaven to earth, they said, by "dying, going there, and returning," in trances induced by the Washat drums.

The Prophets' sacred longhouses became rallying points for resistance to the United States government. As many as two thousand Indians along the Columbia River, from various tribes, followed the Dreamer religion. Although the Dreamers always opposed war, the active phase of the movement was brought to a close in 1889 when the United States Army incarcerated the younger Prophet Skolaskin at Alcatraz. Smohalla died of old age in 1894.

Modern Dreamers of the Columbia plateau still celebrate the Feast of the New Foods in springtime as did their spiritual ancestors. This book contains rare modern photographs of their Washat dances.

Readers of Indian history and religion will be fascinated by the descriptions of the Dreamer-Prophets' unique personalities and their adjustments to physical handicaps. Neglected by scholars, their role in the important pan-Indian revitalization movement has awaited the detailed treatment given here by Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown.

1865 Customs of Service for Non-Commissioned Officers and Soldiers (Hardcover, 1st Stackpole ed): August V. Kautz 1865 Customs of Service for Non-Commissioned Officers and Soldiers (Hardcover, 1st Stackpole ed)
August V. Kautz
R264 Discovery Miles 2 640 Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Reproduction edition of the Civil War era guidebook Indispensable for historians and reenactors

This was the Civil War soldier's and NCO's "how-to" guide to military duties in garrison and in the field. It covers of all ranks and services: infantry, cavalry, artillery, ordnance, quartermaster, signal, saddlers, hospital stewards, cooks, bands, as well as spies, pickets, expressmen, special forces. There is much quaint yet practical advice on survival, cooking and nutrition, pay, punishment, prisoners of war, and many long-extinct soldier skills. It contains the Articles of War used during the Civil War.

They Fought Like Demons - Women Soldiers in the American Civil War (Hardcover): DeAnne Blanton, Lauren M. Cook They Fought Like Demons - Women Soldiers in the American Civil War (Hardcover)
DeAnne Blanton, Lauren M. Cook
R599 R468 Discovery Miles 4 680 Save R131 (22%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days
Napoleon - The End of Glory (Paperback): Munro Price Napoleon - The End of Glory (Paperback)
Munro Price
R316 R246 Discovery Miles 2 460 Save R70 (22%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Napoleon: The End of Glory tells the story of the dramatic two years that led to Napoleon's abdication in April 1814. Though crucial to European history, they remain strangely neglected, lying between the two much better-known landmarks of the retreat from Moscow and the battle of Waterloo. Yet this short period saw both Napoleon's loss of his European empire, and of his control over France itself. In 1813 the massive battle of Leipzig - the bloodiest in modern history before the first day of the Somme - forced his armies back to the Rhine. The next year, after a brilliant campaign against overwhelming odds, Napoleon was forced to abdicate and exiled to Elba. He regained his throne the following year, for just a hundred days, in a doomed adventure whose defeat at Waterloo was predictable. The most fascinating - and least-known - aspect of these years is that at several key points Napoleon's enemies offered him peace terms that would have allowed him to keep his throne, if not his empire, a policy inspired by the brilliant and devious Austrian foreign minister Metternich. Napoleon: The End of Glory sheds fascinating new light on Napoleon, Metternich, and many other key figures and events in this dramatic period of European history, drawing on previously unused archives in France, Austria, and the Czech Republic. Through these it seeks to answer the most important question of all - why, instead of accepting a compromise, Napoleon chose to gamble on total victory at the risk of utter defeat?

The Wild Girl, Natural Man and the Monster - Dangerous Experiments in the Age of Enlightenment (Paperback, 2nd ed.): Julia V.... The Wild Girl, Natural Man and the Monster - Dangerous Experiments in the Age of Enlightenment (Paperback, 2nd ed.)
Julia V. Douthwaite
R727 Discovery Miles 7 270 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

This study looks at the lives of the most famous "wild children" of eighteenth-century Europe, showing how they open a window onto European ideas about the potential and perfectibility of mankind. Julia V. Douthwaite recounts reports of feral children, such as the wild girl of Champagne (captured in 1731 and baptized as Marie-Angelique Leblanc), and offers a fascinating glimpse into beliefs about the difference between man and beast, and the means once used to civilize the uncivilized. A variety of educational experiments failed to tame these feral children by the standards of the day. After telling their stories, Douthwaite turns to literature that reflects upon similar experiments to perfect human subjects. Her examples range from utopian schemes for progressive childrearing to philosophical tales of animated statues, from revolutionary theories of regenerated men to Gothic tales of scientists run amok. Encompassing thinkers such as Rousseau, Sade, Defoe, and Mary Shelley as well as many lesser-known diarists, journalists, scientists, and novelists, Douthwaite shows how the Enlightenment conceived of mankind as an infinitely malleable entity, first with optimism, then with growing apprehension. Exposing the darker side of eighteenth-century thought, she demonstrates how advances in science gave rise to troubling new ethical concerns, as parents joined scientists and politicians in trying to perfect mankind - with disastrous results.

Mountain Meadows Massacre - Collected Legal Papers, Initial Investigations and Indictments (Hardcover, Volume 1 ed.): Richard E... Mountain Meadows Massacre - Collected Legal Papers, Initial Investigations and Indictments (Hardcover, Volume 1 ed.)
Richard E Turley, Janiece L Johnson, Lajean Purcell Carruth
R1,428 Discovery Miles 14 280 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days
The Influencing Machine - James Tilly Matthews and the Air Loom (Paperback): Mike Jay The Influencing Machine - James Tilly Matthews and the Air Loom (Paperback)
Mike Jay
R333 R272 Discovery Miles 2 720 Save R61 (18%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

London in the 1790s, Europe is in turmoil and war with France is looming. James Matthews, an Welsh tea merchant and anti war advocate who holds covert meeting with both the English and the French leaders. But Matthews believes that his mind is being controlled by revolutionary terrorists and a secret machine called the Air Loom. He is promptly declared mad and send to Bedlam. Here his delusions are celebrated as the most complex and bizarre ever recorded and strangely many of the incredible events he claims to have been involved in are entirely true.

Mountain Meadows Massacre - Collected Legal Papers, Selected Trial Records and Aftermath (Hardcover, Volume 2 ed.): Richard E... Mountain Meadows Massacre - Collected Legal Papers, Selected Trial Records and Aftermath (Hardcover, Volume 2 ed.)
Richard E Turley, Janiece L Johnson, Lajean Purcell Carruth
R1,424 Discovery Miles 14 240 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days
Palaces of Pleasure (Hardcover): Lee Jackson Palaces of Pleasure (Hardcover)
Lee Jackson
R480 R385 Discovery Miles 3 850 Save R95 (20%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

An energetic and exhilarating account of the Victorian entertainment industry, its extraordinary success and enduring impact

The Victorians invented mass entertainment. As the nineteenth century’s growing industrialized class acquired the funds and the free time to pursue leisure activities, their every whim was satisfied by entrepreneurs building new venues for popular amusement. Contrary to their reputation as dour, buttoned-up prudes, the Victorians reveled in these newly created ‘palaces of pleasure’.

In this vivid, captivating book, Lee Jackson charts the rise of well-known institutions such as gin palaces, music halls, seaside resorts and football clubs, as well as the more peculiar attractions of the pleasure garden and international exposition, ranging from parachuting monkeys and human zoos to theme park thrill rides. He explores how vibrant mass entertainment came to dominate leisure time and how the attempts of religious groups and secular improvers to curb ‘immorality’ in the pub, variety theater and dance hall faltered in the face of commercial success.

The Victorians’ unbounded love of leisure created a nationally significant and influential economic force: the modern entertainment industry.

Army Regulars on the Western Frontier, 1848-1861 (Hardcover): L.D. Ball Army Regulars on the Western Frontier, 1848-1861 (Hardcover)
L.D. Ball
R523 Discovery Miles 5 230 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Deployed to posts from the Missouri River to the Pacific in 1848, the United States Army undertook an old mission on frontiers new to the United States: occupying the western territories; suppressing American Indian resistance; keeping the peace among feuding Indians, Hispanics, and Anglos; and consolidating United States sovereignty in the region. Overshadowing and complicating the frontier military mission were the politics of slavery and the growing rift between the North and South.

As regular troops fanned out across the American West, the diverse inhabitants of the region intensified their competition for natural resources, political autonomy, and cultural survival. Their conflicts often erupted into violence that propelled the army into riot duty and bloody warfare. Examining the full continuum of martial force in the American West, Durwood Ball reveals how regular troops waged war on American Indians to enforce federal law. He also provides details on the army's military interventions against filibusters in Texas and California, Mormon rebels in Utah, and violent political partisans in Kansas. Unlike previous histories, this book argues that the politics of slavery profoundly influenced the western mission of the regular army -- affecting the hearts and minds of officers and enlisted men both as the nation plummeted toward civil war.

Cavalier in Buckskin - George Armstrong Custer and the Western Military Frontier (Paperback, 2nd Revised edition): Robert M.... Cavalier in Buckskin - George Armstrong Custer and the Western Military Frontier (Paperback, 2nd Revised edition)
Robert M. Utley
R396 R317 Discovery Miles 3 170 Save R79 (20%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

George Armstrong Custer. The name evokes instant recognition in almost every American and in people around the world. No figure in the history of the American West has more powerfully moved the human imagination.

When originally published in 1988, Cavalier in Buckskin met with critical acclaim. Now Robert M. Utley has revised his best-selling biography of General George Armstrong Custer. In his preface to the revised edition, Utley writes about his summers (1947-1952) spent as a historical aide at the Custer Battlefield-as it was then known-and credits the work of several authors whose recent scholarship has illuminated our understanding of the events of Little Bighorn. He has revised or expanded chapters, added new information on sources, and revised the map of the battlefield.

When the Texans Came - Missing Records from the Civil War in the Southwest, 1861-1862 (Hardcover, 1st ed): John P. Wilson When the Texans Came - Missing Records from the Civil War in the Southwest, 1861-1862 (Hardcover, 1st ed)
John P. Wilson
R471 R378 Discovery Miles 3 780 Save R93 (20%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

The reports and letters brought to light by John P. Wilson in this remarkable collection offer new perspectives on the Civil War in the West. He documents, for example, the activities of Kit Carson, William Brady, and other well known figures whose roles in the Civil War have been incompletely understood; highlights for the first time the dedicated service of native New Mexican officers; unravels the sophisticated espionage (and the brutal executions of suspected spies) carried out by both sides; demonstrates how this national drama took place against the backdrop of ongoing Indian Warswith the Apaches, the Navajos, and even the Kiowasthat ensnared both Union and Confederate armies; and elucidates the unprecedented ways in which the conflict militarized the Southwest for decades.

The 282 letters, song lyrics, casualty lists, intelligence dispatches, transcripts of witness testimony, newspaper accounts, and official reports of battles that appear here build upon the massive anthology of Civil War documentation first published in "War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies" (128 volumes, 1881-1901). Wilsons book supplements that source by including previously unavailable materials that historians, scholars, students, and Civil War buffs will find invaluable and intriguing.

Liberty's Exiles - The Loss of America and the Remaking of the British Empire. (Paperback): Maya Jasanoff Liberty's Exiles - The Loss of America and the Remaking of the British Empire. (Paperback)
Maya Jasanoff 1
R350 R244 Discovery Miles 2 440 Save R106 (30%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

`More than just a work of first-class scholarship, Liberty's Exiles is a deeply moving masterpiece that fulfils the historian's most challenging ambition: to revivify past experience.' Niall Ferguson Liberty's Exiles was shortlisted for the 2011 BBC Samuel Johnson Prize. Early in the afternoon of 25 November 1783, the American Revolution was finally over; the British were gone, the patriots were back and a key moment inscribed itself in the annals of the emerging United States. Territorial independence from Great Britain had effectively begun. In 'Liberty's Exiles', Maya Jasanoff examines the realities of the end of the Revolution, through looking at the lives of the Loyalist refugees - those men and women who took Britain's side. She tells the story of Elizabeth Johnston from Savannah, whose family went on to settle in St Augustine, Scotland, Jamaica and Nova Scotia; Reverend Jacob Bailey, who fled from New England across rough seas to Canada with his family and little more than the clothes on his back; five-year-old Catherine Skinner - the daughter of a loyalist - who was trapped as a prisoner in her home, hiding from the gunshots of rebel raiders. Their experiences speak eloquently of a larger history of exile, mobility and the shaping of the British Empire in the wake of the American War. Beautifully written and rich with source material, 'Liberty's Exiles' is a history of the American Revolution unlike any before.

Jewish Politics in Eastern Europe - The Bund at 100 (Hardcover): Jack Jacobs Jewish Politics in Eastern Europe - The Bund at 100 (Hardcover)
Jack Jacobs
R1,872 Discovery Miles 18 720 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

"This book is basic for any attempt to understand interwar Polish Jewry as well as the holocaust period and offers many new points of view."
--"Religious Studies Review"

The Bund was the first modern Jewish political party in Eastern Europe and, arguably, the strongest Jewish party in Poland on the eve of the Second World War. Though 100 years have passed since its inception, the Bund and its legacy continue to be of abiding interest.

Founded illegally and operated under the most adverse conditions, the Bund grew dramatically in the years immediately after its 1897 creation in Czarist Russia. It helped to organize the Russian Social Democratic Workers Party, it organized armed self-defense groups to fight against pogroms, and it played a significant role in the Russian Revolution of 1905. The Bundist became for many the symbol of the new Jew--enlightened, willing to fight for Jewish rights and needs, and unwilling to accept the status quo of Jewish communities dominated by the orthodox and the wealthy, and of a Russia oppressed by the Czar. Later, Bundist members were among those who contributed substantially to armed resistance in Nazi occupied Poland.

"Jewish Politics in Eastern Europe" makes use of previously unexamined source materials to offer a range of new perspectives on the significance of the Bund and its ideas. Its fresh and insightful approaches will be of interest to all those concerned with Eastern European Jewry, Russian, Polish, and Ukranian history, and the history of socialist and labor movements.

When the Eagle Screamed - The Romantic Horizon in American Expansionism, 1800-1860 (Paperback, New edition): William H Goetzmann When the Eagle Screamed - The Romantic Horizon in American Expansionism, 1800-1860 (Paperback, New edition)
William H Goetzmann
R239 Discovery Miles 2 390 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Written in a lively style, When the Eagle Screamed argues that America's expansionism between 1800 and 1860 positioned it against some of the world's most powerful and aggressive nations. As the United States moved onto the world scene in this age of Manifest Destiny, it clashed with Britain, France, Russia, Spain, and Mexico. The struggle for Texas and Oregon, the war with Mexico, the postwar adventures and skirmishes in the Caribbean, the penetration of South America and the Far East, the competition for Antarctica and the South Sea Islands, and the drawing of the great Pacific border at Hawaii -- all, William Goetzmann argues, arose from romantic ideals of grandeur and destiny. For this edition the author provides a new preface and updated bibliography.

The American West (Paperback, Ed): Dee Brown The American West (Paperback, Ed)
Dee Brown
R219 R142 Discovery Miles 1 420 Save R77 (35%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

As the railroads opened up the American West to settlers in the last half of the 19th Century, the Plains Indians made their final stand and cattle ranches spread from Texas to Montana. Eminent Western author Dee Brown here illuminates the struggle between these three groups as they fought for a place in this new landscape. The result is both a spirited national saga and an authoritative historical account of the drive for order in an uncharted wilderness, illustrated throughout with maps, photographs and ephemera from the period.

Girl in Black and White - The Story of Mary Mildred Williams and the Abolition Movement (Hardcover): Jessie Morgan-Owens Girl in Black and White - The Story of Mary Mildred Williams and the Abolition Movement (Hardcover)
Jessie Morgan-Owens
R517 R410 Discovery Miles 4 100 Save R107 (21%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

When a decades-long court battle resulted in her family's freedom in 1855, seven-year-old Mary Mildred Williams unexpectedly became the face of American slavery. Famous abolitionists Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry David Thoreau, and John Albion Andrew would help Mary and her family in freedom, but Senator Charles Sumner saw a monumental political opportunity. Due to generations of sexual violence, Mary's skin was so light that she "passed" as white, and this fact would make her the key to his white audience's sympathy. During his sold-out abolitionist lecture series, Sumner paraded Mary in front of rapt audiences as evidence that slavery was not bounded by race. Weaving together long-overlooked primary sources and arresting images, including the daguerreotype that turned Mary into the poster child of a movement, Jessie Morgan-Owens investigates tangled generations of sexual enslavement and the fraught politics that led Mary to Sumner. She follows Mary's story through the lives of her determined mother and grandmother to her own adulthood, parallel to the story of the antislavery movement and the eventual signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. Girl in Black and White restores Mary to her rightful place in history and uncovers a dramatic narrative of travels along the Underground Railroad, relationships tested by oppression, and the struggles of life after emancipation. The result is an expose of the thorny racial politics of the abolitionist movement and the pervasive colorism that dictated where white sympathy lay-one that sheds light on a shameful legacy that still affects us profoundly today.

In the Hurricane's Eye - The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown (Hardcover): Nathaniel Philbrick In the Hurricane's Eye - The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown (Hardcover)
Nathaniel Philbrick
R554 R437 Discovery Miles 4 370 Save R117 (21%) Shipped within 7 - 11 working days
Southern Rights - Political Prisoners and the Myth of Confederate Constitutionalism (Hardcover): Mark E Neely Southern Rights - Political Prisoners and the Myth of Confederate Constitutionalism (Hardcover)
Mark E Neely
R947 Discovery Miles 9 470 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

On the day Fort Sumter surrendered to Confederate authorities, General Braxton Bragg reacted to a newspaper report that might have revealed the position of gun emplacements by placing the correspondent, a Southern loyalist, under arrest. Thus the Confederate army's first detention of a citizen occurred before President Lincoln had even called out troops to suppress the rebellion. During the civil war that followed, not a day would pass when Confederate military prisons did not contain political prisoners.

Based on the discovery of records of over four thousand of these prisoners, Mark E. Neely Jr.'s new book undermines the common understanding that Jefferson Davis and the Confederates were scrupulous in their respect for constitutional rights while Lincoln and the Unionists regularly violated the rights of dissenters. Neely reveals for the first time the extent of repression of Unionists and other civilians in the Confederacy, and uncovers and marshals convincing evidence that Southerners were as ready as their Northern counterparts to give up civil liberties in response to the real or imagined threats of wartime.

From the onset of hostilities, the exploits of drunken recruits prompted communities from Selma to Lynchburg to beg the Richmond government to impose martial law. Southern citizens resigned themselves to a passport system for domestic travel similar to the system of passes imposed on enslaved and free blacks before the war. These restrictive measures made commerce difficult and constrained religious activity. As one Virginian complained, "This struggle was begun in defence of Constitutional Liberty which we could not get in the United States." The Davis administration countered that the passport system was essential to prevent desertion from the army, and most Southerners accepted the passports as a necessary inconvenience, ignoring the irony that the necessities of national mobilization had changed their government from a states'-rights confederacy to a powerful, centralized authority.

After the war the records of men imprisoned by this authority were lost through a combination of happenstance and deliberate obfuscation. Their discovery and subtle interpretation by a Pulitzer Prize&emdash;winning historian explodes one of the remaining myths of Lost Cause historiography, revealing Jefferson Davis as a calculated manipulator of the symbols of liberty.

Disorder in the Court - Trials and Sexual Conflict at the Turn of the Century (Hardcover): George Robb, Nancy Erber Disorder in the Court - Trials and Sexual Conflict at the Turn of the Century (Hardcover)
George Robb, Nancy Erber
R1,868 Discovery Miles 18 680 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

At the turn of the century, a spate of sensational trials kept French and English readers spellbound and ignited bitter tugs of war over marriage and divorce laws, women's rights, temperance, gay prostitution, and lesbian literature.

The chapters in Disorder in the Court each focus on a specific high-profile trial, and the public debates surrounding it, in order to address the role of the state in regulating sexual morality. The authors draw on police archives, records of coroners' inquests, magistrates' courts, and news coverage to bring to life social conflicts sparked by differing ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality. Also explored is the role of the police and 'scientific' methods of criminology in an era when working class marital conflicts were resolved by an axe blow, unwanted middle class spouses were dispatched with an arsenic diet, and government agents scanned sensational novels or loitered in Paris urinals in search of vice.

The Longest Afternoon - The 400 Men Who Decided the Battle of Waterloo (Paperback): Brendan Simms The Longest Afternoon - The 400 Men Who Decided the Battle of Waterloo (Paperback)
Brendan Simms 1
R183 R123 Discovery Miles 1 230 Save R60 (33%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

'A superb little book that is micro-history at its best' Washington Post 'The brevity of this remarkable book belies the amount of work that went into it. One can only marvel at how well Professor Simms has gone through the original sources - the surviving journals, reminiscences and letters of the individual combatants - to produce a coherent and gripping narrative' Nick Lezard, Guardian The true story, told minute by minute, of the soldiers who defeated Napoleon - from Brendan Simms, acclaimed author of Europe: The Struggle for Supremacy Europe had been at war for over twenty years. After a short respite in exile, Napoleon had returned to France and threatened another generation of fighting across the devastated and exhausted continent. At the small Belgian village of Waterloo two large, hastily mobilized armies faced each other to decide the future of Europe. Unknown either to Napoleon or Wellington the battle would be decided by a small, ordinary group of British and German troops given the task of defending the farmhouse of La Haye Sainte. This book tells their extraordinary story, brilliantly recapturing the fear, chaos and chanciness of battle and using previously untapped eye-witness reports. Through determination, cunning and fighting spirit, some four hundred soldiers held off many thousands of French and changed the course of history.

Feminizing Venereal Disease - The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century Medical Discourse (Paperback): Mary Spongberg Feminizing Venereal Disease - The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century Medical Discourse (Paperback)
Mary Spongberg
R568 Discovery Miles 5 680 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

"An interesting book for anyone who is interested in the history of venereal disease. It provides some interesting facts to consider about women and venereal disease and makes the reader aware that women have taken a bad rap for many centuries and that bad rap is slowly being transferred to the gays in this age of AIDS. Recommended for all academic and medical libraries."
"--AIDS Book Review Journal"

In 1497 the local council of a small town in Scotland issued an order that all light women--women suspected of prostitution-- be branded with a hot iron on their face. In late eighteenth- century England, the body of the prostitute became almost synonymous with venereal disease as doctors drew up detailed descriptions of the abnormal and degenerate traits of fallen women. Throughout much of history, popular and medical knowledge has held women, especially promiscuous women, as the source of venereal disease. In Feminizing Venereal Disease, Mary Spongberg provides a critical examination of this practice by examining the construction of venereal disease in 19th century Britain.

Spongberg argues that despite the efforts of doctors to treat medicine as a pure science, medical knowledge was greatly influenced by cultural assumptions and social and moral codes. By revealing the symbolic importance of the prostitute as the source of social disease in Victorian England, Spongberg presents a forceful argument about the gendering of nineteenth- century medicine. In a fascinating use of history to enlighten contemporary discourse, the book concludes with a compelling discussion of the impact of Victorian notions of the body on current discussions of HIV/AIDS, arguing that AIDS, likesyphilis in the nineteenth century, has become a feminized disease.

Japan's Castles - Citadels of Modernity in War and Peace (Hardcover): Oleg Benesch, Ran Zwigenberg Japan's Castles - Citadels of Modernity in War and Peace (Hardcover)
Oleg Benesch, Ran Zwigenberg
R2,010 R1,855 Discovery Miles 18 550 Save R155 (8%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

An innovative examination of heritage politics in Japan, showing how castles have been used to re-invent and recapture competing versions of the pre-imperial past and project possibilities for Japan's future. Oleg Benesch and Ran Zwigenberg argue that Japan's modern transformations can be traced through its castles. They examine how castle preservation and reconstruction campaigns served as symbolic ways to assert particular views of the past and were crucial in the making of an idealized premodern history. Castles have been used to craft identities, to create and erase memories, and to symbolically join tradition and modernity. Until 1945, they served as physical and symbolic links between the modern military and the nation's premodern martial heritage. After 1945, castles were cleansed of military elements and transformed into public cultural spaces that celebrated both modernity and the pre-imperial past. What were once signs of military power have become symbols of Japan's idealized peaceful past.

Lost Trails of the Cimarron (Paperback, 2nd ed.): Harry E. Chrisman Lost Trails of the Cimarron (Paperback, 2nd ed.)
Harry E. Chrisman
R507 Discovery Miles 5 070 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Lost Trails of the Cimarron is Harry Chrisman's folk history of nineteenth-century Cimarron country -- southwestern Kansas, southeastern Colorado, and the neutral strip Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle. Buffalo hunters entered the area in violation of the Medicine Lodge Treaty. The cowboys and settlers who followed formed a vast economy based on grass and beef, the beginnings of prominent cattle ranches such as the Westmoreland-Hitch Outfit.

Chrisman details the history of the outlaws and ruffians of "No Man's Land" trail drives to Dodge City and beyond. Numerous illustrations accompany the anecdotes and stories of various frontier personalities. A new foreword by Jim Hoy also appears in this edition.

The Victorians - Twelve Titans who Forged Britain (Hardcover): Jacob Rees-Mogg The Victorians - Twelve Titans who Forged Britain (Hardcover)
Jacob Rees-Mogg 1
R562 R351 Discovery Miles 3 510 Save R211 (38%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

They built a nation. Now it's our turn. Many associate the Victorian era with austere social attitudes and filthy factories. But in this bold and provocative book, Jacob Rees-Mogg -- leading Tory MP and prominent Brexit advocate -- takes up the story of twelve landmark figures to paint a very different picture of the age: one of bright ambition, bold self-belief and determined industriousness. Whether through Peel's commitment to building free trade, Palmerston's deft diplomacy in international affairs, or Pugin's uplifting architectural feats, the Victorians transformed the nation and established Britain as a preeminent global force. Now 200 years since the birth of Queen Victoria, it is essential that we remember the spirit, drive and values of the Victorians who forged modern Britain, as we consider our future as a nation.

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