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Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Ethnic studies

Faith, Family, and Filipino American Community Life (Paperback, New): Stephen M. Cherry Faith, Family, and Filipino American Community Life (Paperback, New)
Stephen M. Cherry
R812 Discovery Miles 8 120 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

STEPHEN M. CHERRY draws upon a rich set of ethnographic and survey data, collected over a six-year period, to explore the roles that Catholicism and family play in shaping Filipino American community life. From the planning and construction of community centers, to volunteering at health fairs or protesting against abortion, this book illustrates the powerful ways these forces structure and animate not only how first-generation Filipino Americans think and feel about their community, but how they are compelled to engage it over issues deemed important to the sanctity of the family. Revealing more than intimate accounts of Filipino American lives, Cherry offers a glimpse of the often hidden but vital relationship between religion and community in the lives of new immigrants, and allows speculation on the broader impact of Filipino immigration on the nation. The Filipino American community is the second-largest immigrant community in the United States, and the Philippines is the second-largest source of Catholic immigration to this country. This ground-breaking study outlines how first-generation Filipino Americans have the potential to reshape American Catholicism and are already having an impact on American civic life through the engagement of their faith.

Faith, Family, and Filipino American Community Life (Hardcover, New): Stephen M. Cherry Faith, Family, and Filipino American Community Life (Hardcover, New)
Stephen M. Cherry
R2,715 Discovery Miles 27 150 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

STEPHEN M. CHERRY draws upon a rich set of ethnographic and survey data, collected over a six-year period, to explore the roles that Catholicism and family play in shaping Filipino American community life. From the planning and construction of community centers, to volunteering at health fairs or protesting against abortion, this book illustrates the powerful ways these forces structure and animate not only how first-generation Filipino Americans think and feel about their community, but how they are compelled to engage it over issues deemed important to the sanctity of the family. Revealing more than intimate accounts of Filipino American lives, Cherry offers a glimpse of the often hidden but vital relationship between religion and community in the lives of new immigrants, and allows speculation on the broader impact of Filipino immigration on the nation. The Filipino American community is the second-largest immigrant community in the United States, and the Philippines is the second-largest source of Catholic immigration to this country. This ground-breaking study outlines how first-generation Filipino Americans have the potential to reshape American Catholicism and are already having an impact on American civic life through the engagement of their faith.

Being Young, Male and Saudi - Identity and Politics in a Globalized Kingdom (Paperback): Mark C Thompson Being Young, Male and Saudi - Identity and Politics in a Globalized Kingdom (Paperback)
Mark C Thompson
R634 Discovery Miles 6 340 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Although the position of Saudi women within society draws media attention throughout the world, young Saudi men remain part of a silent mass, their thoughts and views rarely heard outside of the Kingdom. Based on primary research across Saudi Arabia with young men from a diverse range of backgrounds, Mark C. Thompson allows for this distinct group of voices to be heard, revealing their opinions and attitudes towards the societal and economic transformations affecting their lives within a gender-segregated society and examining the challenges and dilemmas facing young Saudi men in the twenty-first century. From ideas and beliefs about, identity, education, employment, marriage prospects and gender segregation, as well as political participation and exclusion, this study in turn invites us to reconsider the future of Saudi Arabia as a globalized kingdom.

Black Resonance - Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (Paperback, New): Emily J Lordi Black Resonance - Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (Paperback, New)
Emily J Lordi
R808 Discovery Miles 8 080 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Ever since Bessie Smith's powerful voice conspired with the ""race records" industry to make her a star in the 1920s, African American writers have memorialized the sounds and theorized the politics of black women's singing. In Black Resonance, Emily J. Lordi analyzes writings by Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gayl Jones, and Nikki Giovanni that engage such iconic singers as Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Mahalia Jackson, and Aretha Franklin. Focusing on two generations of artists from the 1920s to the 1970s, Black Resonance reveals a musical-literary tradition in which singers and writers, faced with similar challenges and harboring similar aims, developed comparable expressive techniques. Drawing together such seemingly disparate works as Bessie Smith's blues and Richard Wright's neglected film of Native Son, Mahalia Jackson's gospel music and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, each chapter pairs one writer with one singer to crystallize the artistic practice they share: lyricism, sincerity, understatement, haunting, and the creation of a signature voice. In the process, Lordi demonstrates that popular female singers are not passive muses with raw, natural, or ineffable talent. Rather, they are experimental artists who innovate black expressive possibilities right alongside their literary peers. The first study of black music and literature to centralize the music of black women, Black Resonance offers new ways of reading and hearing some of the twentieth century's most beloved and challenging voices.

Black Resonance - Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (Hardcover, New): Emily J Lordi Black Resonance - Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (Hardcover, New)
Emily J Lordi
R2,731 Discovery Miles 27 310 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Ever since Bessie Smith's powerful voice conspired with the ""race records" industry to make her a star in the 1920s, African American writers have memorialized the sounds and theorized the politics of black women's singing. In Black Resonance, Emily J. Lordi analyzes writings by Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gayl Jones, and Nikki Giovanni that engage such iconic singers as Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Mahalia Jackson, and Aretha Franklin. Focusing on two generations of artists from the 1920s to the 1970s, Black Resonance reveals a musical-literary tradition in which singers and writers, faced with similar challenges and harboring similar aims, developed comparable expressive techniques. Drawing together such seemingly disparate works as Bessie Smith's blues and Richard Wright's neglected film of Native Son, Mahalia Jackson's gospel music and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, each chapter pairs one writer with one singer to crystallize the artistic practice they share: lyricism, sincerity, understatement, haunting, and the creation of a signature voice. In the process, Lordi demonstrates that popular female singers are not passive muses with raw, natural, or ineffable talent. Rather, they are experimental artists who innovate black expressive possibilities right alongside their literary peers. The first study of black music and literature to centralize the music of black women, Black Resonance offers new ways of reading and hearing some of the twentieth century's most beloved and challenging voices.

Claiming Tribal Identity - The Five Tribes and the Politics of Federal Acknowledgment (Paperback, New): Mark Edwin Miller Claiming Tribal Identity - The Five Tribes and the Politics of Federal Acknowledgment (Paperback, New)
Mark Edwin Miller; Foreword by Chad "Corntassel" Smith
R830 Discovery Miles 8 300 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Who counts as an American Indian? Which groups qualify as Indian tribes? These questions have become increasingly complex in the past several decades, and federal legislation and the rise of tribal-owned casinos have raised the stakes in the ongoing debate. In this revealing study, historian Mark Edwin Miller describes how and why dozens of previously unrecognized tribal groups in the southeastern states have sought, and sometimes won, recognition, often to the dismay of the Five Tribes--the Cherokees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Creeks, and Seminoles.
Miller explains how politics, economics, and such slippery issues as tribal and racial identity drive the conflicts between federally recognized tribal entities like the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and other groups such as the Southeastern Cherokee Confederacy that also seek sovereignty. Battles over which groups can claim authentic Indian identity are fought both within the Bureau of Indian Affairs' Federal Acknowledgment Process and in Atlanta, Montgomery, and other capitals where legislators grant state recognition to Indian-identifying enclaves without consulting federally recognized tribes with similar names.
Miller's analysis recognizes the arguments on all sides--both the scholars and activists who see tribal affiliation as an individual choice, and the tribal governments that view unrecognized tribes as fraudulent. Groups such as the Lumbees, the Lower Muscogee Creeks, and the Mowa Choctaws, inspired by the civil rights movement and the War on Poverty, have evolved in surprising ways, as have traditional tribal governments.
Describing the significance of casino gambling, the leader of one unrecognized group said, "It's no longer a matter of red; it's a matter of green." Either a positive or a negative development, depending on who is telling the story, the casinos' economic impact has clouded what were previously issues purely of law, ethics, and justice. Drawing on both documents and personal interviews, Miller unravels the tangled politics of Indian identity and sovereignty. His lively, clearly argued book will be vital reading for tribal leaders, policy makers, and scholars.

Goodness and the Literary Imagination - Harvard's 95th Ingersoll Lecture with Essays on Morrison's Moral and... Goodness and the Literary Imagination - Harvard's 95th Ingersoll Lecture with Essays on Morrison's Moral and Religious Vision (Hardcover)
Toni Morrison; Edited by David Carrasco, Stephanie Paulsell, Mara Willard
R620 R506 Discovery Miles 5 060 Save R114 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

What exactly is goodness? Where is it found in the literary imagination? Toni Morrison, one of American letters' greatest voices, pondered these perplexing questions in her celebrated Ingersoll Lecture, delivered at Harvard University in 2012 and published now for the first time. Perhaps because it is overshadowed by the more easily defined evil, goodness often escapes our attention. Recalling many literary examples, from Ahab to Coetzee's Michael K, Morrison seeks the essence of goodness and ponders its significant place in her writing. She considers the concept in relation to unforgettable characters from her own works of fiction and arrives at conclusions that are both eloquent and edifying. In a lively interview conducted for this book, Morrison further elaborates on her lecture's ideas, discussing goodness not only in literature but in society and history-particularly black history, which has responded to centuries of brutality with profound creativity. Morrison's essay is followed by a Series of responses by scholars in the fields of religion, ethics, history, and literature to her thoughts on goodness and evil, mercy and love, racism and self-destruction, Language and liberation, together with close examination of literary and theoretical expressions from her works. Each of these contributions, written by a scholar of religion, considers the legacy of slavery and how it continues to shape our memories, our complicities, our outcries, our lives, our communities, our literature, and our faith. In addition, the Contributors engage the religious orientation in Morrison's novels so that readers who encounter her many memorable characters such as Sula, Beloved, or Frank Money will learn and appreciate how Morrison's notions of goodness and mercy also reflect her understanding of the sacred and the human spirit.

Modern Spirit - The Art of George Morrison (Paperback): W.Jackson Rushing, Kristin Makholm Modern Spirit - The Art of George Morrison (Paperback)
W.Jackson Rushing, Kristin Makholm; Foreword by Kay Walkingstick
R911 Discovery Miles 9 110 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The work of Chippewa artist George Morrison (1919-2000) has enjoyed widespread critical acclaim. His paintings, drawings, prints, and sculptures have been displayed in numerous public and private exhibitions, and he is one of Minnesota's most cherished artists. Yet because Morrison's artwork typically does not include overt references to his Indian heritage, it has stirred debate about what it means to be a Native American artist. This stunning catalogue, featuring 130 color and black-and-white images, showcases Morrison's work across a spectrum of genres and media, while also exploring the artist's identity as a modernist within the broader context of twentieth-century American and Native American art.
Born and raised near the Grand Portage Indian Reservation in Minnesota, Morrison graduated from the Minnesota School of Art and the Art Students League in New York City. He spent his early career mainly on the East Coast, becoming one of the first Native American artists to exhibit his work extensively in New York. Best known for his landscape paintings and wood collages, he employed a variety of media--paint, wood, ink and metal, paper, and canvas--and developed a unique style that combined elements of cubism, surrealism, and abstract expressionism.
In her foreword to "Modern Spirit, " Cherokee artist Kay WalkingStick describes her personal association with Morrison and admiration for his authentic artistic vision. Kristin Makholm, in her introduction to the volume, explores Morrison's ties to Minnesota and his legacy within the history of Minnesota art and culture. Then, drawing on extensive primary research and Morrison's own writings, W. Jackson Rushing III offers an in-depth analysis of Morrison's artistic evolution against the backdrop of evolving definitions of "Indianness."
By expanding our understanding of Morrison's singular vision, "Modern Spirit" invites readers to appreciate more deeply the beauty and complexity of his art.

Milliken's Bend - A Civil War Battle in History and Memory (Hardcover): Linda Barnickel Milliken's Bend - A Civil War Battle in History and Memory (Hardcover)
Linda Barnickel
R859 R682 Discovery Miles 6 820 Save R177 (21%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

At Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, a Union force composed predominantly of former slaves met their Confederate adversaries in one of the bloodiest small engagements of the war. This important fight received some attention in the North and South but soon drifted into obscurity. In Milliken's Bend, Linda Barnickel uncovers the story of this long-forgotten and highly controversial battle. The fighting at Milliken's Bend occurred in June 1863, about fifteen miles north of Vicksburg on the west bank of the Mississippi River, where a brigade of Texas Confederates attacked a Federal outpost. Most of the Union defenders had been slaves less than two months before. The new African American recruits fought well, despite their minimal training, and Milliken's Bend helped prove to a skeptical northern public that black men were indeed fit for combat duty. Soon after the battle, accusations swirled that Confederates had executed some prisoners taken from the ""Colored Troops."" The charges eventually led to a congressional investigation and contributed to the suspension of prisoner exchanges between the North and South. Barnickel's compelling and comprehensive account of the battle illuminates not only the immense complexity of the events that transpired in northeastern Louisiana during the Vicksburg Campaign but also the implications of Milliken's Bend upon the war as a whole. The battle contributed to southerner's increasing fears of slave insurrection and heightened their anxieties about emancipation. In the North, it helped foster a commitment to allow free blacks and former slaves to take part in the war to end slavery. And for African Americans, both free and enslaved, Milliken's Bend symbolized their never-ending struggle for freedom.

Race and the Chilean Miracle - Neoliberalism, Democracy, and Indigenous Rights (Paperback): Patricia Lynne Richards Race and the Chilean Miracle - Neoliberalism, Democracy, and Indigenous Rights (Paperback)
Patricia Lynne Richards
R822 Discovery Miles 8 220 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The economic reforms imposed by Augusto Pinochet's regime (1973-1990) are often credited with transforming Chile into a global economy and setting the stage for a peaceful transition to democracy, individual liberty, and the recognition of cultural diversity. The famed economist Milton Friedman would later describe the transition as the "Miracle of Chile." Yet, as Patricia Richards reveals, beneath this veneer of progress lies a reality of social conflict and inequity that has been perpetuated by many of the same neoliberal programs.
In "Race and the Chilean Miracle, "Richards examines conflicts between Mapuche indigenous people and state and private actors over natural resources, territorial claims, and collective rights in the Araucania region. Through ground-level fieldwork, extensive interviews with local Mapuche and Chileans, and analysis of contemporary race and governance theory, Richards exposes the ways that local, regional, and transnational realities are shaped by systemic racism in the context of neoliberal multiculturalism..
Richards demonstrates how state programs and policies run counter to Mapuche claims for autonomy and cultural recognition. The Mapuche, whose ancestral lands have been appropriated for timber and farming, have been branded as terrorists for their activism and sometimes-violent responses to state and private sector interventions. Through their interviews, many Mapuche cite the perpetuation of colonialism under the guise of development projects, multicultural policies, and assimilationist narratives. Many Chilean locals and political elites see the continued defiance of the Mapuche in their tenacious connection to the land, resistance to integration, and insistence on their rights as a people. These diametrically opposed worldviews form the basis of the racial dichotomy that continues to pervade Chilean society.
In her study, Richards traces systemic racism that follows both a top-down path (global, state, and regional) as well as a bottom-up one (local agencies and actors), detailing their historic roots. Richards also describes potential positive outcomes in the form of intercultural coalitions or indigenous autonomy. Her compelling analysis offers new perspectives on indigenous rights, race, and neoliberal multiculturalism in Latin America and globally.

Chicago Race Riots: July, 1919 (Paperback): Sandburg Chicago Race Riots: July, 1919 (Paperback)
Sandburg
R192 R159 Discovery Miles 1 590 Save R33 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Nearly a century ago, the segregation-related death of an African-American teenager at a Chicago beach set off days of violence. Contemporary account by distinguished author, who reported for local newspaper.

Is Multiculturalism Dead? - Crisis and Persistence in the Constitutional State (Paperback): Christian Joppke Is Multiculturalism Dead? - Crisis and Persistence in the Constitutional State (Paperback)
Christian Joppke
R457 Discovery Miles 4 570 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Multiculturalism is controversial in the liberal state and has frequently been declared dead, even in countries that have never had a policy under that name. This authoritative book reviews the different meanings multiculturalism has acquired across theories, countries, and domains to evaluate the extent of its demise and the ways in which it lives on. Christian Joppke intriguingly argues that, beyond the ebb and flow of policy, liberal constitutionalism itself bears out a multiculturalism of the individual that is not only alive but necessary in a liberal society. Through a provocative comparison of gay rights in the United States and the accommodation of Islam in Europe, he shows that liberal constitutionalism constrains majority power, requiring the state to be neutral about people's values and ethical commitment. It cannot but give rise to multiple ways of life or cultures, as people are endowed with the freedom to embrace them. Accordingly, impulses toward multiculturalism persist, despite its political crisis, but with a new accent on the individual, rather than group, as the unit of integration. Tightly argued and clearly written, this book provides a judicious assessment of multiculturalism in the West and will be of interest to a broad readership across the social sciences and legal studies.

The Indianization of Lewis and Clark (Hardcover, Volume Set): William R Swagerty The Indianization of Lewis and Clark (Hardcover, Volume Set)
William R Swagerty
R2,375 Discovery Miles 23 750 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Although some have attributed the success of the Lewis and Clark expedition primarily to gunpowder and gumption, historian William R. Swagerty demonstrates in this two-volume set that adopting Indian ways of procuring, processing, and transporting food and gear was crucial to the survival of the Corps of Discovery. "The Indianization of Lewis and Clark "retraces the well-known trail of America's most famous explorers as a journey into the heart of Native America--a case study of successful material adaptation and cultural borrowing.Beginning with a broad examination of regional demographics and folkways, Swagerty describes the cultural baggage and material preferences the expedition carried west in 1804. Detailing this baseline reveals which Indian influences were already part of Jeffersonian American culture, and which were progressive adaptations the Corpsmen made of Indian ways in the course of their journey. Swagerty's exhaustive research offers detailed information on both Indian and Euro-American science, medicine, cartography, and cuisine, and on a wide range of technologies and material culture. Readers learn what the Corpsmen wore, what they ate, how they traveled, and where they slept (and with whom) before, during, and after the return.

Indianization is as old as contact experiences between Native Americans and Europeans. Lewis and Clark took the process to a new level, accepting the hospitality of dozens of Native groups as they sought a navigable water route to the Pacific. This richly illustrated, interdisciplinary study provides a unique and complex portrait of the material and cultural legacy of Indian America, offering readers perspective on lessons learned but largely forgotten in the aftermath of the epic journey.

Mound Builders and Monument Makers of the Northern Great Lakes, 1200-1600 (Hardcover): Meghan C L Howey Mound Builders and Monument Makers of the Northern Great Lakes, 1200-1600 (Hardcover)
Meghan C L Howey
R830 Discovery Miles 8 300 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Rising above the northern Michigan landscape, prehistoric burial mounds and impressive circular earthen enclosures bear witness to the deep history of the region's ancient indigenous peoples. These mounds and earthworks have long been treated as isolated finds and have never been connected to the social dynamics of the time in which they were constructed, a period called Late Prehistory.
In "Mound Builders and Monument Makers of the Northern Great Lakes, 1200-1600, " Meghan C. L. Howey uses archaeology to make this connection. She shows how indigenous communities of the northern Great Lakes used earthen structures as gathering places for ritual and social interaction, which maintained connected egalitarian societies in the process.
Examining "every available ceramic sherd from every northern earthwork," Howey combines regional archaeological investigations with ethnohistory, analysis of spatial relationships, and collaboration with tribal communities to explore changes in the area's social setting from 1200 to 1600. During this time, cultural shifts, such as the adoption of maize horticulture, led to the creation of the earthen constructions. Burial mounds were erected, marking claims to resources and defining areas for local ritual gatherings, while massive circular enclosures were constructed as intersocietal ceremonial centers. Together, Howey shows, these structures made up part of an interconnected, purposefully designed cultural landscape. When societies incorporated the earthworks into their egalitarian social and ritual behaviors, the structures became something more: ceremonial "monuments."
The first systematic examination of earthen constructions in what is today Michigan, "Mound Builders and Monument Makers of the Northern Great Lakes, 1200-1600 "reveals complicated indigenous histories that played out in the area before European contact. Howey's richly illustrated investigation increases our understanding of the diverse cultures and dynamic histories of the pre-Columbian ancestors of today's Great Lake tribes.

Unworthy Republic - The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory (Hardcover): Claudio Saunt Unworthy Republic - The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory (Hardcover)
Claudio Saunt
R628 R520 Discovery Miles 5 200 Save R108 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In May 1830, the United States formally launched a policy to expel Native Americans from the East to territories west of the Mississippi River. Justified as a humanitarian enterprise, the undertaking was to be systematic and rational, overseen by Washington's small but growing bureaucracy. But as the policy unfolded over the next decade, thousands of Native Americans died under the federal government's auspices, and thousands of others lost their possessions and homelands in an orgy of fraud, intimidation, and violence. Unworthy Republic reveals how expulsion became national policy and describes the chaotic and deadly results of the operation to deport 80,000 men, women, and children. Drawing on firsthand accounts and the voluminous records produced by the federal government, Saunt's deeply researched book argues that Indian Removal, as advocates of the policy called it, was not an inevitable chapter in U.S. expansion across the continent. Rather, it was a fiercely contested political act designed to secure new lands for the expansion of slavery and to consolidate the power of the southern states. Indigenous peoples fought relentlessly against the policy, while many U.S. citizens insisted that it was a betrayal of the nation's values. When Congress passed the act by a razor-thin margin, it authorized one of the first state-sponsored mass deportations in the modern era, marking a turning point for native peoples and for the United States. In telling this gripping story, Saunt shows how the politics and economics of white supremacy lay at the heart of the expulsion of Native Americans; how corruption, greed, and administrative indifference and incompetence contributed to the debacle of its implementation; and how the consequences still resonate today.

Vanguard - How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All (Hardcover): Martha S. Jones Vanguard - How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All (Hardcover)
Martha S. Jones
R782 R658 Discovery Miles 6 580 Save R124 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Activism and the American Novel - Religion and Resistance in Fiction by Women of Color (Paperback): Romero Activism and the American Novel - Religion and Resistance in Fiction by Women of Color (Paperback)
Romero
R661 Discovery Miles 6 610 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Since the 1980s, many activists and writers have turned from identity politics toward ethnic religious traditions to rediscover and reinvigorate their historic role in resistance to colonialism and oppression. In her examination of contemporary fiction by women of color--including Toni Morrison, Ana Castillo, Toni Cade Bambara, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko--Channette Romero considers the way these novels newly engage with Vodun, Santeria, Candomble, and American Indian traditions. Critical of a widespread disengagement from civic participation and of the contemporary novel's disconnection from politics, this fiction attempts to transform the novel and the practice of reading into a means of political engagement and an inspiration for social change.

We Are in This Dance Together - Gender, Power and Globalization at a Mexican Garment Firm (Paperback, New): Nancy Plankey-Videla We Are in This Dance Together - Gender, Power and Globalization at a Mexican Garment Firm (Paperback, New)
Nancy Plankey-Videla
R761 Discovery Miles 7 610 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Changes in the global economy have real and contradictory outcomes for the everyday lives of women workers. In 2001, Nancy Plankey-Videla had a rare opportunity to witness these effects firsthand. Having secured access to one of Latin America's top producers of high-end men's suits in Mexico for participant-observer research, she labored as a machine operator for nine months on a shop floor made up of predominantly of women. The firm had recently transformed itself from traditional assembly to lean, cutting-edge, Japanese-style production methods. Lured initially into the firm by way of increased wages and benefits, workers had helped shoulder the company's increasing debts. When the company's plan for successful expansion went awry and it reneged on promises it made to the workforce, women workers responded by walking out on strike on March 15, 2001. Building upon in-depth interviews with over sixty workers, managers, and policy makers, Plankey-Videla documents and analyzes events leading up to the female-led factory strike and its aftermath-including harassment from managers, corrupt union officials and labor authorities, and violent governor-sanctioned police actions. We Are in This Dance Together illustrates how the women's shared identity as workers and mothers-deserving of dignity, respect, and a living wage-became the basis for radicalization and led to further civic organizing against the state, the company, and the corrupt union to demand justice.

Hagar's Daughter - A Tale of Southern Caste Prejudice (Paperback): Pauline Hopkins Hagar's Daughter - A Tale of Southern Caste Prejudice (Paperback)
Pauline Hopkins; Edited by John Gruesser, Alisha Knight
R501 Discovery Miles 5 010 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Hagar's Daughter is Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins's first serial novel, published in the Boston-based Colored American Magazine (1901-1902). The novel itself features concealed and mistaken identities, dramatic revelations, and extraordinary plot twists. In Part 1, Maryland plantation heirs Hagar Sargeant and Ellis Enson fall in love, marry, and have a daughter. However, Ellis's covetous younger brother, St. Clair, claims that Hagar is of mixed-race ancestry, putting her and her infant in peril. When Ellis is presumed to be dead, St. Clair sells Hagar and her child into slavery, and they presumably die when Hagar, in despair, leaps into the Potomac River with her daughter. This is the backdrop for Part 2 (set twenty years later), which includes a high-profile murder trial, an abduction plot, and a steady succession of surprises as the young Black maid Venus Johnson assumes male clothing to solve a series of mysteries that are both current and decades-old. The appendices to this Broadview edition feature advertising for the original publication, other writing by Hopkins and her contemporaries, and reviews that situate the work within the popular literature and political culture of its time.

American Indians and the Mass Media (Paperback, New): Meta G. Carstarphen, John P. Sanchez American Indians and the Mass Media (Paperback, New)
Meta G. Carstarphen, John P. Sanchez
R673 Discovery Miles 6 730 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Mention "American Indian," and the first image that comes to most people's minds is likely to be a figment of the American mass media: A war-bonneted chief. The Land O' Lakes maiden. Most American Indians in the twenty-first century live in urban areas, so why do the mass media still rely on Indian imagery stuck in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? How can more accurate views of contemporary Indian cultures replace such stereotypes? These and similar questions ground the essays collected in "American Indians and the Mass Media, " which explores Native experience and the mainstream media's impact on American Indian histories, cultures, and communities.

Chronicling milestones in the relationship between Indians and the media, some of the chapters employ a historical perspective, and others focus on contemporary practices and new technologies. All foreground American Indian perspectives missing in other books on mass communication. The historical studies examine treatment of Indians in America's first newspaper, published in seventeenth-century Boston, and in early Cherokee newspapers; "Life" magazine's depictions of Indians, including the famous photograph of Ira Hayes raising the flag at Iwo Jima; and the syndicated feature stories of Elmo Scott Watson. Among the chapters on more contemporary issues, one discusses campaigns to change offensive place-names and sports team mascots, and another looks at recent movies such as "Smoke Signals" and television programs that are gradually overturning the "movie Indian" stereotypes of the twentieth century.

Particularly valuable are the essays highlighting authentic tribal voices in current and future media. Mark Trahant chronicles the formation of the Native American Journalists Association, perhaps the most important early Indian advocacy organization, which he helped found. As the contributions on new media point out, American Indians with access to a computer can tell their own stories--instantly to millions of people--making social networking and other Internet tools effective means for combating stereotypes.

Including discussion questions for each essay and an extensive bibliography, "American Indians and the Mass Media" is a unique educational resource.

An American Sunrise - Poems (Paperback): Joy Harjo An American Sunrise - Poems (Paperback)
Joy Harjo
R326 Discovery Miles 3 260 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

In the early 1800s, the Mvskoke people were forcibly removed from their original lands east of the Mississippi to Indian Territory, which is now part of Oklahoma. Two hundred years later, Joy Harjo returns to her family's lands and opens a dialogue with history. In An American Sunrise, Harjo finds blessings in the abundance of her homeland and confronts the site where her people, and other indigenous families, essentially disappeared. From her memory of her mother's death, to her beginnings in the native rights movement, to the fresh road with her beloved, Harjo's personal life intertwines with tribal histories to create a space for renewed beginnings. Her poems sing of beauty and survival, illuminating a spirituality that connects her to her ancestors and thrums with the quiet anger of living in the ruins of injustice. A descendent of storytellers and "one of our finest-and most complicated-poets" (Los Angeles Review of Books), Joy Harjo continues her legacy with this latest powerful collection.

Iroquois Art, Power, and History (Hardcover): Neal B Keating Iroquois Art, Power, and History (Hardcover)
Neal B Keating
R1,477 Discovery Miles 14 770 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In this richly illustrated book, Neal B. Keating explores Iroquois visual expression through more than five thousand years, from its emergence in ancient North America into the early twenty-first century. Drawing on extensive archival research and fieldwork with Iroquois artists and communities, Keating foregrounds the voices and visions of Iroquois peoples, revealing how they have continuously used visual expression to adapt creatively to shifting political and economic environments.

Iroquois, or Haudenosaunee, peoples have long been the subjects of Western study. From the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, European and Euro- American writers classified Iroquois works not as art but as culturally lower forms of expression. During the twentieth century, Western critics commonly rejected contemporary Native art both as art and as an "inauthentic" expression of Indianness. Keating exposes the false assumptions underlying these perceptions. Approaching his subject from the perspective of an anthropologist, he focuses on the social relations and processes that are indexed by Iroquois visual culture through time, and he shows how Iroquois images are deployed in colonized contexts.

As he traces the history of Iroquois art practice, Keating seeks a middle road between ethnohistorical approaches and the activist perspectives of contemporaryartists. He is one of the first scholars in Iroquois studies to emphasize painting, a popular art form among present-day Iroquois. He conceptualizes painting broadly, to include writing, incising, drawing, tattoo, body painting, photography, videography, and digital media. Featuring more than 100 color and black-and-white reproductions, this volume embraces a wide array of artworks in diverse media, prompting new appreciation--and deeper understanding--of Iroquois art and its historical and contemporary significance.

Phenemes, Graphemes and Democracy - The Significance of Accuracy in the Orthographical Development of IsiXhosa (Paperback):... Phenemes, Graphemes and Democracy - The Significance of Accuracy in the Orthographical Development of IsiXhosa (Paperback)
Zandisile W. Saul, Rudolph Botha
R225 R186 Discovery Miles 1 860 Save R39 (17%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

The period 1823 to the present was an important phase in the standardisation of isiXhosa orthography. The early pioneers of a written form of isiXhosa experienced significant challenges in reducing this African language to writing, since there was no reference material other than that designed for the European languages. Over the years, the development of isiXhosa orthography has progressed considerably. However, various inconsistencies and anomalies remain that require the attention of African language specialists. This book provides comprehensive guidelines on important aspects of isiXhosa orthography such as word division, spelling and capitalisation. However, the authors' primary focus has been those challenging areas of standardisation which have not yet been attended to. This work will make an important contribution to the development of isiXhosa into a fully functional medium of teaching and learning in Higher Education, and facilitate the enhancement of its status as one of South Africa's official languages.

Violent Encounters - Interviews on Western Massacres (Hardcover): Deborah Lawrence, Jon Lawrence Violent Encounters - Interviews on Western Massacres (Hardcover)
Deborah Lawrence, Jon Lawrence
R702 Discovery Miles 7 020 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Merciless killing in the nineteenth-century American West, as this unusual book shows, was not as simple as depicted in dime novels and movie Westerns. The scholars interviewed here, experts on violence in the West, embrace a wide range of approaches and perspectives and challenge both traditional views of western expansion and politically correct ideologies.

The Battle of the Little Big Horn, the Sand Creek Massacre, the Battle of the Washita, and the Mountain Meadows Massacre are iconic events that have been repeatedly described and analyzed, but the interviews included in this volume offer new points of view. Other events discussed here are little-known today, such as the Camp Grant Massacre, in which Anglo-Americans, Mexican Americans, and Tohono O'odham Indians killed more than a hundred Pinal and Aravaipa Apache men, women, and children.

In addition to specific events, the interviews cover broader themes such as violence in early California; hostilities between the frontier army and the Sioux, including the Santee Sioux Revolt and Wounded Knee; and violence between European Americans and Great Basin tribes, such as the Bear River Massacre. The scholars interviewed include academic historians, public historians, an anthropologist, and a journalist. The interview format provides insights into the methodology and tools of historical research and allows questions and speculations often absent from conventional, written accounts. The scholars share their latest thoughts on long-standing controversies, address the political uses often made of history, and discuss the need to incorporate multiple viewpoints.

Scholars and students of history and historiography will be fascinated by the nuts-and-bolts information about the practice of history revealed in these interviews. In addition, readers with specific interests in the events discussed will gain much new information and many fresh insights.

The Selected Works of Audre Lorde (Paperback): Audre Lorde The Selected Works of Audre Lorde (Paperback)
Audre Lorde; Edited by Roxane Gay; Introduction by Roxane Gay
R381 R320 Discovery Miles 3 200 Save R61 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Self-described "black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet" Audre Lorde is an unforgettable voice in twentieth-century literature, and one of the first to center the experiences of black, queer women. This essential reader showcases her indelible contributions to intersectional feminism, queer theory, and critical race studies in twelve landmark essays and more than sixty poems-selected and introduced by one of our most powerful contemporary voices on race and gender, Roxane Gay. Among the essays included here are: "The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action" "The Master's Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House" "I Am Your Sister" Excerpts from the American Book Award-winning A Burst of Light The poems are drawn from Lorde's nine volumes, including The Black Unicorn and National Book Award finalist From a Land Where Other People Live. Among them are: "Martha" "A Litany for Survival" "Sister Outsider" "Making Love to Concrete"

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