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Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Ethnic studies

Divining (Paperback): Brooke Sahni Divining (Paperback)
Brooke Sahni
R272 R218 Discovery Miles 2 180 Save R54 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Warrior Nations - The United States and Indian Peoples (Paperback, New): Roger L. Nichols Warrior Nations - The United States and Indian Peoples (Paperback, New)
Roger L. Nichols
R644 Discovery Miles 6 440 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

During the century following George Washington's presidency, the United States fought at least forty wars with various Indian tribes, averaging one conflict every two and a half years. "Warrior Nations "is Roger L. Nichols's response to the question, "Why did so much fighting take place?" Examining eight of the wars between the 1780s and 1877, Nichols explains what started each conflict and what the eight had in common as well as how they differed. He writes about the fights between the United States and the Shawnee, Miami, and Delaware tribes in the Ohio Valley, the Creek in Alabama, the Arikara in South Dakota, the Sauk and Fox in Illinois and Wisconsin, the Dakota Sioux in Minnesota, the Cheyenne and Arapaho in Colorado, the Apache in New Mexico and Arizona, and the Nez Perce in Oregon and Idaho.
Virtually all of these wars, Nichols shows, grew out of small-scale local conflicts, suggesting that interracial violence preceded any formal declaration of war. American pioneers hated and feared Indians and wanted their land. Indian villages were armed camps, and their young men sought recognition for bravery and prowess in hunting and fighting. Neither the U.S. government nor tribal leaders could prevent raids, thievery, and violence when the two groups met.
In addition to U.S. territorial expansion and the belligerence of racist pioneers, Nichols cites a variety of factors that led to individual wars: cultural differences, border disputes, conflicts between and within tribes, the actions of white traders and local politicians, the government's failure to prevent or punish anti-Indian violence, and Native determination to retain their lands, traditional culture, and tribal independence.
The conflicts examined here, Nichols argues, need to be considered as wars of U.S. aggression, a central feature of that nation's expansion across the continent that brought newcomers into areas occupied by highly militarized Native communities ready and able to defend themselves and attack their enemies.

Black Resonance - Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (Paperback, New): Emily J Lordi Black Resonance - Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (Paperback, New)
Emily J Lordi
R878 Discovery Miles 8 780 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Ever since Bessie Smith's powerful voice conspired with the ""race records" industry to make her a star in the 1920s, African American writers have memorialized the sounds and theorized the politics of black women's singing. In Black Resonance, Emily J. Lordi analyzes writings by Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gayl Jones, and Nikki Giovanni that engage such iconic singers as Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Mahalia Jackson, and Aretha Franklin. Focusing on two generations of artists from the 1920s to the 1970s, Black Resonance reveals a musical-literary tradition in which singers and writers, faced with similar challenges and harboring similar aims, developed comparable expressive techniques. Drawing together such seemingly disparate works as Bessie Smith's blues and Richard Wright's neglected film of Native Son, Mahalia Jackson's gospel music and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, each chapter pairs one writer with one singer to crystallize the artistic practice they share: lyricism, sincerity, understatement, haunting, and the creation of a signature voice. In the process, Lordi demonstrates that popular female singers are not passive muses with raw, natural, or ineffable talent. Rather, they are experimental artists who innovate black expressive possibilities right alongside their literary peers. The first study of black music and literature to centralize the music of black women, Black Resonance offers new ways of reading and hearing some of the twentieth century's most beloved and challenging voices.

Black Resonance - Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (Hardcover, New): Emily J Lordi Black Resonance - Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (Hardcover, New)
Emily J Lordi
R3,078 Discovery Miles 30 780 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Ever since Bessie Smith's powerful voice conspired with the ""race records" industry to make her a star in the 1920s, African American writers have memorialized the sounds and theorized the politics of black women's singing. In Black Resonance, Emily J. Lordi analyzes writings by Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gayl Jones, and Nikki Giovanni that engage such iconic singers as Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Mahalia Jackson, and Aretha Franklin. Focusing on two generations of artists from the 1920s to the 1970s, Black Resonance reveals a musical-literary tradition in which singers and writers, faced with similar challenges and harboring similar aims, developed comparable expressive techniques. Drawing together such seemingly disparate works as Bessie Smith's blues and Richard Wright's neglected film of Native Son, Mahalia Jackson's gospel music and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, each chapter pairs one writer with one singer to crystallize the artistic practice they share: lyricism, sincerity, understatement, haunting, and the creation of a signature voice. In the process, Lordi demonstrates that popular female singers are not passive muses with raw, natural, or ineffable talent. Rather, they are experimental artists who innovate black expressive possibilities right alongside their literary peers. The first study of black music and literature to centralize the music of black women, Black Resonance offers new ways of reading and hearing some of the twentieth century's most beloved and challenging voices.

The [black] America's Handbook for the Survival through the 21st Century - The Forgotten Truth about Racism, Vol.1 Final... The [black] America's Handbook for the Survival through the 21st Century - The Forgotten Truth about Racism, Vol.1 Final Edition (Hardcover, 2nd ed.)
Radine America; Edited by Stephanie Dove
R924 Discovery Miles 9 240 Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Claiming Tribal Identity - The Five Tribes and the Politics of Federal Acknowledgment (Paperback, New): Mark Edwin Miller Claiming Tribal Identity - The Five Tribes and the Politics of Federal Acknowledgment (Paperback, New)
Mark Edwin Miller; Foreword by Chad "Corntassel" Smith
R881 Discovery Miles 8 810 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Who counts as an American Indian? Which groups qualify as Indian tribes? These questions have become increasingly complex in the past several decades, and federal legislation and the rise of tribal-owned casinos have raised the stakes in the ongoing debate. In this revealing study, historian Mark Edwin Miller describes how and why dozens of previously unrecognized tribal groups in the southeastern states have sought, and sometimes won, recognition, often to the dismay of the Five Tribes--the Cherokees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Creeks, and Seminoles.
Miller explains how politics, economics, and such slippery issues as tribal and racial identity drive the conflicts between federally recognized tribal entities like the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and other groups such as the Southeastern Cherokee Confederacy that also seek sovereignty. Battles over which groups can claim authentic Indian identity are fought both within the Bureau of Indian Affairs' Federal Acknowledgment Process and in Atlanta, Montgomery, and other capitals where legislators grant state recognition to Indian-identifying enclaves without consulting federally recognized tribes with similar names.
Miller's analysis recognizes the arguments on all sides--both the scholars and activists who see tribal affiliation as an individual choice, and the tribal governments that view unrecognized tribes as fraudulent. Groups such as the Lumbees, the Lower Muscogee Creeks, and the Mowa Choctaws, inspired by the civil rights movement and the War on Poverty, have evolved in surprising ways, as have traditional tribal governments.
Describing the significance of casino gambling, the leader of one unrecognized group said, "It's no longer a matter of red; it's a matter of green." Either a positive or a negative development, depending on who is telling the story, the casinos' economic impact has clouded what were previously issues purely of law, ethics, and justice. Drawing on both documents and personal interviews, Miller unravels the tangled politics of Indian identity and sovereignty. His lively, clearly argued book will be vital reading for tribal leaders, policy makers, and scholars.

Modern Spirit - The Art of George Morrison (Paperback): W.Jackson Rushing, Kristin Makholm Modern Spirit - The Art of George Morrison (Paperback)
W.Jackson Rushing, Kristin Makholm; Foreword by Kay Walkingstick
R925 Discovery Miles 9 250 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The work of Chippewa artist George Morrison (1919-2000) has enjoyed widespread critical acclaim. His paintings, drawings, prints, and sculptures have been displayed in numerous public and private exhibitions, and he is one of Minnesota's most cherished artists. Yet because Morrison's artwork typically does not include overt references to his Indian heritage, it has stirred debate about what it means to be a Native American artist. This stunning catalogue, featuring 130 color and black-and-white images, showcases Morrison's work across a spectrum of genres and media, while also exploring the artist's identity as a modernist within the broader context of twentieth-century American and Native American art.
Born and raised near the Grand Portage Indian Reservation in Minnesota, Morrison graduated from the Minnesota School of Art and the Art Students League in New York City. He spent his early career mainly on the East Coast, becoming one of the first Native American artists to exhibit his work extensively in New York. Best known for his landscape paintings and wood collages, he employed a variety of media--paint, wood, ink and metal, paper, and canvas--and developed a unique style that combined elements of cubism, surrealism, and abstract expressionism.
In her foreword to "Modern Spirit, " Cherokee artist Kay WalkingStick describes her personal association with Morrison and admiration for his authentic artistic vision. Kristin Makholm, in her introduction to the volume, explores Morrison's ties to Minnesota and his legacy within the history of Minnesota art and culture. Then, drawing on extensive primary research and Morrison's own writings, W. Jackson Rushing III offers an in-depth analysis of Morrison's artistic evolution against the backdrop of evolving definitions of "Indianness."
By expanding our understanding of Morrison's singular vision, "Modern Spirit" invites readers to appreciate more deeply the beauty and complexity of his art.

For Joshua - An Ojibwe Father Teaches His Son (Hardcover): Richard Wagamese For Joshua - An Ojibwe Father Teaches His Son (Hardcover)
Richard Wagamese
R555 R443 Discovery Miles 4 430 Save R112 (20%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

"We may not relight the fires that used to burn in our villages, but we can carry the embers from those fires in our hearts and learn to light new fires in a new world." Ojibwe tradition calls for fathers to walk their children through the world, sharing the ancient understanding "that we are all, animate and inanimate alike, living on the one pure breath with which the Creator gave life to the Universe." In this intimate series of letters to the six-year-old son from whom he was estranged, Richard Wagamese fulfills this traditional duty with grace and humility, describing his own path through life-separation from his family as a boy, substance abuse, incarceration, and ultimately the discovery of books and writing-and braiding this extraordinary story with the teachings of his people, in which animals were the teachers of human beings, until greed and a desire to control the more-than-human world led to anger, fear, and, eventually, profound alienation. At once a deeply moving memoir and a fascinating elucidation of a rich indigenous cosmology, For Joshua is an unforgettable journey.

A History of My Brief Body (Paperback): Billy-Ray Belcourt A History of My Brief Body (Paperback)
Billy-Ray Belcourt
R369 R298 Discovery Miles 2 980 Save R71 (19%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Original Classic) - An American Slave (Paperback): Frederick Douglass Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Original Classic) - An American Slave (Paperback)
Frederick Douglass
R300 R242 Discovery Miles 2 420 Save R58 (19%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Milliken's Bend - A Civil War Battle in History and Memory (Hardcover): Linda Barnickel Milliken's Bend - A Civil War Battle in History and Memory (Hardcover)
Linda Barnickel
R928 R718 Discovery Miles 7 180 Save R210 (23%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

At Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, a Union force composed predominantly of former slaves met their Confederate adversaries in one of the bloodiest small engagements of the war. This important fight received some attention in the North and South but soon drifted into obscurity. In Milliken's Bend, Linda Barnickel uncovers the story of this long-forgotten and highly controversial battle. The fighting at Milliken's Bend occurred in June 1863, about fifteen miles north of Vicksburg on the west bank of the Mississippi River, where a brigade of Texas Confederates attacked a Federal outpost. Most of the Union defenders had been slaves less than two months before. The new African American recruits fought well, despite their minimal training, and Milliken's Bend helped prove to a skeptical northern public that black men were indeed fit for combat duty. Soon after the battle, accusations swirled that Confederates had executed some prisoners taken from the ""Colored Troops."" The charges eventually led to a congressional investigation and contributed to the suspension of prisoner exchanges between the North and South. Barnickel's compelling and comprehensive account of the battle illuminates not only the immense complexity of the events that transpired in northeastern Louisiana during the Vicksburg Campaign but also the implications of Milliken's Bend upon the war as a whole. The battle contributed to southerner's increasing fears of slave insurrection and heightened their anxieties about emancipation. In the North, it helped foster a commitment to allow free blacks and former slaves to take part in the war to end slavery. And for African Americans, both free and enslaved, Milliken's Bend symbolized their never-ending struggle for freedom.

The Worst Passions of Human Nature - White Supremacy in the Civil War North (Hardcover): Paul D Escott The Worst Passions of Human Nature - White Supremacy in the Civil War North (Hardcover)
Paul D Escott
R691 R543 Discovery Miles 5 430 Save R148 (21%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The American North's commitment to preventing a southern secession rooted in slaveholding suggests a society united in its opposition to slavery and racial inequality. The reality, however, was far more complex and troubling. In his latest book, Paul Escott lays bare the contrast between progress on emancipation and the persistence of white supremacy in the Civil War North. Escott analyzes northern politics, as well as the racial attitudes revealed in the era's literature, to expose the nearly ubiquitous racism that flourished in all of American society and culture. Contradicting much recent scholarship, Escott argues that the North's Democratic Party was consciously and avowedly "the white man's party," as an extensive examination of Democratic newspapers, as well as congressional debates and other speeches by Democratic leaders, proves. The Republican Party, meanwhile, defended emancipation as a war measure but did little to attack racism or fight for equal rights. Most Republicans propagated a message that emancipation would not disturb northern race relations or the interests of northern white voters: freed slaves, it was felt, would either leave the nation or remain in the South as subordinate laborers. Escott's book uncovers the substantial and destructive racism that lay beyond the South's borders. Despite emancipation representing enormous progress, racism flourished in the North, and assumptions of white supremacy remained powerful and nearly ubiquitous throughout America.

This Tender Land - A Novel (Paperback): William Kent Krueger This Tender Land - A Novel (Paperback)
William Kent Krueger
R403 R329 Discovery Miles 3 290 Save R74 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

1932, Minnesota-the Lincoln School is a pitiless place where hundreds of Native American children, forcibly separated from their parents, are sent to be educated. It is also home to an orphan named Odie O'Banion, a lively boy whose exploits earn him the superintendent's wrath. Forced to flee, he and his brother Albert, their best friend Mose, and a brokenhearted little girl named Emmy steal away in a canoe, heading for the mighty Mississippi and a place to call their own. Over the course of one unforgettable summer, these four orphans will fly into the unknown and cross paths with others who are adrift, from struggling farmers and traveling faith healers to displaced families and lost souls of all kinds. With the feel of a modern classic, This Tender Land is an en thralling, big-hearted epic.

Through a Native Lens - American Indian Photography (Hardcover): Nicole Strathman Through a Native Lens - American Indian Photography (Hardcover)
Nicole Strathman
R1,175 R904 Discovery Miles 9 040 Save R271 (23%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

What is American Indian photography? At the turn of the twentieth century, Edward Curtis began creating romantic images of American Indians, and his works - along with pictures by other non-Native photographers - came to define the field. Yet beginning in the second half of the nineteenth century, American Indians themselves started using cameras to record their daily activities and to memorialize tribal members. Through a Native Lens offers a refreshing, new perspective by highlighting the active contributions of North American Indians, both as patrons who commissioned portraits and as photographers who created collections. In this richly illustrated volume, Nicole Dawn Strathman explores how indigenous peoples throughout the United States and Canada appropriated the art of photography and integrated it into their lifeways. The photographs she analyzes date to the first one hundred years of the medium, between 1840 and 1940. To account for Native activity both in front of and behind the camera, the author divides her survey into two parts. Part I focuses on Native participants, including such public figures as Sarah Winnemucca and Red Cloud, who fashioned themselves in deliberate ways for their portraits. Part II examines Native professional, semiprofessional, and amateur photographers. Drawing from tribal and state archives, libraries, museums, and individual collections, Through a Native Lens features photographs - including some never before published - that range from formal portraits to casual snapshots. The images represent multiple tribal communities across Native North America, including the Inland Tlingit, Northern Paiute, and Kiowa. Moving beyond studies of Native Americans as photographic subjects, this groundbreaking book demonstrates how indigenous peoples took control of their own images and distinguished themselves as pioneers of photography.

The Indianization of Lewis and Clark (Hardcover, Volume Set): William R Swagerty The Indianization of Lewis and Clark (Hardcover, Volume Set)
William R Swagerty
R2,552 Discovery Miles 25 520 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Although some have attributed the success of the Lewis and Clark expedition primarily to gunpowder and gumption, historian William R. Swagerty demonstrates in this two-volume set that adopting Indian ways of procuring, processing, and transporting food and gear was crucial to the survival of the Corps of Discovery. "The Indianization of Lewis and Clark "retraces the well-known trail of America's most famous explorers as a journey into the heart of Native America--a case study of successful material adaptation and cultural borrowing.Beginning with a broad examination of regional demographics and folkways, Swagerty describes the cultural baggage and material preferences the expedition carried west in 1804. Detailing this baseline reveals which Indian influences were already part of Jeffersonian American culture, and which were progressive adaptations the Corpsmen made of Indian ways in the course of their journey. Swagerty's exhaustive research offers detailed information on both Indian and Euro-American science, medicine, cartography, and cuisine, and on a wide range of technologies and material culture. Readers learn what the Corpsmen wore, what they ate, how they traveled, and where they slept (and with whom) before, during, and after the return.

Indianization is as old as contact experiences between Native Americans and Europeans. Lewis and Clark took the process to a new level, accepting the hospitality of dozens of Native groups as they sought a navigable water route to the Pacific. This richly illustrated, interdisciplinary study provides a unique and complex portrait of the material and cultural legacy of Indian America, offering readers perspective on lessons learned but largely forgotten in the aftermath of the epic journey.

A Search For Belonging - A story about race, identity, belonging and displacement (Paperback): Michael Fuller A Search For Belonging - A story about race, identity, belonging and displacement (Paperback)
Michael Fuller 1
R256 R209 Discovery Miles 2 090 Save R47 (18%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Published originally as "Kill The Black One First" 'Absorbing... revealing and affecting. There are pleasures here, and lessons to be learnt, whatever colour you are' - The Sunday Times 'Michael Fuller is an extraordinary man with a remarkable and interesting story' - Helen Mirren Michael Fuller had an idyllic childhood growing up in care in Surrey, looked after by Margaret who gave him the love and comfort his biological mother never did. He loved to ride his bike and collect coins and stamps and grew up celebrating the freedom of 1960s Britain. But when he was nine, a local paper described him as the 'coloured boy' in his school production. It was the first time Michael felt judged based on the colour of his skin. Thirty-six years later, Michael became Britain's first ever black Chief Constable. That moment taught Michael he would always be searching for a place to belong. Hoping to tackle injustice and create change from within, he joined the police force, but experienced racism and inequality. From colleagues shouting racist insults into his office, to the Brixton Riots where 'Kill the black one first!' was yelled from the crowds. Determined, despite everything, not to turn and walk away, he rose through the ranks and made his way to the very top. A Search For Belonging is a story of resilience, persistence and optimism; of how one man set out, against the odds, to try and belong.

We Are Not Such Things - Murder. Justice. the Search for Truth. (Paperback): Justine Van Der Leun We Are Not Such Things - Murder. Justice. the Search for Truth. (Paperback)
Justine Van Der Leun 2
R293 R218 Discovery Miles 2 180 Save R75 (26%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

A `MAKING A MURDERER' set in South Africa - a gripping true-crime story of murder and the justice system in the shadow of apartheid In 1993 a young white American activist called Amy Biehl was brutally murdered by a group of men in a township near Cape Town. A few years later, two of the convicted murderers were working with Amy's parents at a charity set up in her memory. After the horrors of apartheid, hope and reconciliation had triumphed. It's an inspiring story. But is it just that - a story? `Your next true-crime obsession' Vogue `A Truman Capote-style detective story' Financial Times `Gripping, explosive . . . crafts a close sense of place that rivals the work of Katherine Boo' New York Times

Reproductive Rights as Human Rights - Women of Color and the Fight for Reproductive Justice (Paperback): Zakiya Luna Reproductive Rights as Human Rights - Women of Color and the Fight for Reproductive Justice (Paperback)
Zakiya Luna
R775 R718 Discovery Miles 7 180 Save R57 (7%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Reveals both the promise and the pitfalls associated with a human rights approach to the women of color-focused reproductive rights activism of SisterSong How did reproductive justice-defined as the right to have children, to not have children, and to parent-become recognized as a human rights issue? In Reproductive Rights as Human Rights, Zakiya Luna highlights the often-forgotten activism of women of color who are largely responsible for creating what we now know as the modern-day reproductive justice movement. Focusing on SisterSong, an intersectional reproductive justice organization, Luna shows how, and why, women of color mobilized around reproductive rights in the domestic arena. She examines their key role in re-framing reproductive rights as human rights, raising this set of issues as a priority in the United States, a country hostile to the concept of human rights at home. An indispensable read, Reproductive Rights as Human Rights provides a much-needed intersectional perspective on the modern-day reproductive justice movement.

London Calling - How Black and Asian Writers Imagined a City (Paperback, Illustrated Ed): Sukhdev Sandhu London Calling - How Black and Asian Writers Imagined a City (Paperback, Illustrated Ed)
Sukhdev Sandhu
R502 R357 Discovery Miles 3 570 Save R145 (29%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

From the 11th-century, when one commentator claimed the capital was being overrun with Moors, to the garage MCs and street poets of today - this book tells the story of life in London for black and Asian people from the 17th-century until today. `London Calling' tells the story of black and Asian literary London, tracing the escapades, fortune making, and self-expansion of these forgotten writers. It is a joyful and often rapturous work, a love letter to the capital, a teeming and complex mix of social and cultural history seen through the imagination and experience of great black and Asian writers. `London Calling' gets to the heart of the immigration impulse, and evokes the dreams and adventures of those who have sought refuge and asylum in the cradle of Empire. The book is populated by runaway slaves, lotharios, imams, boxer-pimps, rajahs and colonial revolutionaries, and discusses writers as diverse in style and time as the 18th-century grocer-aesthete Ignatius Sancho right through to Rushdie, Kureishi and yardie chronicler Victor Headley. The result is an exciting work, brimming with life, as it spotlights a rich but neglected literary tradition, and brings to life a gaping void in the city's history. Placing the multiculturalism of today's capital in its historical context, Sukhdev Sandhu shows that it is no new phenomenon, and that just as London has been the making of many black writers, they too have been the making of London.

Eloquent Rage - A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower (Paperback): Brittney Cooper Eloquent Rage - A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower (Paperback)
Brittney Cooper
R388 R332 Discovery Miles 3 320 Save R56 (14%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Far too often, Black women's anger has been caricatured into an ugly and destructive force that threatens the civility and social fabric of American democracy. But Cooper shows us that there is more to the story than that. Black women's eloquent rage is what makes Serena Williams such a powerful tennis player. It's what makes Beyonce's girl power anthems resonate so hard. It's what makes Michelle Obama an icon. Eloquent rage keeps us all honest and accountable. It reminds women that they don't have to settle for less. When Cooper learned of her grandmother's eloquent rage about love, sex, and marriage in an epic and hilarious front-porch confrontation, her life was changed. And it took another intervention, this time staged by one of her homegirls, to turn Cooper into the fierce feminist she is today. This book argues that ultimately feminism, friendship, and faith in one's own superpowers are all we really need to turn things right side up again.

American Indians and the Mass Media (Paperback, New): Meta G. Carstarphen, John P. Sanchez American Indians and the Mass Media (Paperback, New)
Meta G. Carstarphen, John P. Sanchez
R727 Discovery Miles 7 270 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Mention "American Indian," and the first image that comes to most people's minds is likely to be a figment of the American mass media: A war-bonneted chief. The Land O' Lakes maiden. Most American Indians in the twenty-first century live in urban areas, so why do the mass media still rely on Indian imagery stuck in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? How can more accurate views of contemporary Indian cultures replace such stereotypes? These and similar questions ground the essays collected in "American Indians and the Mass Media, " which explores Native experience and the mainstream media's impact on American Indian histories, cultures, and communities.

Chronicling milestones in the relationship between Indians and the media, some of the chapters employ a historical perspective, and others focus on contemporary practices and new technologies. All foreground American Indian perspectives missing in other books on mass communication. The historical studies examine treatment of Indians in America's first newspaper, published in seventeenth-century Boston, and in early Cherokee newspapers; "Life" magazine's depictions of Indians, including the famous photograph of Ira Hayes raising the flag at Iwo Jima; and the syndicated feature stories of Elmo Scott Watson. Among the chapters on more contemporary issues, one discusses campaigns to change offensive place-names and sports team mascots, and another looks at recent movies such as "Smoke Signals" and television programs that are gradually overturning the "movie Indian" stereotypes of the twentieth century.

Particularly valuable are the essays highlighting authentic tribal voices in current and future media. Mark Trahant chronicles the formation of the Native American Journalists Association, perhaps the most important early Indian advocacy organization, which he helped found. As the contributions on new media point out, American Indians with access to a computer can tell their own stories--instantly to millions of people--making social networking and other Internet tools effective means for combating stereotypes.

Including discussion questions for each essay and an extensive bibliography, "American Indians and the Mass Media" is a unique educational resource.

We Are in This Dance Together - Gender, Power and Globalization at a Mexican Garment Firm (Paperback, New): Nancy Plankey-Videla We Are in This Dance Together - Gender, Power and Globalization at a Mexican Garment Firm (Paperback, New)
Nancy Plankey-Videla
R827 Discovery Miles 8 270 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Changes in the global economy have real and contradictory outcomes for the everyday lives of women workers. In 2001, Nancy Plankey-Videla had a rare opportunity to witness these effects firsthand. Having secured access to one of Latin America's top producers of high-end men's suits in Mexico for participant-observer research, she labored as a machine operator for nine months on a shop floor made up of predominantly of women. The firm had recently transformed itself from traditional assembly to lean, cutting-edge, Japanese-style production methods. Lured initially into the firm by way of increased wages and benefits, workers had helped shoulder the company's increasing debts. When the company's plan for successful expansion went awry and it reneged on promises it made to the workforce, women workers responded by walking out on strike on March 15, 2001. Building upon in-depth interviews with over sixty workers, managers, and policy makers, Plankey-Videla documents and analyzes events leading up to the female-led factory strike and its aftermath-including harassment from managers, corrupt union officials and labor authorities, and violent governor-sanctioned police actions. We Are in This Dance Together illustrates how the women's shared identity as workers and mothers-deserving of dignity, respect, and a living wage-became the basis for radicalization and led to further civic organizing against the state, the company, and the corrupt union to demand justice.

Iroquois Art, Power, and History (Hardcover): Neal B Keating Iroquois Art, Power, and History (Hardcover)
Neal B Keating
R1,580 Discovery Miles 15 800 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In this richly illustrated book, Neal B. Keating explores Iroquois visual expression through more than five thousand years, from its emergence in ancient North America into the early twenty-first century. Drawing on extensive archival research and fieldwork with Iroquois artists and communities, Keating foregrounds the voices and visions of Iroquois peoples, revealing how they have continuously used visual expression to adapt creatively to shifting political and economic environments.

Iroquois, or Haudenosaunee, peoples have long been the subjects of Western study. From the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, European and Euro- American writers classified Iroquois works not as art but as culturally lower forms of expression. During the twentieth century, Western critics commonly rejected contemporary Native art both as art and as an "inauthentic" expression of Indianness. Keating exposes the false assumptions underlying these perceptions. Approaching his subject from the perspective of an anthropologist, he focuses on the social relations and processes that are indexed by Iroquois visual culture through time, and he shows how Iroquois images are deployed in colonized contexts.

As he traces the history of Iroquois art practice, Keating seeks a middle road between ethnohistorical approaches and the activist perspectives of contemporaryartists. He is one of the first scholars in Iroquois studies to emphasize painting, a popular art form among present-day Iroquois. He conceptualizes painting broadly, to include writing, incising, drawing, tattoo, body painting, photography, videography, and digital media. Featuring more than 100 color and black-and-white reproductions, this volume embraces a wide array of artworks in diverse media, prompting new appreciation--and deeper understanding--of Iroquois art and its historical and contemporary significance.

Modernity and the Holocaust (Paperback, New Ed): Zygmunt Bauman Modernity and the Holocaust (Paperback, New Ed)
Zygmunt Bauman
R493 Discovery Miles 4 930 Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Sociology is concerned with modern society, but has never come to terms with one of the most distinctive and horrific aspects of modernity - the Holocaust.

The book examines what sociology can teach us about the Holocaust, but more particularly concentrates upon the lessons which the Holocaust has for sociology. Bauman's work demonstrates that the Holocaust has to be understood as deeply involved with the nature of modernity. There is nothing comparable to this work available in the sociological literature.

In the Skin of a Jihadist - Inside Islamic State's Recruitment Networks (Paperback): Anna Erelle In the Skin of a Jihadist - Inside Islamic State's Recruitment Networks (Paperback)
Anna Erelle 1
R364 R263 Discovery Miles 2 630 Save R101 (28%) Ships in 10 - 15 working days

Twenty year-old "Melodie", a recent convert to Islam, meets the leader of an ISIS brigade on Facebook. In 48 hours he has `fallen in love' with her, calls her every hour, urges her to marry him, join him in Syria in a life of paradise - and join his jihad. She discovers how ISIS entraps ordinary people, like teenage girls from Bethnal Green. Anna Erelle is the undercover journalist behind "Melodie". Created to investigate the powerful propaganda weapons of Islamic State, "Melodie" is soon sucked in by Bilel, right-hand man of the infamous Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. An Iraqi for whose capture the US government has promised $10 million, al-Baghdadi is described by Time Magazine as the most dangerous man in the world and by himself as the caliph of Islamic State. Bilel shows off his jeep, his guns, his expensive watch. He boasts about the people he has just killed. With Bilel impatient for his future wife, "Melodie" embarks on her highly dangerous mission, which - at its ultimate stage - will go very wrong ... Enticed into this lethal online world like hundreds of other young people, including many young British girls and boys, Erelle's harrowing and gripping investigation helps us to understand the true face of terrorism.

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