0
Your cart

Your cart is empty

Browse All departments
Price
  • R50 - R100 (9)
  • R100 - R250 (1,142)
  • R250 - R500 (3,628)
  • R500+ (7,700)
  • -
Status
Format
Author / Contributor
Publisher

Books > Humanities > History > American history > 1800 to 1900

Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War - Exposing Confederate Conspiracies in America's Heartland (Hardcover): Stephen E.... Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War - Exposing Confederate Conspiracies in America's Heartland (Hardcover)
Stephen E. Towne
R1,886 R1,604 Discovery Miles 16 040 Save R282 (15%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

"Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War" represents pathbreaking research on the rise of U.S. Army intelligence operations in the Midwest during the American Civil War and counters long-standing assumptions about Northern politics and society. At the beginning of the rebellion, state governors in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois cooperated with federal law enforcement officials in various attempts--all failed--to investigate reports of secret groups and individuals who opposed the Union war effort.
Starting in 1862, army commanders took it upon themselves to initiate investigations of antiwar sentiment in those states. By 1863, several of them had established intelligence operations staffed by hired civilian detectives and by soldiers detailed from their units to chase down deserters and draft dodgers, to maintain surveillance on suspected persons and groups, and to investigate organized resistance to the draft. By 1864, these spies had infiltrated secret organizations that, sometimes in collaboration with Confederate rebels, aimed to subvert the war effort.
Stephen E. Towne is the first to thoroughly explore the role and impact of Union spies against Confederate plots in the North. This new analysis invites historians to delve more deeply into the fabric of the Northern wartime experience and reinterpret the period based on broader archival evidence.

Shiloh National Military Park (Paperback): Brian K McCutchen, Timothy B. Smith Shiloh National Military Park (Paperback)
Brian K McCutchen, Timothy B. Smith; Foreword by Woody Harrell
R472 R390 Discovery Miles 3 900 Save R82 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Michigan and the Civil War - A Great and Bloody Sacrifice (Paperback): Jack Dempsey Michigan and the Civil War - A Great and Bloody Sacrifice (Paperback)
Jack Dempsey
R472 R390 Discovery Miles 3 900 Save R82 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

With lively narration, telling anecdotes, and vivid battlefield accounts, Michigan and the Civil War tells the story as never before of Michigan's heroic contributions to saving the Union. Beginning with Michigan's antebellum period and anti-slavery heritage, the book proceeds through Michigan's rapid response to President Lincoln's call to arms, its participation in each of the War's greatest battles, portrayal of its most interesting personalities, and the concluding triumph as Custer corners Lee at Appomattox and the 4th Michigan Cavalry apprehends the fleeing Jeff Davis. Based on thorough and up-to-date research, the result is surprising in its breadth, sometimes awe-inspiring, and always a revelation given how contributions by the Great Lake State in the Civil War are too often overlooked, even by its own citizens.

Unredeemed Land - An Environmental History of Civil War and Emancipation in the Cotton South (Hardcover): Erin Stewart Mauldin Unredeemed Land - An Environmental History of Civil War and Emancipation in the Cotton South (Hardcover)
Erin Stewart Mauldin
R648 Discovery Miles 6 480 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

How did the Civil War and the emancipation of the South's four million slaves reconfigure the natural landscape and the farming economy dependent upon it? An innovative reconsideration of the Civil War's role in southern history, Unredeemed Land uncovers the environmental constraints that shaped the rural South's transition to capitalism during the late nineteenth century. Dixie's "King Cotton" required extensive land use techniques, fresh soil, and slave-based agriculture in order to remain profitable. But wartime destruction and the rise of the contract labor system closed off those possibilities and necessitated increasingly intensive cultivation in ways that worked against the environment. The resulting disconnect between farmers' use of the land and what the natural environment could support went hand-in-hand with the economic dislocation of freedpeople, poor farmers, and sharecroppers. Erin Stewart Mauldin demonstrates how the Civil War and emancipation accelerated ongoing ecological change in ways that hastened the postbellum collapse of the region's subsistence economy, encouraged the expansion of cotton production, and ultimately kept cotton farmers trapped in a cycle of debt and tenancy. The first environmental history to bridge the antebellum, Civil War, and Reconstruction periods, this work will appeal to anyone who is interested in the landscape of the South or the legacies of the Civil War.

Sweet Taste of Liberty - A True Story of Slavery and Restitution in America (Hardcover): W. Caleb McDaniel Sweet Taste of Liberty - A True Story of Slavery and Restitution in America (Hardcover)
W. Caleb McDaniel
R647 R534 Discovery Miles 5 340 Save R113 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The unforgettable saga of one enslaved woman's fight for justice-and reparations Born into slavery, Henrietta Wood was taken to Cincinnati and legally freed in 1848. In 1853, a Kentucky deputy sheriff named Zebulon Ward colluded with Wood's employer, abducted her, and sold her back into bondage. She remained enslaved throughout the Civil War, giving birth to a son in Mississippi and never forgetting who had put her in this position. By 1869, Wood had obtained her freedom for a second time and returned to Cincinnati, where she sued Ward for damages in 1870. Astonishingly, after eight years of litigation, Wood won her case: in 1878, a Federal jury awarded her $2,500. The decision stuck on appeal. More important than the amount, though the largest ever awarded by an American court in restitution for slavery, was the fact that any money was awarded at all. By the time the case was decided, Ward had become a wealthy businessman and a pioneer of convict leasing in the South. Wood's son later became a prominent Chicago lawyer, and she went on to live until 1912. McDaniel's book is an epic tale of a black woman who survived slavery twice and who achieved more than merely a moral victory over one of her oppressors. Above all,Sweet Taste of Libertyis a portrait of an extraordinary individual as well as a searing reminder of the lessons of her story, which establish beyond question the connections between slavery and the prison system that rose in its place.

Alexandria's Freedmen's Cemetery - A Legacy of Freedom (Paperback): Char McCargo Bah Alexandria's Freedmen's Cemetery - A Legacy of Freedom (Paperback)
Char McCargo Bah; Edited by Mumini M Bah
R484 R402 Discovery Miles 4 020 Save R82 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Writing War and Reunion - Selected Civil War and Reconstruction Newspaper Editorials by William Gilmore Simms (Hardcover):... Writing War and Reunion - Selected Civil War and Reconstruction Newspaper Editorials by William Gilmore Simms (Hardcover)
Jeffery J. Rogers
R1,402 Discovery Miles 14 020 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

William Gilmore Simms (1806-1870) was a novelist, poet, and essayist and was considered the South's premier literary figure at the height of his popularity. No less an authority than Edgar Allen Poe remarked of Simms that "he has surpassed, we think, any of his countrymen" as a novelist. Simms's literary achievements include more than twenty major novels, several volumes of poetry, and biographies of important figures in American history. Perhaps the least considered parts of Simms's overall body of writings are those he did for newspapers, the most interesting of which are from the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Writing War and Reunion offers a selection of the best of those so that we can track Simms's thoughts about, and reactions to, the conflict, from its beginnings through to its conclusion and into the early years of Reconstruction. These works provide a valuable insight into how a prominent southern intellectual interpreted and participated in these momentous events in U.S. history. In the decades following the Civil War, Simms's reputation suffered a steady decline. Because of his associations with the antebellum South, slavery, and Confederate defeat, as well as changes in literary tastes, Simms came to be regarded as a talented but failed Southern author of a bygone era. Today a robust scholarly literature exists that has reexamined Simms, his literary works, and previous scholarly judgments and finds him to have been an important figure in the development of nineteenth-century American literature and worthy of serious study.

Down Along with That Devil's Bones - A Reckoning with Monuments, Memory, and the Legacy of White Supremacy (Standard... Down Along with That Devil's Bones - A Reckoning with Monuments, Memory, and the Legacy of White Supremacy (Standard format, CD)
Geoffrey Cantor; Connor Town O'Neill
R615 R456 Discovery Miles 4 560 Save R159 (26%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Into Tennessee and Failure - John Bell Hood (Hardcover): Stephen Davis Into Tennessee and Failure - John Bell Hood (Hardcover)
Stephen Davis
R747 R596 Discovery Miles 5 960 Save R151 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Into Tennessee and Failure is the second volume of Stephen Davis's study of John Bell Hood's generalship in 1864. Volume One, Into Tennessee and Failure traces Hood's rise from lieutenant of cavalry in Virginia to commanding general of the Army of Tennessee. In his first test as Confederate general, July-September 1864, Hood failed to prevent Sherman's capture of Atlanta. Here Davis picks up the story in September-October 1864, tracing Hood and his army into North Georgia and Alabama. Entering Tennessee in late November, Hood's forces failed to trap Union Maj. Gen. John Schofield's infantry at Spring Hill. On November 30, Hood ordered his soldiers to attack Schofield's fortified lines at Franklin. A tragic and bloody repulse followed. Schofield escaped to Nashville, joining Maj. Gen. George Thomas's forces. With few options left, Hood approached Nashville and had his troops dig in. Though his army was half the size of Thomas's 50,000, Hood hoped to win a defensive victory when Thomas attacked him. Instead, in the battle of Nashville, December 15-16, the Army of Tennessee was routed from the field. By the time it ended its retreat in North Mississippi, Confederate authorities were ready to relieve Hood from command. Seeing it coming, the general offered his resignation in January 1865. Davis's theme in Volume One was the ambition that drove Hood to seek higher and higher rank. Here, while recognizing Hood's loyalty to the Confederate cause, he discerns Hood's unflattering traits: questioning the courage of his men, bickering with other generals, and concealing from his superiors the extent of his disaster in Tennessee.

With Ballots and Bullets - Partisanship and Violence in the American Civil War (Paperback): Nathan Kalmoe With Ballots and Bullets - Partisanship and Violence in the American Civil War (Paperback)
Nathan Kalmoe
R645 R520 Discovery Miles 5 200 Save R125 (19%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

What happens when partisanship is pushed to its extreme? In With Ballots and Bullets, Nathan P. Kalmoe combines historical and political science approaches to provide new insight into the American Civil War and deepen contemporary understandings of mass partisanship. The book reveals the fundamental role of partisanship in shaping the dynamics and legacies of the Civil War, drawing on an original analysis of newspapers and geo-coded data on voting returns and soldier enlistments, as well as retrospective surveys. Kalmoe shows that partisan identities motivated mass violence by ordinary citizens, not extremists, when activated by leaders and legitimated by the state. Similar processes also enabled partisans to rationalize staggering war casualties into predetermined vote choices, shaping durable political habits and memory after the war's end. Findings explain much about nineteenth century American politics, but the book also yields lessons for today, revealing the latent capacity of political leaders to mobilize violence.

With Malice toward Some - Treason and Loyalty in the Civil War Era (Hardcover, New edition): William A. Blair With Malice toward Some - Treason and Loyalty in the Civil War Era (Hardcover, New edition)
William A. Blair
R927 R739 Discovery Miles 7 390 Save R188 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Few issues created greater consensus among Civil War-era northerners than the belief that the secessionists had committed treason. But as William A. Blair shows in this engaging history, the way politicians, soldiers, and civilians dealt with disloyalty varied widely. Citizens often moved more swiftly than federal agents in punishing traitors in their midst, forcing the government to rethink legal practices and definitions. In reconciling the northern contempt for treachery with a demonstrable record of judicial leniency toward the South, Blair illuminates the other ways that northerners punished perceived traitors, including confiscating slaves, arresting newspaper editors for expressions of free speech, and limiting voting. Ultimately, punishment for treason extended well beyond wartime and into the framework of Reconstruction policies, including the construction of the Fourteenth Amendment. Establishing how treason was defined not just by the Lincoln administration, Congress, and the courts but also by the general public, Blair reveals the surprising implications for North and South alike.

Citizen-General - Jacob Dolson Cox and the Civil War Era (Paperback): Eugene D Schmiel Citizen-General - Jacob Dolson Cox and the Civil War Era (Paperback)
Eugene D Schmiel
R605 R492 Discovery Miles 4 920 Save R113 (19%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

A History Book Club Reading Selection The wrenching events of the Civil War transformed not only the United States but also the men unexpectedly called on to lead their fellow citizens in this first modern example of total war. Jacob Dolson Cox, a former divinity student with no formal military training, was among those who rose to the challenge. In a conflict in which "political generals" often proved less than competent, Cox, the consummate citizen general, emerged as one of the best commanders in the Union army. During his school days at Oberlin College, no one could have predicted that the intellectual, reserved, and bookish Cox possessed what he called in his writings the "military aptitude" to lead men effectively in war. His military career included helping secure West Virginia for the Union; jointly commanding the left wing of the Union army at the critical Battle of Antietam; breaking the Confederate supply line and thereby precipitating the fall of Atlanta; and holding the defensive line at the Battle of Franklin, a Union victory that effectively ended the Confederate threat in the West. At a time when there were few professional schools other than West Point, the self-made man was the standard for success; true to that mode, Cox fashioned himself into a Renaissance man. In each of his vocations and avocations-general, governor, cabinet secretary, university president, law school dean, railroad president, historian, and scientist-he was recognized as a leader. Cox's greatest fame, however, came to him as the foremost participant historian of the Civil War. His accounts of the conflict are to this day cited by serious scholars and serve as a foundation for the interpretation of many aspects of the war.

Citizen-General - Jacob Dolson Cox and the Civil War Era (Hardcover): Eugene D Schmiel Citizen-General - Jacob Dolson Cox and the Civil War Era (Hardcover)
Eugene D Schmiel
R1,463 Discovery Miles 14 630 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

A History Book Club Reading Selection The wrenching events of the Civil War transformed not only the United States but also the men unexpectedly called on to lead their fellow citizens in this first modern example of total war. Jacob Dolson Cox, a former divinity student with no formal military training, was among those who rose to the challenge. In a conflict in which "political generals" often proved less than competent, Cox, the consummate citizen general, emerged as one of the best commanders in the Union army. During his school days at Oberlin College, no one could have predicted that the intellectual, reserved, and bookish Cox possessed what he called in his writings the "military aptitude" to lead men effectively in war. His military career included helping secure West Virginia for the Union; jointly commanding the left wing of the Union army at the critical Battle of Antietam; breaking the Confederate supply line and thereby precipitating the fall of Atlanta; and holding the defensive line at the Battle of Franklin, a Union victory that effectively ended the Confederate threat in the West. At a time when there were few professional schools other than West Point, the self-made man was the standard for success; true to that mode, Cox fashioned himself into a Renaissance man. In each of his vocations and avocations-general, governor, cabinet secretary, university president, law school dean, railroad president, historian, and scientist-he was recognized as a leader. Cox's greatest fame, however, came to him as the foremost participant historian of the Civil War. His accounts of the conflict are to this day cited by serious scholars and serve as a foundation for the interpretation of many aspects of the war.

Gettysburg's Most Hellish Battleground - The Devil's Den, July 2, 1863 (Paperback): Phillip Thomas Tucker Gettysburg's Most Hellish Battleground - The Devil's Den, July 2, 1863 (Paperback)
Phillip Thomas Tucker
R475 R391 Discovery Miles 3 910 Save R84 (18%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

During the crucial three days of combat at Gettysburg, the most nightmarish place on the entire battlefield was appropriately named the Devil's Den. This jumble of huge boulders situated at the southern end of Houck's Ridge was truly a hell on earth during the decisive afternoon of July 2, 1863. The tenacious struggle that raged beyond control at the battle-line's southern end was all-important, because the Devil's Den and Houck's Ridge anchored the left flank of the over-extended Union battle-line, before Federal troops occupied Little Round Top to the east. The battle-hardened veterans of Lieutenant General James Longstreet's First Corps captured this vital sector-- the first Union left flank--in one of the few Southern successes of the second day, after some of the war's most bitter fighting. Nevertheless, the dramatic story of the successful turning of the first Union left flank has been long overlooked and ignored largely because of the giant historical shadow cast by the more famous struggle at Little Round Top, which was only the second and last fight for the southern flank of both armies on July 2. Therefore, the important contest for possession of the first Union left flank at the Devil's Den and Houck's Ridge was crucial on the bloody afternoon that decided the fate of America.

Sam Richards's Civil War Diary - A Chronicle of the Atlanta Home Front (Hardcover): Samuel Pearce Richards Sam Richards's Civil War Diary - A Chronicle of the Atlanta Home Front (Hardcover)
Samuel Pearce Richards; Edited by Wendy Hamand Venet
R822 R764 Discovery Miles 7 640 Save R58 (7%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

A man, his family, and his city, brought vividly to life. This previously unpublished diary is the best surviving firsthand account of life in Civil War - era Atlanta. Bookseller Samuel Pearce Richards (1824-1910) kept a diary for sixty-seven years. This volume excerpts the diary from October 1860, just before the presidential election of Abraham Lincoln, through August 1865, when the Richards family returned to Atlanta after being forced out by Sherman's troops and spending a period of exile in New York City. The Richards??i??i??' were among the last Confederate loyalists to leave Atlanta. Sam's recollections of the Union bombardment, the evacuation of the city, the looting of his store, and the influx of Yankee forces are riveting. Sam was a Unionist until 1860, when his sentiments shifted in favor of the Confederacy. However, as he wrote in early 1862, he had ""no ambition to acquire military renown and glory."" Likewise, Sam chafed at financial setbacks caused by the war and at Confederate policies that seemed to limit his freedom. Such conflicted attitudes come through even as Sam writes about civic celebrations, benefit concerts, and the chaotic optimism of life in a strategically critical rebel stronghold. He also reflects with soberness on hospitals filled with wounded soldiers, the threat of epidemics, inflation, and food shortages. A man of deep faith who liked to attend churches all over town, Sam often comments on Atlanta's religious life and grounds his defense of slavery and secession in the Bible. Sam owned and rented slaves, and his diary is a window into race relations at a time when the end of slavery was no longer unthinkable. Perhaps most important, the diary conveys the tenor of Sam's family life. Both Sam and his wife, Sallie, came from families divided politically and geographically by war. They feared for their children's health and mourned for relatives wounded and killed in battle. The figures in Sam Richards' ""Civil War Diary"" emerge as real people; the intimate experience of the Civil War home front is conveyed with great power.

Eli Hill - A Novel of Reconstruction (Hardcover): Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin Eli Hill - A Novel of Reconstruction (Hardcover)
Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin; Edited by Bruce Baker, Jacquelyn Dowd Hall
R2,377 Discovery Miles 23 770 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin's 1946 autobiography The Making of a Southerner is considered a classic testament of a white southerner's commitment to racial justice in a culture where little was to be found. Lumpkin's unpublished novel Eli Hill, which was discovered in Lumpkin's papers after her death, contributes to the same struggle by imaginatively re-creating a historical figure and a moment in the violent white resistance to Reconstruction. Born to enslaved parents in York County, South Carolina, Elias Hill (1819-1872) learned to read and write and became a popular Baptist minister. Owing to his influence, Hill was one of many victims of a series of vicious attacks by the Ku Klux Klan. After testifying before a congressional committee that emigration was the only solution, Hill and 135 other formerly enslaved people emigrated to Liberia. Lumpkin had trained as a sociologist and historian to use archival sources and data in arguing for socioeconomic change. In her autobiography, she uses the lens of an individual life, her own, to understand how racism was inculcated in white children and how they could free themselves from its grip. With Eli Hill, she turns to imagination, informed by archival research, to put an African American man at the center of a story about Reconstruction. In curating this important work of historical recovery for use in the classroom, Bruce Baker and Jacquelyn Dowd Hall have included the full text of the original manuscript and an introduction that contextualizes the novel in both its historical setting and its creation.

The Forty-Eighters on Possum Creek - A Texas Civil War Story (Paperback, Annotated edition): James C. Kearney The Forty-Eighters on Possum Creek - A Texas Civil War Story (Paperback, Annotated edition)
James C. Kearney; W A Trenckmann
R642 R545 Discovery Miles 5 450 Save R97 (15%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The Forty-Eighters of Possum Creek: A Texas Civil War Story is a departure for State House Press. This remarkable work of vintage historical fiction focuses on the life of one young man, Kuno Sartorius, who grows up and comes of age in a community of educated German immigrants during the waning months of the Civil War. Author William Trenckmann serialized the novel in his newspaper, Das Bellville Wochenblatt [The Bellville Weekly]. His novel, Die Lateiner am Possum Creek is one of the few works of fiction to treat the plight of the minority Texas Germans during the war.However, it is more than a German story, and provides vignettes of all aspects of life, and of all classes in Texas, on both the home front and the Trans-Mississippi theater. Throughout are the young men from all walks of life brought together by Confederate conscription and facing the same hardships of war. Expertly translated and annotated by James C. Kearney, this novel becomes a shadow memoir of the American Civil War. The educated German settlers of Millheim had fled their native land because of strife and revolution, choosing the bucolic life on the Texas frontier over the sophisticated university towns of Germany. Their children, though, faced uncertainties of their own as Texas seceded and joined the Confederacy and depended on all military aged men to do their part in a cause few Germans in the neighborhood cared for, and to perpetuate slavery which most abhorred. Kearney's notes help the reader navigate the story, and reveal the 'story behind the story.'

American Discord - The Republic and Its People in the Civil War Era (Hardcover): Lesley J Gordon, Megan L. Bever, Laura... American Discord - The Republic and Its People in the Civil War Era (Hardcover)
Lesley J Gordon, Megan L. Bever, Laura Mammina, Gary W. Gallagher, Lawrence A. Kreiser Jr, …
R1,139 Discovery Miles 11 390 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

A panoramic collection of essays written by both established and emerging scholars, American Discord examines critical aspects of the Civil War era, including rhetoric and nationalism, politics and violence, gender, race, and religion. Beginning with an overview of the political culture of the 1860s, the collection reveals that most Americans entered the decade opposed to political compromise. Essays from Megan L. Bever, Glenn David Brasher, Lawrence A. Kreiser Jr., and Christian McWhirter discuss the rancorous political climate of the day and the sense of racial superiority woven into the political fabric of the era. Shifting focus to the actual war, Rachel K. Deale, Lindsay Rae Privette, Adam H. Petty, and A. Wilson Greene contribute essays on internal conflict, lack of compromise, and commitment to white supremacy. Here, contributors adopt a broad understanding of ""battle,"" considering environmental effects and the impact of the war after the battles were over. Essays by Laura Mammina and Charity Rakestraw and Kristopher A. Teters reveal that while the war blurred the boundaries, it ultimately prompted Americans to grasp for the familiar established hierarchies of gender and race. Examinations of chaos and internal division suggest that the political culture of Reconstruction was every bit as contentious as the war itself. Former Confederates decried the barbarity of their Yankee conquerors, while Republicans portrayed Democrats as backward rubes in need of civilizing. Essays by Kevin L. Hughes, Daniel J. Burge, T. Robert Hart, John F. Marszalek, and T. Michael Parrish highlight Americans' continued reliance on hyperbolic rhetoric. American Discord embraces a multifaceted view of the Civil War and its aftermath, attempting to capture the complicated human experiences of the men and women caught in the conflict. These essays acknowledge that ordinary people and their experiences matter, and the dynamics among family members, friends, and enemies have far-reaching consequences.

Fighting in the Shadows - The Untold Story of Deaf People in the Civil War (Hardcover): Harry G. Lang Fighting in the Shadows - The Untold Story of Deaf People in the Civil War (Hardcover)
Harry G. Lang
R834 Discovery Miles 8 340 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This visually rich volume presents Harry G. Lang's groundbreaking study of deaf people's experiences in the Civil War. Based on meticulous archival research, Fighting in the Shadows reveals the stories of both ordinary and extraordinary deaf soldiers and civilians who lived during this transformative period in American history. Lang documents the participation of deaf soldiers in the war, whose personal tests of fortitude and perseverance have not been previously explored. There were also many deaf people in noncombat roles whose stories have not yet been told clerks and cooks, nurses and spies, tradespeople supporting the armies, farmers supplying food to soldiers, and landowners who assisted (or resisted) troops during battles. Deaf writers, diarists, and artists documented the war. Even deaf children contributed actively to the war efforts. Lang pieces together hundreds of stories, accompanied by numerous historical images, to reveal a powerful new perspective on the Civil War. These soldiers and civilians were not "disabled" by their deafness. On the contrary, despite the marginalization and paternalism they experienced in society, they were able to apply their skills and knowledge to support the causes in which they ardently believed. Fighting in the Shadows is a story of how deaf civilians and soldiers put aside personal concerns about deafness, in spite of the discrimination they faced daily, in order to pursue a cause larger than themselves. Yet their stories have remained in the shadows, leaving most Americans, hearing and deaf, largely unaware of the deaf people who made significant contributions to the events that changed the course of our nation's history. This book provides new insights into Deaf history as well as into mainstream interpretations of the Civil War.

Going Back the Way They Came - The Philips Georgia Legion Cavalry Battalion (Hardcover, annotated edition): Going Back the Way They Came - The Philips Georgia Legion Cavalry Battalion (Hardcover, annotated edition)
R921 R833 Discovery Miles 8 330 Save R88 (10%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

This is the history of a legendary battalion. The product of more than a decade's toil, ""Going Back the Way They Came"" is a thoroughly researched, comprehensive book that details the organization of the Philips Georgia Legion Cavalry Battalion unit and its combat odyssey. Using letters, diaries, period images, newspaper articles, archives, and other forgotten sites throughout north Georgia, the author tells the story of this battalion. The result is a highly readable book that takes the reader on horseback through several of the major battles in the Eastern Theater of the Civil War. The reader not only sees the word on the page of the book, but also feels the pain and glory, smells the stenches, and hears the booms of gun and artillery in this accessible narrative. The text is sprinkled with never-before-published images. Detailed appendixes include annotated rosters for each cavalry company. ""Going Back the Way They Came"" is solid Civil War scholarship, and a narrative that is hard to put down.

The Struggle for Equality - Abolitionists and the Negro in the Civil War and Reconstruction - Updated Edition (Paperback,... The Struggle for Equality - Abolitionists and the Negro in the Civil War and Reconstruction - Updated Edition (Paperback, Revised edition)
James M Mcpherson; Preface by James M Mcpherson
R575 R449 Discovery Miles 4 490 Save R126 (22%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Originally published in 1964, The Struggle for Equality presents an incisive and vivid look at the abolitionist movement and the legal basis it provided to the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian James McPherson explores the role played by rights activists during and after the Civil War, and their evolution from despised fanatics into influential spokespersons for the radical wing of the Republican Party. Asserting that it was not the abolitionists who failed to instill principles of equality, but rather the American people who refused to follow their leadership, McPherson raises questions about the obstacles that have long hindered American reform movements.

This new Princeton Classics edition marks the fiftieth anniversary of the book's initial publication and includes a new preface by the author.

Gettysburg (Paperback): Thomas R Flagel Gettysburg (Paperback)
Thomas R Flagel
R354 R265 Discovery Miles 2 650 Save R89 (25%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Gettysburg is widely considered to be the turning point of the Civil War and one of the most epic clashes of arms in all of military history, from the legendary stand of Joshua Chamberlain to the disastrous Pickett's Charge on the battle's third and final day. In this installment in the Battle Briefings series, Thomas Flagel provides an accessible and informative introduction to the battle.

The Diary of Serepta Jordan - A Southern Woman's Struggle with War and Family, 1857-1864 (Paperback): Minoa Uffelman,... The Diary of Serepta Jordan - A Southern Woman's Struggle with War and Family, 1857-1864 (Paperback)
Minoa Uffelman, Ellen Williamson Kanervo, Eleanor S. Williams
R927 R723 Discovery Miles 7 230 Save R204 (22%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Discovered in a smokehouse in the mid-1980s, the diary of Serepta Jordan provides a unique window into the lives of Confederates living in occupied territory in upper middle Tennessee. A massive tome, written in a sturdy store ledger, the diary records every day from the fall of 1857 to June 1864. In this abridged version, Jordan reports local news, descriptions of her daily activities, war news, and social life. Orphaned at twelve, Jordan - her first name shortened to 'Rep' by family and friends - lived in bustling New Providence (now part of Clarksville), Tennessee, on the banks of the Red River. Well educated by private tutors, Jordan read widely, followed politics, and was a skilled seamstress interested in the latest fashions.Jordan's descendants worked tirelessly toward ensuring the publication of this diary. In its carefully annotated pages, readers will learn about the years of sectional conflict leading up to the war, the diarist's dizzying array of daily activities, and her attitudes toward those she encountered. Jordan takes a caustic tone toward Union occupiers, whom she accused of 'prancing round on their fine horses.' She routinely refers to the USA as 'Lincolndom' and describes her contempt toward the African Americans in the blue uniforms of the Union army. She seems to have also harbored a bitter resentment toward the 'elites' on the other side of the river in Clarksville. This one-of-a-kind volume not only adds a distinct female voice to the story of the Civil War, but also a unique new picture of the slow but steady disintegration of the 'peculiar institution' of slavery.

The Field of Blood - Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War (Paperback): Joanne B. Freeman The Field of Blood - Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War (Paperback)
Joanne B. Freeman
R419 R359 Discovery Miles 3 590 Save R60 (14%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

In The Field of Blood, Joanne B. Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the U.S. Congress in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions were often punctuated by mortal threats, canings, flipped desks, and all-out slugfests. When debate broke down, congressmen drew pistols and waved Bowie knives. One representative even killed another in a duel. Many were beaten and bullied in an attempt to intimidate them into compliance, particularly on the issue of slavery. These fights didn't happen in a vacuum. Freeman's dramatic accounts of brawls and thrashings tell a larger story of how fisticuffs and journalism, and the powerful emotions they elicited, raised tensions between North and South and led toward war. In the process, she brings the antebellum Congress to life, revealing its rough realities - the feel, sense, and sound of it - as well as its nation-shaping import. The result is riveting - and it reveals fresh understanding of the workings of American democracy and the bonds of Union on the eve of their greatest peril.

John Bankhead Magruder - A Military Reappraisal (Hardcover): Thomas Settles John Bankhead Magruder - A Military Reappraisal (Hardcover)
Thomas Settles
R1,078 Discovery Miles 10 780 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Of all the major figures of the Civil War era, Confederate general John Bankhead Magruder is perhaps the least understood. The third-ranking officer in Virginia's forces behind Robert E. Lee and Joseph E. Johnston, Magruder left no diary, no completed memoirs, no will, not even a family Bible. There are no genealogical records and very few surviving personal papers. Unsurprisingly, then, much existing literature about Magruder contains incorrect information. In John Bankhead Magruder, an exhaustive biography that reflects more than thirty years of painstaking archival research, Thomas M. Settles remedies the many factual inaccuracies surrounding this enigmatic man and his military career.

Settles traces Magruder's family back to its seventeenth-century British American origins, describes his educational endeavors at the University of Virginia and West Point, and details his early military career and his leading role as an artillerist in the war with Mexico. Tall, handsome, and flamboyant, Magruder earned the nickname "Prince John" from his army friends and was known for his impeccable manners and social brilliance. When Virginia seceded in April of 1861, Prince John resigned his commission in the U.S. Army and offered his services to the Confederacy.

Magruder won the opening battle of the Civil War at Big Bethel. Later, in spite of severe shortages of weapons and supplies and a lack of support from Jefferson Davis, Judah P. Benjamin, Samuel Cooper, and Joseph E. Johnston, Prince John, with just 13,600 men, held his position on the Peninsula for a month against George B. McClellan's 105,000-man Federal army. This successful stand, at a time when Richmond was exceedingly vulnerable, provided, according to Settles, John Magruder's greatest contribution to the Confederacy.

Following the Seven Days' battles, however, his commanders harshly criticized Magruder for being too slow at Savage Station, then too rash at Malvern Hill and they transferred him to command the District of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. In Texas, he skillfully recaptured the port of Galveston in early 1863 and held it for the Confederacy until the end of the war. After the war, he joined the Confederate exodus to Mexico but eventually returned to the United States, living in New York City and New Orleans before settling in Houston, where he died on February 18, 1871.

John Bankhead Magruder offers fresh insight into many aspects of the general's life and legacy, including his alleged excesses, his family relationships, and the period between Magruder's death and his memorialization into the canon of Lost Cause mythology. With engaging prose and impressive research, Settles brings this vibrant Civil War figure to life.

Free Delivery
Pinterest Twitter Facebook Google+
You may like...
Petersburg to Appomattox - The End of…
Caroline E. Janney Hardcover R839 Discovery Miles 8 390
Lee's Tigers Revisited - The Louisiana…
Terry L. Jones Hardcover R903 R725 Discovery Miles 7 250
The War for the Common Soldier - How Men…
Peter S. Carmichael Paperback R712 Discovery Miles 7 120
The Civil War and the Transformation of…
Paul D Quigley Hardcover R1,094 Discovery Miles 10 940
Warriors in Mr. Lincoln's Army
Quita V Shier Hardcover R1,026 R848 Discovery Miles 8 480
Civil War Supply and Strategy - Feeding…
Earl J Hess Hardcover R1,158 Discovery Miles 11 580
A Contest of Civilizations - Exposing…
Andrew F Lang Hardcover R890 Discovery Miles 8 900
First Chaplain of the Confederacy…
Katherine Bentley Jeffrey Hardcover R1,010 Discovery Miles 10 100
A John Brown Reader
John Brown, Frederik Douglass, … Paperback R201 R169 Discovery Miles 1 690
The Howling Storm - Weather, Climate…
Kenneth W. Noe Hardcover R1,289 R1,005 Discovery Miles 10 050

 

Partners