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Books > Arts & Architecture > History of art / art & design styles > Art styles not limited by date > Art of indigenous peoples

American Indian Pottery (Paperback): Sharon Wirt American Indian Pottery (Paperback)
Sharon Wirt
R223 R151 Discovery Miles 1 510 Save R72 (32%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

This is a brief analysis of Indian Pottery, based on a museum exhibit prepared by the author.

Art for an Undivided Earth - The American Indian Movement Generation (Hardcover): Jessica L. Horton Art for an Undivided Earth - The American Indian Movement Generation (Hardcover)
Jessica L. Horton
R2,104 Discovery Miles 21 040 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In Art for an Undivided Earth Jessica L. Horton reveals how the spatial philosophies underlying the American Indian Movement (AIM) were refigured by a generation of artists searching for new places to stand. Upending the assumption that Jimmie Durham, James Luna, Kay WalkingStick, Robert Houle, and others were primarily concerned with identity politics, she joins them in remapping the coordinates of a widely shared yet deeply contested modernity that is defined in great part by the colonization of the Americas. She follows their installations, performances, and paintings across the ocean and back in time, as they retrace the paths of Native diplomats, scholars, performers, and objects in Europe after 1492. Along the way, Horton intervenes in a range of theories about global modernisms, Native American sovereignty, racial difference, archival logic, artistic itinerancy, and new materialisms. Writing in creative dialogue with contemporary artists, she builds a picture of a spatially, temporally, and materially interconnected world-an undivided earth.

African Art in the Barnes Foundation - The Triumph of L'Art Negre and the Harlem Renaissance (Hardcover): Christa Clarke African Art in the Barnes Foundation - The Triumph of L'Art Negre and the Harlem Renaissance (Hardcover)
Christa Clarke
R1,629 R968 Discovery Miles 9 680 Save R661 (41%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The first publication of the Barnes Foundation's important and extensive African art collection. The Barnes Foundation is renowned for its astonishing collection of Postimpressionist and early Modern art assembled by Albert C. Barnes, a Philadelphia pharmaceutical entrepreneur. Less known is the pioneering collection of African sculpture that Barnes acquired between 1922 and 1924, mainly from Paul Guillaume, the Paris-based dealer. The Barnes Foundation was one of the first permanent installations in the United States to present objects from Africa as fine art. Indeed, the African collection is central to understanding Barnes's socially progressive vision for his foundation. This comprehensive volume showcases all 123 objects, including reliquary figures, masks, and utensils, most of which originated in France's African colonies-Mali, Cote d'Ivoire, Gabon, and the Congo-as well as in Sierra Leone, Republic of Benin, and Nigeria. Christa Clarke considers the significance of the collection and Barnes's role in the Harlem Renaissance and in fostering broader appreciation of African art in the twentieth century. In-depth catalogue entries by noted scholars in the field complete the volume.

On the Lips of Others - Moteuczoma's Fame in Aztec Monuments and Rituals (Paperback): Patrick Thomas Hajovsky On the Lips of Others - Moteuczoma's Fame in Aztec Monuments and Rituals (Paperback)
Patrick Thomas Hajovsky
R903 R757 Discovery Miles 7 570 Save R146 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Moteuczoma, the last king who ruled the Aztec Empire, was rarely seen or heard by his subjects, yet his presence was felt throughout the capital city of Tenochtitlan, where his deeds were recorded in hieroglyphic inscriptions on monuments and his command was expressed in highly refined ritual performances. What did Moteuczoma's "fame" mean in the Aztec world? How was it created and maintained? In this innovative study, Patrick Hajovsky investigates the king's inscribed and spoken name, showing how it distinguished his aura from those of his constituencies, especially other Aztec nobles, warriors, and merchants, who also vied for their own grandeur and fame. While Tenochtitlan reached its greatest size and complexity under Moteuczoma, the "Great Speaker" innovated upon fame by tying his very name to the Aztec royal office. As Moteuczoma's fame transcends Aztec visual and oral culture, Hajovsky brings together a vast body of evidence, including Nahuatl language and poetry, indigenous pictorial manuscripts and written narratives, and archaeological and sculptural artifacts. The kaleidoscopic assortment of sources casts Moteuczoma as a divine king who, while inheriting the fame of past rulers, saw his own reputation become entwined with imperial politics, ideological narratives, and eternal gods. Hajovsky also reflects on posthumous narratives about Moteuczoma, which created a very different sense of his fame as a conquered subject. These contrasting aspects of fame offer important new insights into the politics of personhood and portraiture across Aztec and colonial-period sources.

Naga Textiles - Design, Technique, Meaning and Effect of a Local Craft Tradition in Northeast India (Hardcover): Marion... Naga Textiles - Design, Technique, Meaning and Effect of a Local Craft Tradition in Northeast India (Hardcover)
Marion Wettstein
R1,384 R1,032 Discovery Miles 10 320 Save R352 (25%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The focus of this comprehensive work is the aesthetics and the decryption of the language of the textiles of the Nagas, a group of tribal local cultures in the north-east of India and the north-west of Burma. For more than ten years, anthropologist Marion Wettstein has systematically been drawing the traditional fabrics, and researching their design, production techniques, meaning and contemporary transposition into fashion. More than 60 colour pencil drawings and 180 watercolours on the morphology of the textile samples are considered by the author to be not just an artistic translation but in particular visual argumentation. While the work shows how the textile patterns are laden with meaning of a complex system of status and social structure, it also illuminates what is understood by these concepts in the context of the Nagas and to what extent they are also constructs of colonial and scientific intervention.

Dynasty and Divinity - Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria (Paperback): Henry John Drewal, Enid Schildkrout Dynasty and Divinity - Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria (Paperback)
Henry John Drewal, Enid Schildkrout
R784 R665 Discovery Miles 6 650 Save R119 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Dynast and Divinity presents a major part of the extraordinary corpus of ancient Ife art in terra-cotta, stone, and metal, dating from the ninth to the fifteenth centuries. Artists at Ife, the ancient city-state of the Yoruba people of West Africa (located in present-day southwestern Nigeria), created sculpture that ranks among the most aesthetically striking and technically sophisticated in the world. Dynasty and Divinity reveals the extraordinarily creative range of Ife art through a diversity of objects that includes handsome idealized portrait heads, exquisite miniatures, expressive caricatures of old age, lively animals, and sculptures showing the impressive regalia worn by Ife's kings and queens. Together, these illuminate one of the world's greatest art centers and demonstrate the technological sophistication of Ife artists, as well as the rich aesthetic language they developed in order to convey ideas about worldly and divine power.--The refined sculptures from Ife demonstrate the dignity and self-assurance associated with the idea of dynasty, as well as the results of misfortunes and violence that could befall human beings--both fates shaped by divine as well as human interventions. Among the many masterpieces from Ife art in this book are a group of life-size copper portrait heads, carved stone animals, and the spectacular seated male figure found in the town of Tada, Nigeria, shown dressed in an elaborate textile. All of the objects come from the collection of the Nigerian National Commission for Museums and Monuments.--Henry John Drewal, a noted scholar of Yoruba and African diaspora arts, explores the significance of Ife's stone, terra-cotta, and metal sculptures in the context of Yoruba history and culture. Today, the city of Ife is still a spiritual heartland for the 29 million Yoruba people living in Nigeria and countless descendants in the Americas and elsewhere in the world. Drewal explores the purposes for which this art may have been made and its relationship to Yoruba ideas about leadership, divinity, gender, and aesthetics. In an introductory essay, Enid Schildkrout, an anthropologist who has curated major exhibitions on Africa, shows how this first assemblage of the full range of Ife art gives the most complete portrayal of an ancient African city ever presented in a single exhibition.--Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria accompanies an exhibition co-organized by the Museum for African Art, New York City, and the Fundacion Marcelino Botin, Santander, Spain, in collaboration with the National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria. The exhibition will appear at the British Museum, London, as Kingdom of Ife: Sculptures of West Africa.

Art for a Modern India, 1947-1980 (Paperback): Rebecca M. Brown Art for a Modern India, 1947-1980 (Paperback)
Rebecca M. Brown
R486 R421 Discovery Miles 4 210 Save R65 (13%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Following India's independence in 1947, Indian artists creating modern works of art sought to maintain a local idiom, an "Indianness" representative of their newly independent nation, while connecting to modernism, an aesthetic then understood as both universal and presumptively Western. These artists depicted India's precolonial past while embracing aspects of modernism's pursuit of the new, and they challenged the West's dismissal of non-Western places and cultures as sources of primitivist imagery but not of modernist artworks. In "Art for a Modern India," Rebecca M. Brown explores the emergence of a self-conscious Indian modernism--in painting, drawing, sculpture, architecture, film, and photography--in the years between independence and 1980, by which time the Indian art scene had changed significantly and postcolonial discourse had begun to complicate mid-century ideas of nationalism.

Through close analyses of specific objects of art and design, Brown describes how Indian artists engaged with questions of authenticity, iconicity, narrative, urbanization, and science and technology. She explains how the filmmaker Satyajit Ray presented the rural Indian village as a socially complex space rather than as the idealized site of "authentic India" in his acclaimed "Apu Trilogy," how the painter Bhupen Khakhar reworked Indian folk idioms and borrowed iconic images from calendar prints in his paintings of urban dwellers, and how Indian architects developed a revivalist style of bold architectural gestures anchored in India's past as they planned the Ashok Hotel and the Vigyan Bhavan Conference Center, both in New Delhi. Discussing these and other works of art and design, Brown chronicles the mid-twentieth-century trajectory of India's modern visual culture.

Grass Roots - African Origins of an American Art (Paperback): Dale Rosengarten, Theodore Rosengarten, Enid Schildkrout Grass Roots - African Origins of an American Art (Paperback)
Dale Rosengarten, Theodore Rosengarten, Enid Schildkrout
R699 R604 Discovery Miles 6 040 Save R95 (14%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Through the prism of America's most enduring African-inspired art form, the Lowcountry basket, Grass Roots guides readers across 300 years of American and African history. In scholarly essays and beautiful photographs, Grass Roots follows the coiled basket along its transformation on two continents from a simple farm tool once used for processing grain to a work of art and a central symbol of African and African American identity. Featuring images of the stunning work of contemporary basket makers from South Carolina to South Africa, as well as historic photographs that document the artistic heritage of the southern United States, Grass Roots appears at a moment when public recognition of the Gullah/Geechee heritage is encouraging a reexamination of Africa's contribution to American civilization. Working with basket makers from Charleston and Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, historian Dale Rosengarten has been studying African-American baskets for over 20 years and brings her research up-to-date with interviews of artists and the results of recent historical inquiry. Anthropologist Enid Schildkrout draws on her research in West Africa and museum collections around the world to explore the African antecedents of Lowcountry basketry. Geographer Judith A. Carney discusses the origins of rice in Africa and reveals how enslaved Africans brought to America not only rice seeds but, just as important, the technical know-how that turned southern coastal forests and swamps into incredibly profitable rice plantations. Historian Peter H. Wood discusses the many skills that enslaved Africans contributed to the settlement of the Old South and at the same time used to resist the conditions of their servitude. John Michael Vlach, a leading authority on African American folk art, discusses the history of visual depictions of plantation life. Fath Davis Ruffins, a specialist on the imagery of popular culture, sheds light on the history embedded in old photographs of African Americans in the Charleston area. Cultural historian Jessica B. Harris explores the tradition of rice in American cooking and the enduring African influences in the southern kitchen. Anthropologist and art historian Sandra Klopper sketches the history of coiled basketry in South Africa, illuminating its evolution from utilitarian craft to fine art, parallel to developments in America. Anthropologist J. Lorand Matory traces the changing meanings of Gullah/Geechee identity and discusses its appearance as a significant force on the American cultural scene today. Dale Rosengarten is curator of special collections at the College of Charleston library. Theodore Rosengarten teaches history at the College of Charlestona and University of South Carolina. Enid Schildkrout is chief curator and director of exhibitions and publications at the Museum for African Art, New York.

Art and Risk in Ancient Yoruba - Ife History, Power, and Identity, c. 1300 (Paperback): Suzanne Preston Blier Art and Risk in Ancient Yoruba - Ife History, Power, and Identity, c. 1300 (Paperback)
Suzanne Preston Blier
R858 Discovery Miles 8 580 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

In this book, Suzanne Preston Blier examines the intersection of art, risk and creativity in early African arts from the Yoruba center of Ife and the striking ways that ancient Ife artworks inform society, politics, history and religion. Yoruba art offers a unique lens into one of Africa's most important and least understood early civilizations, one whose historic arts have long been of interest to local residents and Westerners alike because of their tour-de-force visual power and technical complexity. Among the complementary subjects explored are questions of art making, art viewing and aesthetics in the famed ancient Nigerian city-state, as well as the attendant risks and danger assumed by artists, patrons and viewers alike in certain forms of subject matter and modes of portrayal, including unique genres of body marking, portraiture, animal symbolism and regalia. This volume celebrates art, history and the shared passion and skill with which the remarkable artists of early Ife sought to define their past for generations of viewers.

The Writing on the Wall - The Work of Joane Cardinal-Schubert (Paperback): Lindsey V Sharman The Writing on the Wall - The Work of Joane Cardinal-Schubert (Paperback)
Lindsey V Sharman; Contributions by Mike Schubert, Monique Westra, Alisdair Macrae, Tanya Harnett, …
R922 Discovery Miles 9 220 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Artist. Activist. Curator. Joane Cardinal-Schubert was a phenomenal talent. Her work recognizes the social and political ramifications of lived Indigenous experience, exposing truths about history, culture, and the contemporary world. She was a teacher and mentor, supporting those who struggle against the legacies of colonial history. She was an activist for Indigenous sovereignty, advocating for voices that go unheard. Despite significant personal and professional successes and monumental contributions to the Calgary artistic community, Cardinal-Shubert remains under-recognized by a broad audience. This richly illustrated, intensely personal book celebrates her story with intimacy and insight Combining personal recollection with art history, academic reading with anecdote and story, The Writing on the Wall is a crucial contribution to Indigenous and Canadian art history. Cardinal-Shubert's work leads the conversation, embracing the places where the personal, the political, and the artistic meet.

The Burden of the Ancients - Maya Ceremonies of World Renewal from the Pre-columbian Period to the Present (Paperback): Allen... The Burden of the Ancients - Maya Ceremonies of World Renewal from the Pre-columbian Period to the Present (Paperback)
Allen J. Christenson
R586 R504 Discovery Miles 5 040 Save R82 (14%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

In Maya theology, everything from humans and crops to gods and the world itself passes through endless cycles of birth, maturation, dissolution, death, and rebirth. Traditional Maya believe that human beings perpetuate this cycle through ritual offerings and ceremonies that have the power to rebirth the world at critical points during the calendar year. The most elaborate ceremonies take place during Semana Santa (Holy Week), the days preceding Easter on the Christian calendar, during which traditionalist Maya replicate many of the most important world-renewing rituals that their ancient ancestors practiced at the end of the calendar year in anticipation of the New Year's rites. Marshaling a wealth of evidence from Pre-Columbian texts, early colonial Spanish writings, and decades of fieldwork with present-day Maya, The Burden of the Ancients presents a masterfully detailed account of world-renewing ceremonies that spans the Pre-Columbian era through the crisis of the Conquest period and the subsequent colonial occupation all the way to the present. Allen J. Christenson focuses on Santiago Atitlan, a Tz'utujil Maya community in highland Guatemala, and offers the first systematic analysis of how the Maya preserved important elements of their ancient world renewal ceremonies by adopting similar elements of Roman Catholic observances and infusing them with traditional Maya meanings. His extensive description of Holy Week in Santiago Atitlan demonstrates that the community's contemporary ritual practices and mythic stories bear a remarkable resemblance to similar cultural entities from its Pre-Columbian past.

The Murals of Cacaxtla - The Power of Painting in Ancient Central Mexico (Hardcover): Claudia Brittenham The Murals of Cacaxtla - The Power of Painting in Ancient Central Mexico (Hardcover)
Claudia Brittenham; Foreword by Maria Teresa Uriarte
R1,403 R1,166 Discovery Miles 11 660 Save R237 (17%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Honorable Mention, ALAA Book Award, Association for Latin American Art/Arvey Foundation, 2016 Between AD 650 and 950, artists at the small Central Mexican city-state of Cacaxtla covered the walls of their most important sacred and public spaces with dazzling murals of gods, historical figures, and supernatural creatures. Testimonies of a richly interconnected ancient world, the Cacaxtla paintings present an unexpectedly deep knowledge of the art and religion of the Maya, Zapotec, and other distant Mesoamerican peoples. Painted during a period of war and shifting alliances after the fall of Teotihuacan, the murals' distinctive fusion of cosmopolitan styles and subjects claimed a powerful identity for the beleaguered city-state. Presenting the first cohesive, art historical study of the entire painting corpus, The Murals of Cacaxtla demonstrates that these magnificent works of art constitute a sustained and local painting tradition, treasured by generations of patrons and painters. Exhaustive chapters on each of the mural programs make it possible to see how the Cacaxtla painting tradition developed over time, responding to political and artistic challenges. Lavishly illustrated, The Murals of Cacaxtla illuminates the agency of ancient artists and the dynamics of artistic synthesis in a Mesoamerican context, offering a valuable counterpoint to studies of colonial and modern art operating at the intersection of cultural traditions.

Remembering the Future - Warlpiri Life Through the Prism of Drawing (Paperback): Melinda Hinkson Remembering the Future - Warlpiri Life Through the Prism of Drawing (Paperback)
Melinda Hinkson
R888 R696 Discovery Miles 6 960 Save R192 (22%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days
Lightning Warrior - Maya Art and Kingship at Quirigua (Paperback): Matthew George Looper Lightning Warrior - Maya Art and Kingship at Quirigua (Paperback)
Matthew George Looper
R795 R676 Discovery Miles 6 760 Save R119 (15%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

The ancient Maya city of Quirigua occupied a crossroads between Copan in the southeastern Maya highlands and the major centers of the Peten heartland. Though always a relatively small city, Quirigua stands out because of its public monuments, which were some of the greatest achievements of Classic Maya civilization. Impressive not only for their colossal size, high sculptural quality, and eloquent hieroglyphic texts, the sculptures of Quirigua are also one of the few complete, in situ series of Maya monuments anywhere, which makes them a crucial source of information about ancient Maya spirituality and political practice within a specific historical context.

Using epigraphic, iconographic, and stylistic analyses, this study explores the integrated political-religious meanings of Quirigua's monumental sculptures during the eighth-century A.D. reign of the city's most famous ruler, K'ak' Tiliw. In particular, Matthew Looper focuses on the role of stelae and other sculpture in representing the persona of the ruler not only as a political authority but also as a manifestation of various supernatural entities with whom he was associated through ritual performance. By tracing this sculptural program from its Early Classic beginnings through the reigns of K'ak' Tiliw and his successors, and also by linking it to practices at Copan, Looper offers important new insights into the politico-religious history of Quirigua and its ties to other Classic Maya centers, the role of kingship in Maya society, and the development of Maya art.

World Art - An Introduction to the Art in Artefacts (Paperback, New): Ben Burt World Art - An Introduction to the Art in Artefacts (Paperback, New)
Ben Burt
R848 Discovery Miles 8 480 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

What do we mean by 'art'? As a category of objects, the concept belongs to a Western cultural tradition, originally European and now increasingly global, but how useful is it for understanding other traditions? To understand art as a universal human value, we need to look at how the concept was constructed in order to reconstruct it through an understanding of the wider world. Western art values have a pervasive influence upon non-Western cultures and upon Western attitudes to them. This innovative yet accessible new text explores the ways theories of art developed as Western knowledge of the world expanded through exploration and trade, conquest, colonisation and research into other cultures, present and past. It considers the issues arising from the historical relationships which brought diverse artistic traditions together under the influence of Western art values, looking at how art has been used by colonisers and colonised in the causes of collecting and commerce, cultural hegemony and autonomous identities. World Art questions conventional Western assumptions of art from an anthropological perspective which allows comparison between cultures. It treats art as a property of artefacts rather than a category of objects, reclaiming the idea of 'world art' from the 'art world'. This book is essential reading for all students on anthropology of art courses as well as students of museum studies and art history, based on a wide range of case studies and supported by learning features such as annotated further reading and chapter opening summaries.

We Are Here - The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship 2011 (Paperback): Jennifer Complo McNutt, Ashley Holland We Are Here - The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship 2011 (Paperback)
Jennifer Complo McNutt, Ashley Holland
R555 R478 Discovery Miles 4 780 Save R77 (14%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

We Are Here boldly exemplifies Native American contemporary art as important, relevant, and deserving of a place in the contemporary art cannon. The five Eiteljorg Fellowship artists honored in this volume are among the Native artists creating some of the richest and most alarming art in the world. Powerful stories infused with Native history and experiences are expressed in glass, photography, performance art, and other media. Alan Michelson's (Mohawk) glass depictions of buried history are elegant and haunting. Bonnie Devine's (Ojibwa) intricate and powerful works unfold stories of difficult experiences. Skawennati's (Mohawk) time-travelling Indian superhero in TimeTravellerTM showcases misinterpretation and abuse of Indigenous art and people. Duane Slick (Meskwaki-Ho-Chunk) creates unnerving work that captures stories on canvas. Anna Tsouhlarkis (Navajo/ Creek/Greek) uses new media to reflect on science and the culture of time.

Central Nigeria Unmasked - Arts of the Benue River Valley (Paperback, New): Marla C. Berns, Richard Fardon, Sidney Littlefield... Central Nigeria Unmasked - Arts of the Benue River Valley (Paperback, New)
Marla C. Berns, Richard Fardon, Sidney Littlefield Kasfir
R1,524 R1,277 Discovery Miles 12 770 Save R247 (16%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Winner of the Arnold Rubin Outstanding Publication Award from the Arts Council of the African Studies Association The Benue River Valley is the source of some of the most abstract, dramatic, and inventive sculpture in sub-Saharan Africa. A vast region, the Valley extends from the heart of present-day Nigeria eastward to its border with Cameroon, and is home to a large number of ethnic and linguistic groups, all of whom have produced sculptures that are remarkable for their variety. This book brings together figurative wood sculptures and ceramic vessels, masks, and elaborate bronze and iron regalia drawn from public and private collections in Europe and the United States, selected to exemplify important typologies within the region, along with many historical photographs. The 18 contributors demonstrate that the stylistic tendencies were constantly evolving due to cultural exchanges, mutual influences, and other points of contact in an area that like the Benue River itself was historically in a state of flux. These objects speak to us not only through their superb formal qualities but also through the circumstances of their being rooted in a turbulent past, situated between war and colonization.

Central Nigeria Unmasked - Arts of the Benue River Valley (Hardcover, New): Marla C. Berns, Richard Fardon, Sidney Littlefield... Central Nigeria Unmasked - Arts of the Benue River Valley (Hardcover, New)
Marla C. Berns, Richard Fardon, Sidney Littlefield Kasfir
R1,996 R1,658 Discovery Miles 16 580 Save R338 (17%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Winner of the Arnold Rubin Outstanding Publication Award from the Arts Council of the African Studies Association The Benue River Valley is the source of some of the most abstract, dramatic, and inventive sculpture in sub-Saharan Africa. A vast region, the Valley extends from the heart of present-day Nigeria eastward to its border with Cameroon, and is home to a large number of ethnic and linguistic groups, all of whom have produced sculptures that are remarkable for their variety. This book brings together figurative wood sculptures and ceramic vessels, masks, and elaborate bronze and iron regalia drawn from public and private collections in Europe and the United States, selected to exemplify important typologies within the region, along with many historical photographs. The 18 contributors demonstrate that the stylistic tendencies were constantly evolving due to cultural exchanges, mutual influences, and other points of contact in an area that like the Benue River itself was historically in a state of flux. These objects speak to us not only through their superb formal qualities but also through the circumstances of their being rooted in a turbulent past, situated between war and colonization.

The Jaguar Within - Shamanic Trance in Ancient Central and South American Art (Hardcover): Rebecca R Stone The Jaguar Within - Shamanic Trance in Ancient Central and South American Art (Hardcover)
Rebecca R Stone
R1,194 R991 Discovery Miles 9 910 Save R203 (17%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Shamanism--the practice of entering a trance state to experience visions of a reality beyond the ordinary and to gain esoteric knowledge--has been an important part of life for indigenous societies throughout the Americas from prehistoric times until the present. Much has been written about shamanism in both scholarly and popular literature, but few authors have linked it to another significant visual realm--art. In this pioneering study, Rebecca R. Stone considers how deep familiarity with, and profound respect for, the extra-ordinary visionary experiences of shamanism profoundly affected the artistic output of indigenous cultures in Central and South America before the European invasions of the sixteenth century.

Using ethnographic accounts of shamanic trance experiences, Stone defines a core set of trance vision characteristics, including enhanced senses, ego dissolution, bodily distortions, flying, spinning and undulating sensations, synaesthesia, and physical transformation from the human self into animal and other states of being. Stone then traces these visionary characteristics in ancient artworks from Costa Rica and Peru. She makes a convincing case that these works, especially those of the Moche, depict shamans in a trance state or else convey the perceptual experience of visions by creating deliberately chaotic and distorted conglomerations of partial, inverted, and incoherent images.

Art Quantum - The Eiteljorg Fellowship for Native American Fine Art, 2009 (Paperback): James H. Nottage Art Quantum - The Eiteljorg Fellowship for Native American Fine Art, 2009 (Paperback)
James H. Nottage
R546 R469 Discovery Miles 4 690 Save R77 (14%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

While blood quantum laws have been used to determine an individual's inclusion in a Native group, Eiteljorg fellowship artists have instead come to view themselves as belonging to the "Art Tribe," through the universal process of art creation and collaboration. Art Quantum presents a selection of the extraordinary work created by the five artists selected for the 2009 Eiteljorg Fellowship. In his essay on the long career of Edward Poitras (Gordon First Nation), Alfred Young Man (Cree) places Poitras's installations in the context of Metis and Indian identity as well as the White art establishment in Canada. Gail Tremblay (Onondaga / Micmac) illuminates the work of Jim Denomie (Ojibwa), reading his narrative paintings and intimately scaled portraits through their complex and humorous references to history, art history, and current events. Jimmie Durham (Cherokee) uses the analogy of music to explore the language of abstraction in sculptural and two-dimensional works by Jeffrey Gibson (Mississippi Band of Choctaw / Cherokee), while the subtle and often monochromatic sculptural installations of Faye HeavyShield (Kainai-Blood) are sensitively interpreted by Lee-Ann Martin (Mohawk). The volume closes with Polly Nordstrand's (Hopi / Norwegian) reflection on the themes of longing/not belonging and placement/displacement that Wendy Red Star (Crow) documents in her photographs and appliqued dance shawls. It is the goal of the Eiteljorg Fellowship to be a starting point and a platform for exploration of Native identity and artistic expression beyond the concepts of blood quantum laws. Essays by James Nottage, Jennifer Complo McNutt, Ashley Holland (Cherokee), and Paul Chaat Smith (Comanche) help to situate the larger issue of Native identity in the contemporary art world.

Our Indian Princess - Subverting the Stereotype (Paperback): Nancy Marie Mithlo Our Indian Princess - Subverting the Stereotype (Paperback)
Nancy Marie Mithlo
R700 Discovery Miles 7 000 Shipped within 7 - 11 working days

Are images and representations central to understanding Native Americans? How do Native artists, as producers of visual culture, respond to what art critic Lucy Lippard has called "the overwhelming burdens" of Indian art? In this pathbreaking study, anthropologist Nancy Mithlo examines the power of stereotypes, the utility of pan-Indianism, the significance of realist ideologies, and the employment of alterity in Native American arts. Addressing the question of how visual referents communicate across cultural divides, she aims to deconstruct the common understanding of stereo-types and suggest that they may play a role in conveying otherness. By using phrases such as "strategic essentialism" and "conventional representations," she analyzes the ways in which disparate groups tend to employ damaged knowledges in trying to communicate their own values and those of contrasting groups, especially when other conceptual tools are unavailable.

The Indian Craze - Primitivism, Modernism, and Transculturation in American Art, 1890-1915 (Hardcover): Elizabeth Hutchinson The Indian Craze - Primitivism, Modernism, and Transculturation in American Art, 1890-1915 (Hardcover)
Elizabeth Hutchinson
R2,021 R1,654 Discovery Miles 16 540 Save R367 (18%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

In the early twentieth century, Native American baskets, blankets, and bowls could be purchased from department stores, "Indian stores," dealers, and the U.S. government's Indian schools. Men and women across the United States indulged in a widespread passion for collecting Native American art, which they displayed in domestic nooks called "Indian corners." Elizabeth Hutchinson identifies this collecting as part of a larger "Indian craze" and links it to other activities such as the inclusion of Native American artifacts in art exhibitions sponsored by museums, arts and crafts societies, and World's Fairs, and the use of indigenous handicrafts as models for non-Native artists exploring formal abstraction and emerging notions of artistic subjectivity. She argues that the Indian craze convinced policymakers that art was an aspect of "traditional" Native culture worth preserving, an attitude that continues to influence popular attitudes and federal legislation.

Illustrating her argument with images culled from late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century publications, Hutchinson revises the standard history of the mainstream interest in Native American material culture as "art." While many locate the development of this cross-cultural interest in the Southwest after the First World War, Hutchinson reveals that it began earlier and spread across the nation from west to east and from reservation to metropolis. She demonstrates that artists, teachers, and critics associated with the development of American modernism, including Arthur Wesley Dow and Gertrude Kasebier, were inspired by Native art. Native artists were also able to achieve some recognition as modern artists, as Hutchinson shows through her discussion of the Winnebago painter and educator Angel DeCora. By taking a transcultural approach, Hutchinson transforms our understanding of the role of Native Americans in modernist culture.

The Indian Craze - Primitivism, Modernism, and Transculturation in American Art, 1890-1915 (Paperback): Elizabeth Hutchinson The Indian Craze - Primitivism, Modernism, and Transculturation in American Art, 1890-1915 (Paperback)
Elizabeth Hutchinson
R546 R473 Discovery Miles 4 730 Save R73 (13%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

In the early twentieth century, Native American baskets, blankets, and bowls could be purchased from department stores, "Indian stores," dealers, and the U.S. government's Indian schools. Men and women across the United States indulged in a widespread passion for collecting Native American art, which they displayed in domestic nooks called "Indian corners." Elizabeth Hutchinson identifies this collecting as part of a larger "Indian craze" and links it to other activities such as the inclusion of Native American artifacts in art exhibitions sponsored by museums, arts and crafts societies, and World's Fairs, and the use of indigenous handicrafts as models for non-Native artists exploring formal abstraction and emerging notions of artistic subjectivity. She argues that the Indian craze convinced policymakers that art was an aspect of "traditional" Native culture worth preserving, an attitude that continues to influence popular attitudes and federal legislation.

Illustrating her argument with images culled from late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century publications, Hutchinson revises the standard history of the mainstream interest in Native American material culture as "art." While many locate the development of this cross-cultural interest in the Southwest after the First World War, Hutchinson reveals that it began earlier and spread across the nation from west to east and from reservation to metropolis. She demonstrates that artists, teachers, and critics associated with the development of American modernism, including Arthur Wesley Dow and Gertrude Kasebier, were inspired by Native art. Native artists were also able to achieve some recognition as modern artists, as Hutchinson shows through her discussion of the Winnebago painter and educator Angel DeCora. By taking a transcultural approach, Hutchinson transforms our understanding of the role of Native Americans in modernist culture.

Art for a Modern India, 1947-1980 (Hardcover): Rebecca M. Brown Art for a Modern India, 1947-1980 (Hardcover)
Rebecca M. Brown
R1,914 R1,565 Discovery Miles 15 650 Save R349 (18%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Following India's independence in 1947, Indian artists creating modern works of art sought to maintain a local idiom, an "Indianness" representative of their newly independent nation, while connecting to modernism, an aesthetic then understood as both universal and presumptively Western. These artists depicted India's precolonial past while embracing aspects of modernism's pursuit of the new, and they challenged the West's dismissal of non-Western places and cultures as sources of primitivist imagery but not of modernist artworks. In "Art for a Modern India," Rebecca M. Brown explores the emergence of a self-conscious Indian modernism--in painting, drawing, sculpture, architecture, film, and photography--in the years between independence and 1980, by which time the Indian art scene had changed significantly and postcolonial discourse had begun to complicate mid-century ideas of nationalism.

Through close analyses of specific objects of art and design, Brown describes how Indian artists engaged with questions of authenticity, iconicity, narrative, urbanization, and science and technology. She explains how the filmmaker Satyajit Ray presented the rural Indian village as a socially complex space rather than as the idealized site of "authentic India" in his acclaimed "Apu Trilogy," how the painter Bhupen Khakhar reworked Indian folk idioms and borrowed iconic images from calendar prints in his paintings of urban dwellers, and how Indian architects developed a revivalist style of bold architectural gestures anchored in India's past as they planned the Ashok Hotel and the Vigyan Bhavan Conference Center, both in New Delhi. Discussing these and other works of art and design, Brown chronicles the mid-twentieth-century trajectory of India's modern visual culture.

The Art and Archaeology of the Moche - An Ancient Andean Society of the Peruvian North Coast (Hardcover): Steve Bourget,... The Art and Archaeology of the Moche - An Ancient Andean Society of the Peruvian North Coast (Hardcover)
Steve Bourget, Kimberly L. Jones
R1,293 R1,072 Discovery Miles 10 720 Save R221 (17%) Shipped within 7 - 12 working days

Renowned for their monumental architecture and rich visual culture, the Moche inhabited the north coast of Peru during the Early Intermediate Period (AD 100-800). Archaeological discoveries over the past century and the dissemination of Moche artifacts to museums around the world have given rise to a widespread and continually increasing fascination with this complex culture, which expressed its beliefs about the human and supernatural worlds through finely crafted ceramic and metal objects of striking realism and visual sophistication.

In this standard-setting work, an international, multidisciplinary team of scholars who are at the forefront of Moche research present a state-of-the-art overview of Moche culture. The contributors address various issues of Moche society, religion, and material culture based on multiple lines of evidence and methodologies, including iconographic studies, archaeological investigations, and forensic analyses. Some of the articles present the results of long-term studies of major issues in Moche iconography, while others focus on more specifically defined topics such as site studies, the influence of El Nino/Southern Oscillation on Moche society, the nature of Moche warfare and sacrifice, and the role of Moche visual culture in decoding social and political frameworks.

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