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Books > Humanities > History > American history > 1800 to 1900

Marketing the Blue and Gray - Newspaper Advertising and the American Civil War (Hardcover): Lawrence A. Kreiser Jr Marketing the Blue and Gray - Newspaper Advertising and the American Civil War (Hardcover)
Lawrence A. Kreiser Jr
R1,084 Discovery Miles 10 840 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Lawrence A. Kreiser, Jr.'s Marketing the Blue and Gray analyzes newspaper advertising during the American Civil War. Newspapers circulated widely between 1861 and 1865, and merchants took full advantage of this readership. They marketed everything from war bonds to biographies of military and political leaders; from patent medicines that promised to cure almost any battlefield wound to ""secession cloaks"" and ""Fort Sumter"" cockades. Union and Confederate advertisers pitched shopping as its own form of patriotism, one of the more enduring legacies of the nation's largest and bloodiest war. However, unlike important-sounding headlines and editorials, advertisements have received only passing notice from historians. As the first full-length analysis of Union and Confederate newspaper advertising, Kreiser's study sheds light on this often overlooked aspect of Civil War media. Kreiser argues that the marketing strategies of the time show how commercialization and patriotism became increasingly intertwined as Union and Confederate war aims evolved. Yankees and Rebels believed that buying decisions were an important expression of their civic pride, from ""Union forever"" groceries to ""States Rights"" sewing machines. He suggests that the notices helped to expand American democracy by allowing their diverse readership to participate in almost every aspect of the Civil War. As potential customers, free blacks and white women perused announcements for war-themed biographies, images, and other material wares that helped to define the meaning of the fighting. Advertisements also helped readers to become more savvy consumers and, ultimately, citizens, by offering them choices. White men and, in the Union after 1863, black men might volunteer for military service after reading a recruitment notice; or they might instead respond to the kind of notice for ""draft insurance"" that flooded newspapers after the Union and Confederate governments resorted to conscription to help fill the ranks. Marketing the Blue and Gray demonstrates how, through their sometimes-messy choices, advertising pages offered readers the opportunity to participate- or not- in the war effort.

Ordeal of the Reunion - A New History of Reconstruction (Hardcover): Mark Wahlgren Summers Ordeal of the Reunion - A New History of Reconstruction (Hardcover)
Mark Wahlgren Summers
R954 R766 Discovery Miles 7 660 Save R188 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

For a generation, scholarship on the Reconstruction era has rightly focused on the struggles of the recently enslaved for a meaningful freedom and defined its success or failure largely in those terms. In The Ordeal of the Reunion, Mark Wahlgren Summers goes beyond this vitally important question, focusing on Reconstruction's need to form an enduring Union without sacrificing the framework of federalism and republican democracy. Assessing the era nationally, Summers emphasizes the variety of conservative strains that confined the scope of change, highlights the war's impact and its aftermath, and brings the West and foreign policy into an integrated narrative. In sum, this book offers a fresh explanation for Reconstruction's demise and a case for its essential successes as well as its great failures. Indeed, this book demonstrates the extent to which the victors' aims in 1865 were met--and at what cost. Summers depicts not just a heroic, tragic moment with equal rights advanced and then betrayed but a time of achievement and consolidation, in which nationhood and emancipation were placed beyond repeal and the groundwork was laid for a stronger, if not better, America to come.

Generals in Blue and Generals in Gray (Hardcover): Ezra J. Warner Generals in Blue and Generals in Gray (Hardcover)
Ezra J. Warner
R1,875 R1,485 Discovery Miles 14 850 Save R390 (21%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Unsurpassed since their publication fifty years ago, Ezra J. Warner s Genderals in Blue and Generals in Gray provide a complete guide to the military leadership of both the South and the North and remain the most exhaustive and celebrated work on the Civil War s generals. In commemoration of the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Warner s magnum opus is available, for the first time, as a hardcover boxed set of both volumes containing concise, detailed biographical sketches and photographs of all 425 Confederate and 583 Union generals. Through tireless research and captivating detail, Warner provides fascinating insight into these commanders, well known and obscure, from the legendary Union general George Custer to the youngest brigadier in the Confederate Army, William Paul Roberts, only nineteen years of age in 1861. Hailed by scholars and critics as one of the few indispensable books on the American Civil War, Warner s work offers the only comprehensive reference of the men who led over three million soldiers into the most divisive and bloodiest war in American history.

North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865: A Roster, Volume 19 - Miscellaneous Battalions and Companies (Hardcover): Matthew Brown,... North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865: A Roster, Volume 19 - Miscellaneous Battalions and Companies (Hardcover)
Matthew Brown, Michael Coffey
R1,278 Discovery Miles 12 780 Ships in 7 - 11 working days
The Civil War and the Transformation of American Citizenship (Hardcover): Paul D Quigley The Civil War and the Transformation of American Citizenship (Hardcover)
Paul D Quigley
R1,094 Discovery Miles 10 940 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The meanings and practices of American citizenship were as contested during the Civil War era as they are today. By examining a variety of perspectives, from prominent lawmakers in Washington, D.C., to enslaved women, from black firemen in southern cities to Confederate emigres in Latin America, The Civil War and the Transformation of American Citizenship offers a wide-ranging exploration of citizenship's metamorphoses amid the extended crises of war and emancipation. Americans in the antebellum era considered citizenship, at its most basic level, as a legal status acquired through birth or naturalization, and one that offered certain rights in exchange for specific obligations. Yet throughout the Civil War period, the boundaries and consequences of what it meant to be a citizen remained in flux. At the beginning of the war, Confederates relinquished their status as U.S. citizens, only to be mostly reabsorbed as full American citizens in its aftermath. The Reconstruction years also saw African American men acquire, at least in theory, the core rights of citizenship. As these changes swept across the nation, Americans debated the parameters of citizenship, the possibility of adopting or rejecting citizenship at will, and the relative importance of political privileges, economic opportunity, and cultural belonging. Ongoing inequities between races and genders, over the course of the Civil War and in the years that followed, further shaped these contentious debates. The Civil War and the Transformation of American Citizenship reveals how war, Emancipation, and Reconstruction forced the country to rethink the concept of citizenship not only in legal and constitutional terms but also within the context of the lives of everyday Americans, from imprisoned Confederates to former slaves.

The Gray Fox - George Crook and the Indian Wars (Paperback): Paul Magid The Gray Fox - George Crook and the Indian Wars (Paperback)
Paul Magid
R781 Discovery Miles 7 810 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

George Crook was one of the most prominent military figures of the late-nineteenth-century Indian Wars. Yet today his name is largely unrecognized despite the important role he played in such pivotal events in western history as the Custer fight at the Little Big Horn, the death of Crazy Horse, and the Geronimo campaigns. As Paul Magid portrays Crook in this highly readable second volume of a projected three-volume biography, the general was an innovative and eccentric soldier, with a complex and often contradictory personality, whose activities often generated intense controversy. Though known for his uncompromising ferocity in battle, he nevertheless respected his enemies and grew to know and feel compassion for them. Describing campaigns against the Paiutes, Apaches, Sioux, and Cheyennes, Magid's vivid narrative explores Crook's abilities as an Indian fighter. The Apaches, among the fiercest peoples in the West, called Crook the Gray Fox after an animal viewed in their culture as a herald of impending death. Generals Grant and Sherman both regarded him as indispensable to their efforts to subjugate the western tribes. Though noted for his aggressiveness in combat, Crook was a reticent officer who rarely raised his voice, habitually dressed in shabby civilian attire, and often rode a mule in the field. He was also self-confident to the point of arrogance, harbored fierce grudges, and because he marched to his own beat, got along poorly with his superiors. He had many enduring friendships both in- and outside the army, though he divulged little of his inner self to others and some of his closest comrades knew he could be cold and insensitive. As Magid relates these crucial episodes of Crook's life, a dominant contradiction emerges: while he was an unforgiving warrior in the field, he not infrequently risked his career to do battle with his military superiors and with politicians in Washington to obtain fair treatment for the very people against whom he fought. Upon hearing of the general's death in 1890, Chief Red Cloud spoke for his Sioux people: ""He, at least, never lied to us. His words gave the people hope.

The Diary of a Civil War Bride - Lucy Wood Butler of Virginia (Hardcover, Annotated edition): Kristen Brill The Diary of a Civil War Bride - Lucy Wood Butler of Virginia (Hardcover, Annotated edition)
Kristen Brill
R811 Discovery Miles 8 110 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Lucy Wood Butler's diary provides a compelling account of one woman's struggle to come to terms with the realities of war on the Confederate home front. Expertly annotated and introduced by Kristen Brill, The Diary of a Civil War Bride brings to light a vital archival resource that reveals Lucy Butler's intimate observations on the attitudes and living conditions of many white middle-class women in the Civil War South. The Diary of a Civil War Bride opens with a series of letters between Lucy Wood and her husband, Waddy Butler, a Confederate soldier whom Lucy met in 1859 while he was a student at the University of Virginia. Serving with the Second Florida Regiment, Butler died at the Battle of Chancellorsville. Lucy's diary spans much of the intervening years, from the spring of 1861 to the death of her husband in the summer of 1863. Through the dual prism of her personal marital union and the national disunion, the narrative delivers a detailed glimpse into the middle-class Confederate home front, as Butler comments on everyday conditions in Charlottesville, Virginia, as well as the greater sociopolitical valence of the Civil War. In addition to the details of Lucy's courtship, marriage, and widowhood, the diary provides a humanistic and sentimental lens through which readers can closely examine broader issues surrounding the institution of slavery, the politics of secession, and the erosion of Confederate nationalism. Numerous canonical studies of southern women draw on portions of Butler's letters and diary, which offer insight not only into women's history but into the politics, social pressures, and values of the Confederate South. Now available and unabridged for the first time in book form, The Diary of a Civil War Bride provides an ordinary woman's perspective on extraordinary events.

This Grand Experiment - When Women Entered the Federal Workforce in Civil War-Era Washington, D.C. (Hardcover): Jessica Ziparo This Grand Experiment - When Women Entered the Federal Workforce in Civil War-Era Washington, D.C. (Hardcover)
Jessica Ziparo
R947 Discovery Miles 9 470 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In the volatility of the Civil War, the federal government opened its payrolls to women. Although the press and government officials considered the federal employment of women to be an innocuous wartime aberration, women immediately saw the new development for what it was: a rare chance to obtain well-paid, intellectually challenging work in a country and time which typically excluded females from such channels of labor. Thousands of female applicants from across the country flooded Washington with applications. Here, Jessica Ziparo traces the struggles and triumphs of early female federal employees, who were caught between traditional, cultural notions of female dependence and an evolving movement of female autonomy in a new economic reality. In doing so, Ziparo demonstrates how these women challenged societal gender norms, carved out a place for independent women in the streets of Washington, and sometimes clashed with the female suffrage movement. Examining the advent of female federal employment, Ziparo finds a lost opportunity for wage equality in the federal government and shows how despite discrimination, prejudice, and harassment, women persisted, succeeding in making their presence in the federal workforce permanent.

The Gleam of Bayonets - The Battle of Antietam and Robert E. Lee's Maryland Campaign, September 1862 (Paperback, New... The Gleam of Bayonets - The Battle of Antietam and Robert E. Lee's Maryland Campaign, September 1862 (Paperback, New edition)
James V Murfin, James I. Robertson Jr, Scott Hartwig
R602 R499 Discovery Miles 4 990 Save R103 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

One of the bloodiest days in American military history, the Battle of Antietam turned the tide of the Civil War in favor of the North and delivered the first major defeat to Robert E. Lee's army. In The Gleam of Bayonets, James V. Murfin gives a compelling account of the events and personalities involved in this momentous battle. The gentleness and patience of Lincoln, the vacillations of McClellan, and the grandeur of Lee -- all unfold before the reader. The battle itself is presented with precision and scope as Murfin blends together atmosphere and fact, emotions and tactics, into a dramatic and coherent whole. Originally published in 1965, The Gleam of Bayonets is now recognized as a classic and the standard against which all books on Antietam are measured.

Phantom Pain - North Carolina's Artificial-Limbs Program for Confederate Veterans (Paperback): Ansley Herring Wegner Phantom Pain - North Carolina's Artificial-Limbs Program for Confederate Veterans (Paperback)
Ansley Herring Wegner
R326 R288 Discovery Miles 2 880 Save R38 (12%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
The Confederate Homefront - A History in Documents (Paperback): Wallace Hettle The Confederate Homefront - A History in Documents (Paperback)
Wallace Hettle
R700 Discovery Miles 7 000 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The study of Confederate troops, generals, and politicians during the Civil War often overshadows the history of noncombatants- slave and free, male and female, rich and poor- threatening obscurity for important voices of the period. Although civilians comprised the vast majority of those affected by the conflict, even the number of civilian casualties over the course of the Civil War remains unknown. Wallace Hettle's The Confederate Homefront provides a sample of the enormous documentary record on the domestic population of the Confederate states, offering a glimpse of what it was like to live through a brutal war fought almost entirely on southern soil. The Confederate Homefront collects excerpts from slave narratives, poems, diaries and journals, along with brief introductions that examine the circumstances and biases of each source. Bearing witness to the lives of marginalized groups, narratives by women navigating complex webs of loyalties and former slaves resisting and escaping the Confederacy feature prominently. Hettle also focuses on lesser-known aspects of the war, such as conscription, draft evasion, and the development of Union military policies that helped bring about the demise of slavery. Reflecting recent work by Civil War historians, Hettle includes numerous documents that focus on the role of Christianity in justifying the Confederacy's increasingly destructive moral and ideological position in the war. He also examines the guerrilla war on the southern homefront and the plight of black and white refugees, adding new insights into the destructive impact of warfare on the lives of civilians. The first documentary history to foreground the experiences of Confederate civilians, The Confederate Homefront illuminates the overlooked lives of noncombatants in the Civil War and bears witness to the traumatic final years of the institution of American slavery.

The Guerrilla Hunters - Irregular Conflicts during the Civil War (Hardcover): Brian D. McKnight, Barton A Myers, Adam Domby,... The Guerrilla Hunters - Irregular Conflicts during the Civil War (Hardcover)
Brian D. McKnight, Barton A Myers, Adam Domby, Andrew Fialka, Scott Thompson, …
R1,181 Discovery Miles 11 810 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Throughout the Civil War, irregular warfare, including the use of hit-and-run assaults, ambushes, and raiding tactics, thrived in localized guerrilla fights within the Border States and the Confederate South. The Guerrilla Hunters offers a comprehensive overview of the tactics, motives, and actors in these conflicts, from the Confederate-authorised Partisan Rangers, a military force directed to spy on, harass, and steal from Union forces, to men like John Gatewood, who deserted the Confederate army in favour of targeting Tennessee civilians believed to be in sympathy with the Union. With a foreword by Kenneth W. Noe and an afterword by Daniel E. Sutherland, this collection represents an impressive array of the foremost experts on guerrilla fighting in the Civil War. Providing new interpretations of this long-misconstrued aspect of warfare, these scholars go beyond the conventional battlefield to examine the stories of irregular combatants across all theaters of the Civil War, bringing geographic breadth to what is often treated as local and regional history. The Guerrilla Hunters shows that instances of unorthodox combat, once thought isolated and infrequent, were numerous, and many clashes defy easy categorisation. Novel methodological approaches and a staggering diversity of research and topics allow this volume to support multiple areas for debate and discovery within this growing field of Civil War scholarship.

Reconstruction in Alabama - From Civil War to Redemption in the Cotton South (Hardcover): Michael W. Fitzgerald Reconstruction in Alabama - From Civil War to Redemption in the Cotton South (Hardcover)
Michael W. Fitzgerald
R1,191 Discovery Miles 11 910 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The civil rights revolutions of the 1950s and 1960s transformed the literature on Reconstruction in America by emphasizing the social history of emancipation and the hopefulness that reunification would bring equality. Much of this revisionist work served to counter and correct the racist and pro-Confederate accounts of Reconstruction written in the early twentieth century. While there have been modern scholarly revisions of individual states, most are decades old, and Michael W. Fitzgerald's Reconstruction in Alabama is the first comprehensive reinterpretation of that state's history in over a century. Fitzgerald's work not only revises the existing troubling histories of the era, it also offers a compelling and innovative new look at the process of rebuilding Alabama following the war. Attending to an array of issues largely ignored until now, Fitzgerald's history begins by analyzing the differences over slavery, secession, and war that divided Alabama's whites, mostly along the lines of region and class. He examines the economic and political implications of defeat, focusing particularly on how freed slaves and their former masters mediated the postwar landscape. For a time, he suggests, whites and freedpeople coexisted mostly peaceably in some parts of the state under the Reconstruction government, as a recovering cotton economy bathed the plantation belt in profit. Later, when charting the rise and fall of the Republican Party, Fitzgerald shows that Alabama's new Republican government implemented an ambitious program of railroad subsidy, characterized by substantial corruption that eventually bankrupted the state and helped end Republican rule. He shows, however, that the state's freedpeople and their preferred leaders were not the major players in this arena: they had other issues that mattered to them far more, like public education, civil rights, voting rights, and resisting the Klan's terrorist violence. After Reconstruction ended, Fitzgerald suggests that white collective memory of the era fixated on black voting, big government, high taxes, and corruption, all of which buttressed the Jim Crow order in the state. This misguided understanding of the past encouraged Alabama's intransigence during the later civil rights era. Despite the power of faulty interpretations that united segregationists, Fitzgerald demonstrates that it was class and regional divisions over economic policy, as much as racial tension, that shaped the complex reality of Reconstruction in Alabama.

The Slaveholding Crisis - Fear of Insurrection and the Coming of the Civil War (Hardcover): Carl Lawrence Paulus The Slaveholding Crisis - Fear of Insurrection and the Coming of the Civil War (Hardcover)
Carl Lawrence Paulus
R1,163 Discovery Miles 11 630 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In December 1860, South Carolinians voted to abandon the Union, sparking the deadliest war in American history. Led by a proslavery movement that viewed Abraham Lincoln's place at the helm of the federal government as a real and present danger to the security of the South, southerners, both slaveholders and nonslaveholders, willingly risked civil war by seceding from the United States. Radical proslavery activists contended that without defending slavery's westward expansion American planters would, like their former counterparts in the West Indies, become greatly outnumbered by those they enslaved. The result would transform the South into a mere colony within the federal government and make white southerners reliant on antislavery outsiders for protection of their personal safety and wealth. Faith in American exceptionalism played an important role in the reasoning of the antebellum American public, shaping how those in both the free and slave states viewed the world. Questions about who might share the bounty of the exceptional nature of the country became the battleground over which Americans fought, first with words, then with guns. Carl Lawrence Paulus's The Slaveholding Crisis examines how, due to the fear of insurrection by the enslaved, southerners created their own version of American exceptionalism, one that placed the perpetuation of slavery at its forefront. Feeling a loss of power in the years before the Civil War, the planter elite no longer saw the Union, as a whole, fulfilling that vision of exceptionalism. As a result, Paulus contends, slaveholders and nonslaveholding southerners believed that the white South could anticipate racial conflict and brutal warfare. This narrative postulated that limiting slavery's expansion within the Union was a riskier proposition than fighting a war of secession. In the end, Paulus argues, by insisting that the new party in control of the federal government promoted this very insurrection, the planter elite gained enough popular support to create the Confederate States of America. In doing so, they established a thoroughly proslavery, modern state with the military capability to quell massive resistance by the enslaved, expand its territorial borders, and war against the forces of the Atlantic antislavery movement.

Sex and the Civil War - Soldiers, Pornography, and the Making of American Morality (Hardcover): Judith Giesberg Sex and the Civil War - Soldiers, Pornography, and the Making of American Morality (Hardcover)
Judith Giesberg
R804 Discovery Miles 8 040 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Civil War soldiers enjoyed unprecedented access to obscene materials of all sorts, including mass-produced erotic fiction, cartes de visite, playing cards, and stereographs. A perfect storm of antebellum legal, technological, and commercial developments, coupled with the concentration of men fed into armies, created a demand for, and a deluge of, pornography in the military camps. Illicit materials entered in haversacks, through the mail, or from sutlers; soldiers found pornography discarded on the ground, and civilians discovered it in abandoned camps. Though few examples survived the war, these materials raised sharp concerns among reformers and lawmakers, who launched campaigns to combat it. By the war's end, a victorious, resurgent American nation-state sought to assert its moral authority by redefining human relations of the most intimate sort, including the regulation of sex and reproduction-most evident in the Comstock laws, a federal law and a series of state measures outlawing pornography, contraception, and abortion. With this book, Judith Giesberg has written the first serious study of the erotica and pornography that nineteenth-century American soldiers read and shared and links them to the postwar reaction to pornography and to debates about the future of sex and marriage.

War upon Our Border - Two Ohio Valley Communities Navigate the Civil War (Hardcover): Stephen I Rockenbach War upon Our Border - Two Ohio Valley Communities Navigate the Civil War (Hardcover)
Stephen I Rockenbach
R1,145 Discovery Miles 11 450 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

War upon Our Border examines the experiences of two Ohio River Valley communities during the turmoil and social upheaval of the American Civil War. Although on opposite sides of the border between slavery and freedom, Corydon, Indiana, and Frankfort, Kentucky, shared a legacy of white settlement and a distinct western identity, which fostered unity and emphasized cooperation during the first year of the war. But subsequent guerrilla raids, military occupation, economic hardship, political turmoil, and racial tension ultimately divided citizens living on either side of the river border. Once a conduit for all kinds of relationships, the Ohio River became a barrier dividing North and South by the end of the conflict. Centered on the experience of local politicians, civic leaders, laborers, soldiers, and civilians, this combined social and military history addresses major interpretative debates, including how citizens chose allegiances, what role slavery played in soldier and civilian motivation, and the nature of life on the home front. Examining manuscripts, newspapers, and government documents, War upon Our Border employs a microhistorical approach to link the experiences of common people with the sweeping national events of the Civil War era. The resulting study reveals the lingering effect of the war's memory and how the effort to construct a new regional dynamic continues to shape popular conceptions of the period.

Albert C. Ellithorpe, the First Indian Home Guards, and the Civil War on the Trans-Mississippi Frontier (Hardcover): M. Jane... Albert C. Ellithorpe, the First Indian Home Guards, and the Civil War on the Trans-Mississippi Frontier (Hardcover)
M. Jane Johansson
R1,050 Discovery Miles 10 500 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The Civil War experiences of Albert C. Ellithorpe, a Caucasian Union Army officer commanding the tri-racial First Indian Home Guards, illuminate remarkable and understudied facets of campaigning west of the Mississippi River. Major Ellithorpe's unit- comprised primarily of refugee Muscogee Creek and Seminole Indians and African Americans who served as interpreters- fought principally in Arkansas and Indian Territory, isolated from the larger currents of the Civil War. Using Ellithorpe's journal and his series of Chicago Evening Journal articles as her main sources, M. Jane Johansson unravels this exceptional account, providing one of the fullest examinations available on a mixed-race Union regiment serving in the border region of the West. Ellithorpe's insightful observations on Indians and civilians as well as the war in the trans-Mississippi theater provide a rare glimpse into a largely forgotten aspect of the conflict. He wrote extensively about the role of Indian troops, who served primarily as scouts and skirmishers, and on the nature of guerrilla warfare in the West. Ellithorpe also exposed internal problems in his regiment; some of his most dramatic entries concern his own charges against Caucasian officers, one of whom allegedly stole money from the unit's African American interpreters. Compiled here for the first time, Ellithorpe's commentary on the war adds a new chapter to our understanding of America's most complicated and tragic conflict.

Mobile Under Siege - Surviving the Union Blockade (Paperback): Paula Lenor Webb Mobile Under Siege - Surviving the Union Blockade (Paperback)
Paula Lenor Webb
R472 R390 Discovery Miles 3 900 Save R82 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Occupied Vicksburg (Hardcover): Bradley R Clampitt Occupied Vicksburg (Hardcover)
Bradley R Clampitt
R1,124 Discovery Miles 11 240 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

During the Civil War, Vicksburg, Mississippi, assumed almost mythic importance in the minds of Americans: northerners and southerners, soldier and civilian. The city occupied a strategic and commanding position atop rocky cliffs above the Mississippi River, from which it controlled the great waterway. As a result, Federal forces expended enormous effort, expense, and troops in many attempts to capture Vicksburg. The immense struggle for this southern bastion ultimately heightened its importance beyond its physical and strategic value. Its psychological significance elevated the town's status to one of the war's most important locations. Vicksburg's defiance dismayed northerners and delighted Confederates, who saw command of the river as a badge of honor. Finally, after a six-week siege that involved intense military and civilian suffering amid heavy artillery bombardment, Union forces captured the ""Gibraltar of the Confederacy,"" ending the bloody campaign. While many historians have told the story of the fall of Vicksburg, Bradley R. Clampitt is the first to offer a comprehensive examination of life there after its capture by the United States military. In the war-ravaged town, indiscriminate hardships befell soldiers and civilians alike during the last two years of the conflict and immediately after its end. In Occupied Vicksburg, Clampitt shows that following the Confederate withdrawal, Federal forces confronted myriad challenges in the city including filth, disease, and a never-ending stream of black and white refugees. Union leaders also responded to the pressures of newly free people and persistent guerrilla violence in the surrounding countryside. Detailing the trials of blacks, whites, northerners, and southerners, Occupied Vicksburg stands as a significant contribution to Civil War studies, adding to our understanding of military events and the home front. Clampitt's astute research provides insight into the very nature of the war and enhances existing scholarship on the experiences of common people during America's most cataclysmic event.

Gathering to Save a Nation - Lincoln and the Union's War Governors (Hardcover): Stephen D. Engle Gathering to Save a Nation - Lincoln and the Union's War Governors (Hardcover)
Stephen D. Engle
R1,263 Discovery Miles 12 630 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In this rich study of Union governors and their role in the Civil War,Stephen D. Engle examines how these politicians were pivotal in securingvictory. In a time of limited federal authority, governors were an essentialpart of the machine that maintained the Union while it mobilised and sustainedthe war effort. Charged with the difficult task of raising soldiers fromtheir home states, these governors had to also rally political, economic, andpopular support for the conflict, at times against a backdrop of significantlocal opposition. Engle argues that the relationship between these loyal-state leadersand Lincoln's administration was far more collaborative than previouslythought. While providing detailed and engaging portraits of these men, theirstate-level actions, and their collective cooperation, Engle brings into newfocus the era's complex political history and shows how the Civil War testedand transformed the relationship between state and federal governments.

The Battlefields of the Civil War (Paperback, New edition): William C Davis The Battlefields of the Civil War (Paperback, New edition)
William C Davis
R790 R665 Discovery Miles 6 650 Save R125 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

"The Battlefields of the Civil War" tells the stories of thirteen of the most important battles, including First Manassas, Shiloh, Antietam, Vicksburg, Gettysburg, and the Wilderness.

William C. Davis not only describes the events and outcomes of those great engagements, but also delves into the characters of the army commanders, revealing in many cases just how much their personalities influenced the actions of their subordinates - and ultimately the outcome of the battles themselves. Rounding out the narrative are 35 full-page color photograph spreads of Civil War artifacts (including flags, uniforms, artillery projectiles, and arms), 28 color paintings of soldiers in various regiment uniforms, and 166 historical photographs.

Sherman's March through North Carolina - A Chronology (Paperback): Wilson Angley, Jerry L. Cross, Michael Hill Sherman's March through North Carolina - A Chronology (Paperback)
Wilson Angley, Jerry L. Cross, Michael Hill
R281 R239 Discovery Miles 2 390 Save R42 (15%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Civil War Virginia - Battleground for a Nation (Paperback, New edition): James I. Robertson Civil War Virginia - Battleground for a Nation (Paperback, New edition)
James I. Robertson
R316 R266 Discovery Miles 2 660 Save R50 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Manassas, Hampton Roads, Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, Brandy Station, Spotsylvania, New Market, Cedar Creek, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Appomattox Courthouse are names that remain synonymous with valour, sacrifice and finally, defeat during the Civil War. These sites comprise but a handful of the more than 200 military engagements that took place in Virginia, the largest and richest of the Southern states. Nowhere in the nation was the full fury of the Civil War felt as it was in Virginia which saw the death, wounding and capture of over half a million men and the end of institutions that had helped perpetuate an outmoded economic system which had enslaved millions. Noted Civil War historian, James I. Robertson Jr, presents an overview of the pivotal state, caught in the midst of the most traumatic of national events.

There Is a North - Fugitive Slaves, Political Crisis, and Cultural Transformation in the Coming of the Civil War (Paperback):... There Is a North - Fugitive Slaves, Political Crisis, and Cultural Transformation in the Coming of the Civil War (Paperback)
John L. Brooke
R605 R522 Discovery Miles 5 220 Save R83 (14%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

How does political change take hold? In the 1850s, politicians and abolitionists despaired, complaining that the "North, the poor timid, mercenary, driveling North" offered no forceful opposition to the power of the slaveholding South. And yet, as John L. Brooke proves, the North did change. Inspired by brave fugitives who escaped slavery and the cultural craze that was Uncle Tom's Cabin, the North rose up to battle slavery, ultimately waging the bloody Civil War.While Lincoln's alleged quip about the little woman who started the big war has been oft-repeated, scholars have not fully explained the dynamics between politics and culture in the decades leading up to 1861. Rather than simply viewing the events of the 1850s through the lens of party politics, "There Is a North" is the first book to explore how cultural action -- including minstrelsy, theater, and popular literature -- transformed public opinion and political structures. Taking the North's rallying cry as his Title, Brooke shows how the course of history was forever changed.

The Fire of Freedom - Abraham Galloway and the Slaves' Civil War (Paperback): David S. Cecelski The Fire of Freedom - Abraham Galloway and the Slaves' Civil War (Paperback)
David S. Cecelski
R729 Discovery Miles 7 290 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Abraham H. Galloway (1837-1870) was a fiery young slave rebel, radical abolitionist, and Union spy who rose out of bondage to become one of the most significant and stirring black leaders in the South during the Civil War. Throughout his brief, mercurial life, Galloway fought against slavery and injustice. He risked his life behind enemy lines, recruited black soldiers for the North, and fought racism in the Union army's ranks. He also stood at the forefront of an African American political movement that flourished in the Union-occupied parts of North Carolina, even leading a historic delegation of black southerners to the White House to meet with President Lincoln and to demand the full rights of citizenship. He later became one of the first black men elected to the North Carolina legislature. Long hidden from history, Galloway's story reveals a war unfamiliar to most of us. As David Cecelski writes, ""Galloway's Civil War was a slave insurgency, a war of liberation that was the culmination of generations of perseverance and faith."" This riveting portrait illuminates Galloway's life and deepens our insight into the Civil War and Reconstruction as experienced by African Americans in the South.

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