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Books > Language & Literature > Literature: history & criticism > Literary studies > 19th century

All a Novelist Needs - Colm Toibin on Henry James (Hardcover): Colm Toibin All a Novelist Needs - Colm Toibin on Henry James (Hardcover)
Colm Toibin; Edited by Susan M. Griffin
R1,086 R978 Discovery Miles 9 780 Save R108 (10%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This book collects, for the first time, Colm Toibin's critical essays on Henry James. Shortlisted for the Booker Prize for his novel about James's life, "The Master," Toibin brilliantly analyzes James from a novelist's point of view.

Known for his acuity and originality, Toibin is himself a master of fiction and critical works, which makes this collection of his writings on Henry James essential reading for literary critics. But he also writes for general readers. Until now, these writings have been scattered in introductions, essays in the "Dublin Times," reviews in the "New York Review of Books," and other disparate venues.

With humor and verve, Toibin approaches Henry James's life and work in many and various ways. He reveals a novelist haunted by George Eliot and shows how thoroughly James was a New Yorker. He demonstrates how a new edition of Henry James's letters along with a biography of James's sister-in-law alter and enlarge our understanding of the master. His "Afterword" is a fictional meditation on the written and the unwritten.

Toibin's remarkable insights provide scholars, students, and general readers a fresh encounter with James's well-known texts.

Little Women (Paperback): Louisa May Alcott Little Women (Paperback)
Louisa May Alcott; Edited by Valerie Alderson
R222 R188 Discovery Miles 1 880 Save R34 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Little Women has remained enduringly popular since its publication in 1868, becoming the inspiration for a whole genre of family stories. Set in a small New England community, it tells of the March family: Marmee looks after daughters in the absence of her husband, who is serving as an army chaplain in the Civil War, and Meg, Jo,Beth, and Amy experience domestic trials and triumphs as they attempt to supplement the family's small income. In the second part of the novel (sometimes known as Good Wives) the girls grow up and fall in love. The novel is highly autobiographical, and in Jo's character Alcott portrays a strong-minded and independent woman, determined to control her own destiny. The introduction to this edition provides a fascinating history of the Alcotts,and of Louisa Alcott's own struggles as a writer. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

The Idiot (Paperback): Fyodor Dostoevsky The Idiot (Paperback)
Fyodor Dostoevsky; Edited by Alan Myers; Introduction by William Leatherbarrow
R254 R216 Discovery Miles 2 160 Save R38 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Into a compellingly real portrait of nineteenth-century Russian society, Dostoevsky introduces his ideal hero, the saintly Prince Myshkin. The tensions subsequently unleashed by the hero's innocence, truthfulness, and humility betray the inadequacy of his moral idealism and disclose the spiritual emptiness of a society that cannot accommodate him. Myshkin's mission ends in idiocy and darkness, but it is the world that is rotten, not he. Written under appalling personal circumstances when Dostoevsky was travelling in Europe, The Idiot not only reveals the author's acute artistic sense and penetrating psychological insight, but also affords his most incisive indictment of Russia's struggling to emulate contemporary Europe and sinking under the weight of Western materialism. This new translation by Alan Myers is meticulously faithful to the original and has a critical introduction by W. J. Leatherbarrow. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

A Yeats Dictionary - Persons and Places in the Poetry of W. B. Yeats (Paperback, New edition): James Berenson A Yeats Dictionary - Persons and Places in the Poetry of W. B. Yeats (Paperback, New edition)
James Berenson
R432 Discovery Miles 4 320 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

For William Butler Yeats, ""poetic license"" sometimes meant misquoting writers or misspelling Irish words. This reference guide illuminates the poetry of the Irish writer. ""A Yeats Dictionary: Names of the Persons and Places in the Poetry of W.B. Yeats"" uses Yeats' non-poetic writing, the principle Yeats criticism and the writings of his friends and critics to reveal the depth of his meanings. It identifies geographical, historical and literary references from classical antiquity to Irish culture. The pronunciation and etymological guides enhance the strong cadences of Gaelic words. This dictionary goes beyond mere identification to include biographical information and helpful cross-references to the poet's other works. Readers will learn, for example, that Yeats visited the cottages of Irish peasants to record their stories and superstitions first-hand - material that eventually found its way into his poems.

Robert Louis Stevenson - The Travelling Mind (Paperback): Eileen Dunlop Robert Louis Stevenson - The Travelling Mind (Paperback)
Eileen Dunlop
R157 Discovery Miles 1 570 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

'For we are very lucky, with a lamp before the door And Leerie stops to light it, as he lights so many more...' The picture of a small boy peering from a window at dusk to watch the lamplighter in the street is one of the enduring images of 19th-century Edinburgh, and the child probably the most famous ever brought up there. Robert Louis Stevenson loved to conjure up a dashing, romantic lineage for himself, dreaming that he was descended from the colourful outlaw Rob Roy MacGregor. The reality was less flamboyant but no less remarkable and he would learn that the street lamps of Edinburgh owed their brilliance to the scientific work of his own great-grandfather. This welcome addition to the Robert Louis Stevenson canon gives a concise account of his life - his family background, childhood and adolescence in a Calvinist, hard-working household in Scotland, his travels in three continents and his final years in the South Seas.It examines his relationships with his parents and his nurse, with English and American friends, particularly the family into which he married, and with the Samoan islanders among whom he died at the age of 44. Stevenson's childhood experiences and Scottish identity fed his fertile imagination wherever he found himself. His legacy includes travel writing, essays and poetry, and novels such as "Treasure Island", "Kidnapped", "The Master of Ballantrae", "Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde", "St Ives" and "Weir of Hermiston", still read and enjoyed more than one hundred years after his death. "Robert Louis Stevenson: The Travelling Mind" is an insightful introduction to the life and work of one of the world's best-loved writers.

Charles Dickens: A Very Short Introduction (Paperback): Jenny Hartley Charles Dickens: A Very Short Introduction (Paperback)
Jenny Hartley
R231 R191 Discovery Miles 1 910 Save R40 (17%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Charles Dickens is credited with creating some of the world's best-known fictional characters, and is widely regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian age. Even before reading the works of Dickens many people have met him already in some form or another. His characters have such vitality that they have leapt from his pages to enjoy flourishing lives of their own: The Artful Dodger, Miss Havisham, Scrooge, Fagin, Mr Micawber, and many many more. His portrait has been in our pockets, on our ten-pound notes; he is a national icon, indeed himself a generator of what Englishness signifies. In this Very Short Introduction Jenny Hartley explores the key themes running through Dickens's corpus of works, and considers how they reflect his attitudes towards the harsh realities of nineteenth century society and its institutions, such as the workhouses and prisons. Running alonside this is Dickens's relish of the carnivalesque; if there is a prison in almost every novel, there is also a theatre. She considers Dickens's multiple lives and careers: as magazine editor for two thirds of his working life, as travel writer and journalist, and his work on behalf of social causes including ragged schools and fallen women. She also shows how his public readings enthralled the readers he wanted to reach but also helped to kill him. Finally, Hartley considers what we mean when we use the term 'Dickensian' today, and how Dickens's enduring legacy marks him out as as a novelist different in kind from others. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable. * This book was previously published in hardback as Charles Dickens: An Introduction

A Ring Of Conspirators - Henry James And His Literary Circle, 1895-1915 (Paperback, New ed): Miranda Seymour A Ring Of Conspirators - Henry James And His Literary Circle, 1895-1915 (Paperback, New ed)
Miranda Seymour 2
R264 R184 Discovery Miles 1 840 Save R80 (30%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Henry James left London in 1897 to spend the last two decades of his life in East Sussex where his neighbours included H. G. Wells, Stephen Crane, Ford Madox Ford, Joseph Conrad. In this widely admired study Miranda Seymour aims to cut through 'the mass of evasions ...and misrepresentations' about their relationships with James. She finds that James was cruelly patronizing to protege Wells and to Conrad; that he was annoyed by Ford, an incorrigible romancer; that he envied his rich friend Edith Wharton for her wide readership; that he snubbed Cora Taylor, Crane's lover, after she fled America when her railway-conductor husband was found guilty of murder. Seymour, a descendant of James's close friend, the novelist Howard Sturgis, records how James's critiques of fellow writers often amounted to annihilation and she chronicles his infatuations with handsome young men, including sculptor Hendrik Andersen and poet Rupert Brooke. In this erudite and insightful book that draws on letters and published works, Miranda Seymour vividly recreates the uneasy alliance of writers and personalities in this 'Rye Mafia'.

The Romantic Poetry Handbook (Paperback): Michael O'Neill, Madeleine Callaghan The Romantic Poetry Handbook (Paperback)
Michael O'Neill, Madeleine Callaghan
R695 Discovery Miles 6 950 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

An absorbing survey of poetry written in one of the most revolutionary eras in the history of British literature This comprehensive survey of British Romantic poetry explores the work of six poets whose names are most closely associated with the Romantic era--Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Keats, Byron, and Shelley--as well as works by other significant but less widely studied poets such as Leigh Hunt, Charlotte Smith, Felicia Hemans, and Letitia Elizabeth Landon. Along with its exceptional coverage, the volume is alert to relevant contexts, and opens up ways of understanding Romantic poetry. The Romantic Poetry Handbook encompasses the entire breadth of the Romantic Movement, beginning with Anna Laetitia Barbauld and running through to Thomas Lovell Beddoes and John Clare. In its central section 'Readings' it explores tensions, change, and continuity within the Romantic Movement, and examines a wide range of individual poems and poets through sensitive, attentive and accessible analyses. In addition, the authors provide a full introduction, a detailed historical and cultural timeline, biographies of the poets whose works are featured in the "Readings" section, and a helpful guide to further reading. The Romantic Poetry Handbook is an ideal text for undergraduate and postgraduate study of British Romantic poetry. It also will appeal to every reader with an interest in the Romantics and in poetry generally.

One Toss of the Dice - The Incredible Story of How a Poem Made Us Modern (Hardcover): R.Howard Bloch One Toss of the Dice - The Incredible Story of How a Poem Made Us Modern (Hardcover)
R.Howard Bloch
R545 Discovery Miles 5 450 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The forerunner of our digital age, a French poem about a shipwreck published in 1897, with its mind-bending possibilities of being read up and down, backwards and forwards, even sideways, launched modernism. Stephane Mallarme's "One Toss of the Dice" has for over a century tantalised everyone from physicists to composers to graphic artists. R. Howard Bloch decodes the poem still considered among the most enigmatic ever written. Creating a shimmering portrait of Belle-epoque Paris with a cast of exotic characters-Napoleon III, the Lumiere brothers, Auguste Rodin, Berthe Morisot, even an expatriate American dentist, Bloch positions Mallarme as the spiritual giant of late-nineteenth-century France. Featuring a new translation of the poem by J.D. McClatchy, One Toss of the Dice reveals how a masterpiece shaped our perceptual world.

The Daily Henry David Thoreau - A Year of Quotes from the Man Who Lived in Season (Paperback): Henry David Thoreau, Laura... The Daily Henry David Thoreau - A Year of Quotes from the Man Who Lived in Season (Paperback)
Henry David Thoreau, Laura Dassow Walls 1
R276 Discovery Miles 2 760 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

"Live in each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influence of each." Modernity rules our lives by clock and calendar, dividing the stream of time into units and coordinating every passing moment with the universal globe. Henry David Thoreau subverted both clock and calendar, using them not to regulate time's passing but to open up and explore its presence. This little volume thus embodies, in small compass, Thoreau's own ambition to "live in season"--to turn with the living sundial of the world, and, by attuning ourselves to nature, to heal our modern sense of discontinuity with our surroundings. Ralph Waldo Emerson noted with awe that from flowers alone, Thoreau could tell the calendar date within two days; children remembered long into adulthood how Thoreau showed them white waterlilies awakening not by the face of a clock but at the first touch of the sun. As Thoreau wrote in Walden, "Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in. I drink at it; but while I drink I see the sandy bottom and detect how shallow it is." Drawn from the full range of Thoreau's journals and published writings, and arranged according to season, The Daily Henry David Thoreau allows us to discover the endless variation and surprise to be found in the repetitions of mundane cycles. Thoreau saw in the kernel of each day an earth enchanted, one he honed into sentences tuned with an artist's eye and a musician's ear. Thoreau's world lives on in his writing so that we too may discover, even in a fallen world, a beauty worth defending.

Byron - A Symposium (Paperback, 1st ed. 1975): John D. Jump Byron - A Symposium (Paperback, 1st ed. 1975)
John D. Jump
R2,111 Discovery Miles 21 110 Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Nineteenth-Century Literature in Transition: The 1880s (Hardcover): Penny Fielding, Andrew Taylor Nineteenth-Century Literature in Transition: The 1880s (Hardcover)
Penny Fielding, Andrew Taylor
R1,857 Discovery Miles 18 570 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

What does it mean to focus on the decade as a unit of literary history? Emerging from the shadows of iconic Victorian authors such as Eliot and Tennyson, the 1880s is a decade that has been too readily overlooked in the rush to embrace end-of-century decadence and aestheticism. The 1880s witnessed new developments in transatlantic networks, experiments in lyric poetry, the decline of the three-volume novel, and the revaluation of authors, journalists and the reading public. The contributors to this collection explore the case for the 1880s as both a discrete point of literary production, with its own pressures and provocations, and as part of literature's sense of its expanded temporal and geographical reach. The essays address a wide variety of authors, topics and genres, offering incisive readings of the diverse forces at work in the shaping of the literary 1880s.

Oxford Student Texts: Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Selected Poems (Paperback): Helen Cross Oxford Student Texts: Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Selected Poems (Paperback)
Helen Cross
R344 Discovery Miles 3 440 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Oxford Student Texts offer an accessible route into the study of texts for A Level including line-by-line notes, and detailed sections covering key themes, issues and contexts. This edition focuses on selected poems by Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

Women's Tanci Fiction in Late Imperial and Early Twentieth-Century China (Paperback): Li Guo Women's Tanci Fiction in Late Imperial and Early Twentieth-Century China (Paperback)
Li Guo
R1,130 Discovery Miles 11 300 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In Women's Tanci Fiction in Late Imperial and Early Modern China, Li Guo presents the first book-length study in English of women's tanci fiction, the distinctive Chinese form of narrative written in rhymed lines during the late imperial to early modern period (related to, but different from, the orally performed version also called tanci). She explores the tradition through a comparative analysis of five seminal texts. Guo argues that Chinese women writers of the period position the personal within the diegesis in order to reconfigure their moral commitments and personal desires. By fashioning a "feminine" representation of subjectivity, tanci writers found a habitable space of self-expression in the male-dominated literary tradition. Through her discussion of the emergence, evolution, and impact of women's tanci, Guo shows how historical forces acting on the formation of the genre serve as the background for an investigation of cross-dressing, self-portraiture, and authorial self-representation. Further, Guo approaches anew the concept of "woman-oriented perspective" and argues that this perspective conceptualizes a narrative framework in which the heroine(s) are endowed with mobility to exercise their talent and power as social beings as men's equals. Such a woman-oriented perspective redefines normalized gender roles with an eye to exposing women's potentialities to transform historical and social customs in order to engender a world with better prospects for women.

The Belly of Paris (Paperback): Emile Zola The Belly of Paris (Paperback)
Emile Zola; Translated by Brian Nelson
R238 R201 Discovery Miles 2 010 Save R37 (16%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Unjustly deported to Devil's Island following Louis-Napoleon's coup-d'etat in December 1851, Florent Quenu escapes and returns to Paris. He finds the city changed beyond recognition. The old Marche des Innocents has been knocked down as part of Haussmann's grand program of urban reconstruction, replaced by Les Halles, the spectacular new food markets. Disgusted by a bourgeois society whose devotion to food is inseparable from its devotion to the Government, Florent attempts an insurrection. Les Halles, apocalyptic and destructive, play an active role in Zola's picture of a world in which food and the injustice of society are inextricably linked.
This is the first English translation in fifty years of Le Ventre de Paris (The Belly of Paris). The third in Zola's great cycle, Les Rougon-Macquart, it is as enthralling as Germinal, Therese Raquin, and the other novels in the series. Its focus on the great Paris food hall, Les Halles--combined with Zola's famous impressionist descriptions of food--make this a particularly memorable novel. Brian Nelson's lively translation captures the spirit of Zola's world and his Introduction illuminates the use of food in the novel to represent social class, social attitudes, political conflicts, and other aspect of the culture of the time. The bibliography and notes ensure that this is the most critically up-to-date edition of the novel in print.
About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more."

A Doll's House: York Notes for A-level (Paperback): Frances Gray A Doll's House: York Notes for A-level (Paperback)
Frances Gray
R248 R220 Discovery Miles 2 200 Save R28 (11%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

An enhanced exam section: expert guidance on approaching exam questions, writing high-quality responses and using critical interpretations, plus practice tasks and annotated sample answer extracts. Key skills covered: focused tasks to develop your analysis and understanding, plus regular study tips, revision questions and progress checks to track your learning. The most in-depth analysis: detailed text summaries and extract analysis to in-depth discussion of characters, themes, language, contexts and criticism, all helping you to succeed.

Tess of the D'Urbervilles: York Notes for A-level (Paperback): Karen Sayer, Beth Palmer Tess of the D'Urbervilles: York Notes for A-level (Paperback)
Karen Sayer, Beth Palmer
R220 R189 Discovery Miles 1 890 Save R31 (14%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

The best-selling Literature Study Guides for A Level and AS

The Value of Herman Melville (Paperback): Geoffrey Sanborn The Value of Herman Melville (Paperback)
Geoffrey Sanborn
R369 Discovery Miles 3 690 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

In The Value of Herman Melville, Geoffrey Sanborn presents Melville to us neither as a somber purveyor of dark truths nor as an ironist who has outthought us in advance but as a quasi-maternal provider, a writer who wants more than anything else to supply us with the means of enriching our experiences. In twelve brief chapters, Sanborn examines the distinctive qualities of Melville's style - its dynamism, its improvisatoriness, its intimacy with remembered or imagined events - and shows how those qualities, once they have become a part of our equipment for living, enable us to sink deeper roots into the world. Ranging across his career, but focusing in particular on Moby-Dick, 'Bartleby, the Scrivener', 'Benito Cereno', and Billy Budd, Sanborn shows us a Melville who is animating rather than overawing, who encourages us to bring more of ourselves to the present and to care more about the life that we share with others.

Ivanhoe (Paperback): Walter Scott Ivanhoe (Paperback)
Walter Scott; Edited by Ian Duncan
R251 R213 Discovery Miles 2 130 Save R38 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

More than a century after the Norman Conquest, England remains a colony of foreign warlords. The dissolute Prince John plots to seize his brother's crown, his barons terrorize the country, and the mysterious outlaw Robin Hood haunts the ancient greenwood. The secret return of King Richard and the disinherited Saxon knight, Ivanhoe, heralds the start of a splendid and tumultuous romance, featuring the tournament at Ashby-de-la-Zouche, the siege of Torquilstone, and the clash of wills between the wicked Templar Bois-Guilbert and the sublime Jewess Rebecca. In Ivanhoe Scott fashioned an imperial myth of national cultural identity that has shaped the popular imagination ever since its first appearance at the end of 1819. The most famous of Scottish novelists drew on the conventions of Gothic fiction, including its risky sexual and racial themes, to explore the violent origins and limits of English nationality. This edition uses the 1830 Magnum Opus text, corrected against the Interleaved Set, and incorporates readings from Scott's manuscript. The introduction examines the originality and cultural importance of Ivanhoe, and draws on current work by historians and cultural critics. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Wuthering Heights: York Notes for A-level (Paperback): Claire Steele Wuthering Heights: York Notes for A-level (Paperback)
Claire Steele
R224 R194 Discovery Miles 1 940 Save R30 (13%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

An enhanced exam section: expert guidance on approaching exam questions, writing high-quality responses and using critical interpretations, plus practice tasks and annotated sample answer extracts. Key skills covered: focused tasks to develop your analysis and understanding, plus regular study tips, revision questions and progress checks to track your learning. The most in-depth analysis: detailed text summaries and extract analysis to in-depth discussion of characters, themes, language, contexts and criticism, all helping you to succeed.

Heidegger's Bicycle - Interfering with Victorian Texts (Paperback, New): Roger Ebbatson Heidegger's Bicycle - Interfering with Victorian Texts (Paperback, New)
Roger Ebbatson
R438 R392 Discovery Miles 3 920 Save R46 (11%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

In the 1990s it was the French theorists such as Derrida, Lacan and Foucault who, with their stress on linguistic play and undecidability, took Victorian Studies by storm; now, it seems, it is the Germans who are coming. In Roger Ebbatsons new book, Marx, Simmel, Benjamin and, above all, Heidegger are unleashed on a range of Victorian texts -- some unsuspecting, some all too suspecting. The results are alarming: Ebbatson begins with Tennyson overshadowed by empire and homosocial tensions and ends with Conan Doyle writing about a bicycle belonging to a character called Heidegger. In between, he makes bone-shaking progress over a Victorian terrain marked out by Thomas Hardy, Richard Jefferies, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Robert Louis Stevenson; along the way, Ebbatson considers shipwrecks, money, nature, the South Seas Mission, and final solutions. Tennyson, we discover, was afraid of his own shadow, Hopkinss greatest poem was created by erratic compasses, Hardy wrote like Kafka, Stevenson was drawn to murderous missionaries, and Conan Doyle applauded the concentration camp. Ebbatson shows us that what the Germans bring to our understanding of the nineteenth century is a terrible awareness of the darkest moments of the darkest moments of the twentieth century.

Oxford Student Texts: The Brontes - Selected Poems (Paperback): Helen Cross Oxford Student Texts: The Brontes - Selected Poems (Paperback)
Helen Cross; Series edited by Steven Croft
R343 Discovery Miles 3 430 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Oxford Student Texts offer an accessible route into the study of texts for A Level including line-by-line notes, and detailed sections covering key themes, issues and contexts. This edition focuses on selected poems by the Brontes.

Thomas Hardy and the Survivals of Time (Hardcover, New Ed): Andrew Radford Thomas Hardy and the Survivals of Time (Hardcover, New Ed)
Andrew Radford
R3,057 Discovery Miles 30 570 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

A systematic exploration of Thomas Hardy's imaginative assimilation of particular Victorian sciences, this study draws on and swells the widening current of scholarly attention now being paid to the cultural meanings compacted and released by the nascent 'sciences of man' in the nineteenth century. Andrew Radford here situates Hardy's fiction and poetry in a context of the new sciences of humankind that evolved during the Victorian age to accommodate an immense range of literal and figurative 'excavations' then taking place. Combining literary close readings with broad historical analyses, he explores Hardy's artistic response to geological, archaeological and anthropological findings. In particular, he analyzes Hardy's lifelong fascination with the doctrine of 'survivals,' a term coined by E.B. Tylor in Primitive Culture (1871) to denote customs, beliefs and practices persisting in isolation from their original cultural context. Radford reveals how Hardy's subtle reworking of Tylor's doctrine offers a valuable insight into the inter-penetration of science and literature during this period. An important aspect of Radford's research focuses on lesser known periodical literature that grew out of a British amateur antiquarian tradition of the nineteenth century. His readings of Hardy's literary notebooks disclose the degree to which Hardy's own considerable scientific knowledge was shaped by the middlebrow periodical press. Thus Thomas Hardy and the Survivals of Time raises questions not only about the reception of scientific ideas but also the creation of nonspecialist forms of scientific discourse. This book represents a genuinely new perspective for Hardy studies.

War, the Hero & the Will - Hardy, Tolstoy & the Napoleonic Wars (Hardcover): Jane L. Bownas War, the Hero & the Will - Hardy, Tolstoy & the Napoleonic Wars (Hardcover)
Jane L. Bownas
R1,388 R1,141 Discovery Miles 11 410 Save R247 (18%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Thomas Hardy's "The Dynasts" and Leo Tolstoy's "War & Peace" are both works which defy attempts to assign them to a particular genre but might seem to have little else in common apart from being set in the same period of history. This study argues that there are important similarities between these two works and examines the close correspondence between Hardy's and Tolstoy's thinking on themes relating to war, ideas of the heroic and the concept of free will. Although coming from very different backgrounds, both writers were influenced by their experiences of war, Tolstoy directly, by involvement in the wars in the Caucasus and the Crimea, and Hardy indirectly, by the events of the Anglo-Boer Wars. Their reaction to these experiences found expression in their descriptions of the wars fought against Napoleon at the beginning of the century. Hegel saw Napoleon as 'the great world-historical man of his time', and this work considers the ways in which Hardy and Tolstoy undermine this view, portraying Napoleon's physical and mental decline and questioning the role he played in determining the outcomes of military actions. Both writers were deeply interested in the question of free will and determinism and their writings reveal their attempts to understand the nature of the force which lies behind men's actions. Their differing views on the nature of consciousness are considered in the light of modern research on the development of the conscious brain.

Charles Dickens - An Introduction (Hardcover): Jenny Hartley Charles Dickens - An Introduction (Hardcover)
Jenny Hartley
R289 R242 Discovery Miles 2 420 Save R47 (16%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Charles Dickens is credited with creating some of the world's best-known fictional characters, and is widely regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian age. Even before reading the works of Dickens many people have met him already in some form or another. His characters have such vitality that they have leapt from his pages to enjoy flourishing lives of their own: The Artful Dodger, Miss Havisham, Scrooge, Fagin, Mr Micawber, and many many more. His portrait has been in our pockets, on our ten-pound notes; he is a national icon, indeed himself a generator of what Englishness signifies. In this book Jenny Hartley explores the key themes running through Dickens's corpus of works, and considers how they reflect his attitudes towards the harsh realities of nineteenth century society and its institutions, such as the workhouses and prisons. Running alonside this is Dickens's relish of the carnivalesque; if there is a prison in almost every novel, there is also a theatre. She considers Dickens's multiple lives and careers: as magazine editor for two thirds of his working life, as travel writer and journalist, and his work on behalf of social causes including ragged schools and fallen women. She also shows how his public readings enthralled the readers he wanted to reach but also helped to kill him. Finally, Hartley considers what we mean when we use the term 'Dickensian' today, and how Dickens's enduring legacy marks him out as as a novelist different in kind from others.

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