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Books > Social sciences > Politics & government > Political control & freedoms > Political control & influence > Political oppression & persecution

Fallen Walls - Prisoners of Conscience in South Africa and Czechoslovakia (Hardcover): Lynda Gilfillan Fallen Walls - Prisoners of Conscience in South Africa and Czechoslovakia (Hardcover)
Lynda Gilfillan
R2,291 Discovery Miles 22 910 Out of stock

This collection of prison writings straddles two continents, and compares and contrasts the political struggles that gave birth to two vibrant new democracies of the twenty-first century: South Africa and the Czech Republic. The triumph over decades of suffering endured by the ordinary citizens of these two countries is symbolized by their leaders, Nelson Mandela and Vaclav Havel.

While the moral stature of these two men continues to act as a beacon for other political aspirants in a new century, they call upon us all to acknowledge the role played by ordinary men and women in effecting freedom and justice. For this reason, Fallen Walls focuses on the experiences of ordinary prisoners of conscience. It records three voices from the apartheid-era cells of Robben Island--Joseph Mati, Johnson Mgabela, Monde Mkunqwana--and three voices from communist-era prisons in Czechoslovakia--Jiri Mesicki, Lola Skodova, and Jiri Stransky. There are striking similarities as well as differences between the two sets of stories. On a personal level, the tales from Robben Island are characterized by an absence of bitterness and thoughts of revenge, while a sense of bleak isolation and lingering bitterness pervades accounts from the Czechoslovakian prisons and labor camps. The buoyant tone of triumph of the South Africans is balanced by the darker, more skeptical mood of the Czechs. In an age that teeters so precariously between hope and despair, the narratives of these six prisoners of conscience remind us not only of what we are, but also of what we may become.

In a timely warning against complacency, Vaclav Havel notes in his foreword that "the authors remind us anew of the price that is so often paid for freedom and democracy." Fallen Walls will be of interest to historians, sociologists, human rights activists, and political scientists.

Peaceful Resistance - Advancing Human Rights and Democratic Freedoms (Hardcover, New Ed): Robert M. Press Peaceful Resistance - Advancing Human Rights and Democratic Freedoms (Hardcover, New Ed)
Robert M. Press
R3,167 Discovery Miles 31 670 Out of stock

An innovative study that examines how peaceful, domestic tactics by individual human rights activists and organizational activists, with public support, can force an authoritarian regime to make key concessions. Robert Press explores the creation and impact of a culture of resistance. He examines how domestic pressure can be more important than foreign pressure for political reform, especially in underdeveloped, authoritarian states. This study of contemporary Kenya fills a gap in traditional social movement theory to show how a resistance movement actually starts. Contrary to long-dominant theory, the book shows how the initiative for such a movement can come from activists themselves in the face of severe obstacles in society. With its unique findings on the effects of individual activism and peaceful resistance, this book will attract a broad audience in the study and practice of international relations, comparative politics, sociology, interest groups, peace and conflict, and human rights.

Co-Memory and Melancholia - Israelis Memorialising the Palestinian Nakba (Hardcover, New): Ronit Lentin Co-Memory and Melancholia - Israelis Memorialising the Palestinian Nakba (Hardcover, New)
Ronit Lentin
R1,922 Discovery Miles 19 220 Out of stock

The 1948 war that led to the creation of the State of Israel also resulted in the destruction of Palestinian society when some 80 per cent of the Palestinians who lived in the major part of Palestine upon which Israel was established became refugees. Israelis call the 1948 war their 'War of Independence' and the Palestinians their 'Nakba', or catastrophe. After many years of Nakba denial, land appropriation, political discrimination against the Palestinians within Israel and the denial of rights to Palestinian refugees, in recent years the Nakba is beginning to penetrate Israeli public discourse. This book explores the construction of collective memory in Israeli society, where the memory of the trauma of the Holocaust and of Israel's war dead competes with the memory claims of the dispossessed Palestinians. Taking an auto-ethnographic approach, Ronit Lentin makes a contribution to social memory studies through a critical evaluation of the co-memoration of the Palestinian Nakba by Israeli Jews. Against a background of the Israeli resistance movement, Lentin's central argument is that co-memorating the Nakba by Israeli Jews is motivated by an unresolved melancholia about the disappearance of Palestine and the dispossession of the Palestinians, a melancholia that shifts mourning from the lost object to the grieving subject. Lentin theorises Nakba co-memory as a politics of resistance, counterpoising co-memorative practices by internally displaced Israeli Palestinians with Israeli Jewish discourses of the Palestinian right of return, and questions whether return narratives by Israeli Jews, courageous as they may seem, are ultimately about Israeli Jewish self-healing rather than justice for Palestine. -- .

Imprisoned Intellectuals - America's Political Prisoners Write on Life, Liberation, and Rebellion (Hardcover): Joy James Imprisoned Intellectuals - America's Political Prisoners Write on Life, Liberation, and Rebellion (Hardcover)
Joy James
R2,592 Discovery Miles 25 920 Out of stock

Prisons constitute one of the most controversial and contested sites in a democratic society. The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the industrialized world, with over 2 million people in jails, prisons, and detention centers; with over three thousand on death row, it is also one of the few developed countries that continues to deploy the death penalty. International Human Rights Organizations such as Amnesty International have also noted the scores of political prisoners in U.S. detention. This anthology examines a class of intellectuals whose analyses of U.S. society, politics, culture, and social justice are rarely referenced in conventional political speech or academic discourse. Yet this body of outlawed "public intellectuals" offers some of the most incisive analyses of our society and shared humanity. Here former and current U.S. political prisoners and activists-writers from the civil rights/black power, women's, gay/lesbian, American Indian, Puerto Rican Independence and anti-war movements share varying progressive critiques and theories on radical democracy and revolutionary struggle. This rarely-referenced "resistance literature" reflects the growing public interest in incarceration sites, intellectual and political dissent for social justice, and the possibilities of democratic transformations. Such anthologies also spark new discussions and debates about "reading"; for as Barbara Harlow notes: "Reading prison writing must. . . demand a correspondingly activist counterapproach to that of passivity, aesthetic gratification, and the pleasures of consumption that are traditionally sanctioned by the academic disciplining of literature." Barbara Harlow 1] 1. Barbara Harlow, Barred: Women, Writing, and Political Detention (New England: Wesleyan University Press, 1992). Royalties are reserved for educational initiatives on human rights and U.S. incarceration.

State Terrorism in Latin America - Chile, Argentina, and International Human Rights (Hardcover): Thomas C. Wright State Terrorism in Latin America - Chile, Argentina, and International Human Rights (Hardcover)
Thomas C. Wright
R2,311 R2,132 Discovery Miles 21 320 Save R179 (8%) Out of stock

Set in the larger context of the evolution of international human rights, this cogent book examines the tragic development and ultimate resolution of Latin America's human rights crisis of the 1970s and 1980s. Thomas Wright focuses especially on state terrorism in Chile under General Augusto Pinochet (1973 1990) and in Argentina during the Dirty War (1976 1983). The author probes the background of these regimes, the methodology of state terrorism, and the human rights movements that emerged in urgent response to the brutality of institutionalized torture, murder, and disappearance. He also discusses the legacies of state terrorism in the post-dictatorial period, particularly the bitter battle between demands for justice and the military's claim of impunity. Central to this struggle was the politics of memory as two radically different versions of the countries' recent history clashed: had the militaries conducted legitimate wars against subversion or had they exercised terrorism based on a misguided concept of national security? The book offers a nuanced exploration of the reciprocal relationship between state terrorism and its legacies, on one hand, and international human rights on the other. When the Chilean and Argentine militaries seized power, the international human rights lobby was too weak to prevent the massive toll of state terrorism. But the powerful worldwide response to these regimes ultimately strengthened international human rights treaties, institutions, and jurisprudence, paving the way for the Rwanda and Yugoslavia genocide tribunals and the International Criminal Court. Indeed, Chile and Argentina today routinely try and convict former repressors in their own courts. This compelling history demonstrates that the experiences of Chile and Argentina contributed to strengthening the international human rights movement, which in turn gave it the influence to affect the outcome in these two South American countries. Ironically, the brutal regimes of Chile and Argentina played the major role in transforming a largely dormant international lobby into a powerful force that today is capable of bringing major repressors from anywhere in the world to justice. These intertwined themes make this book important reading not only for Latin Americanists but for students of human rights and of international relations as well."

The Guantanamo Files - The Stories of the 774 Detainees in America's Illegal Prison (Hardcover): Andy Worthington The Guantanamo Files - The Stories of the 774 Detainees in America's Illegal Prison (Hardcover)
Andy Worthington
R2,176 Discovery Miles 21 760 Out of stock

This is the first book to tell the story of every man trapped in Guantanamo. In early 2006, the Pentagon released 7000 pages of transcripts from tribunals assessing the status of the 774 men illegally detained in Guantanamo Bay. Journalist Andy Worthington is the only person to have analyzed every page of these transcripts. This book weaves together the story of the prison and its inmates. For the first time, it brings to life the story of every man trapped in Guantanamo. Who are these men and why do they continue to be held without trial? This book goes at least some way towards answering the questions that the US has so far refused to engage with. It does not make for easy reading. Human rights abuses are commonplace under a system that allows for the arrest of any non-US citizen anywhere in the world. The book covers extensive detail on how each detainee was arrested. It includes evidence of mass killings of prisoners in Afghanistan, and people being picked up in Pakistan by bounty hunters for $5000 a head. Many men were clearly not enemy combatants. Some were involved in missionary work. Some where just in the wrong place at the wrong time. The book also includes extensive allegations of torture in US Afghan prisons, as well as within Guantanamo itself. Who will speak for the 774 men who still remain in Guantanamo? This passionate and brilliantly detailed book brings their stories to the world for the first time.

Bitter Flowers, Sweet Flowers - East Timor, Indonesia, and the World Community (Hardcover): Richard Tanter, Mark Selden,... Bitter Flowers, Sweet Flowers - East Timor, Indonesia, and the World Community (Hardcover)
Richard Tanter, Mark Selden, Stephen R. Shalom
R2,729 Discovery Miles 27 290 Out of stock

East Timor is at last, and at terrible human cost, firmly on the road to independence. The significance of its passage to freedom-for its people, for Asia, and for the world-is manifold. This volume offers a comprehensive overview of East Timor's travail and its triumph in its international context. East Timor's independence constitutes one of the final and most poignant moments in a long and bitter history of European colonization and decolonization. For the people of East Timor, independence from Portugal in 1975 was only the beginning of a new struggle against Indonesian invaders a struggle that took the lives of 200,000 East Timorese and one that is by no means over. The case of East Timor, both during and after the Cold War, provides a litmus test for issues of international responsibility, posing questions of double standards in unusually clear-cut form. It reveals the active support by the United States and other powers for the military forces of Indonesia throughout the years of that nation's invasion and repression of East Timor, until 1998 when the collapse of the Indonesian dictatorship ushered in a new phase in the East Timorese struggle. Contributions by: Peter Bartu, Noam Chomsky, Richard Falk, Geoffrey C. Gunn, Peter Hayes, Wade Huntley, Gerry Van Klinken, Helene Van Klinken, Arnold S. Kohen, Allan Nairn, Sarah Niner, Constancio Pinto, Geoffrey Robinson, Joao Mariano Saldanha, Charles Scheiner, Mark Selden, Stephen R. Shalom, and Richard Tanter."

Troubled Tiger - Businessmen, Bureaucrats and Generals in South Korea (Hardcover, 2nd New edition): Mark L. Clifford Troubled Tiger - Businessmen, Bureaucrats and Generals in South Korea (Hardcover, 2nd New edition)
Mark L. Clifford
R3,048 Discovery Miles 30 480 Out of stock

In this new edition of Clifford's widely acclaimed book, the author expands his analysis of modern Korea to include the dramatic events of recent years. These include the imprisonment and sentencing of two former presidents of South Korea for their role in the Kwangju uprising and on various charges of corruption, the death of Kim Il Sung in the North and the resultant exacerbation of the instability of the North-South standoff, with all its military/nuclear implications, and recent labor and student protests.

Taking Lives - Genocide and State Power (Hardcover, 5th New edition): Irving Louis Horowitz Taking Lives - Genocide and State Power (Hardcover, 5th New edition)
Irving Louis Horowitz
R2,312 Discovery Miles 23 120 Out of stock

Taking Lives is a pivotal effort to reconstruct the social and political contexts of twentieth century, state-inspired mass murder. Irving Louis Horowitz re-examines genocide from a new perspective -- viewing this issue as the defining element in the political sociology of our time. The fifth edition includes approximately 30 percent new materials with five new chapters. The work is divided into five parts: "Present as History Past as Prologue, " "Future as Memory, " "Toward A General Theory of State-Sponsored Crime, " "Studying Genocide." The new edition concludes with chapters reviewing the natural history of genocide studies from 1945 to the present, along with a candid self-appraisal of the author's work in this field over four decades.

Taking Lives asserts that genocide is not a sporadic or random event, nor is it necessarily linked to economic development or social progress. Genocide is a special sort of mass destruction conducted with the approval of the state apparatus. Life and death issues are uniquely fundamental, since they alone serve as a precondition for the examination of all other issues. Such concerns move us beyond abstract, formalist frameworks into new ways of viewing the social study of the human condition. Nearly all reviewers of earlier editions have recognized this. Taking Lives is a fundamental work for political scientists, sociologists, and all those concerned with the state's propensity toward evil.

Humanitarianism and the Emperor's Japan, 1877-1977 (Hardcover): Olive Checkland Humanitarianism and the Emperor's Japan, 1877-1977 (Hardcover)
Olive Checkland
R4,358 Discovery Miles 43 580 Out of stock

This study explores how Japan's reputation for humanitarianism rests on the generous behaviour accorded to 70,000 Russian prisoners of war in Japan, during the Russo-Japanese War (1904-05), and contrasts with the brutality displayed during the Pacific War (1941-45) towards 200,000 Allied prisoners of war.;The power of the state to coerce the people, by using the reverence felt for the Emperor, enabled the Japanese to switch humanitarianism on, or off, apparently at will. This volte-face is explored in this book. Olive Checkland is the author of "Britain's Encounter with Meiji Japan".

Return of Torture (Hardcover): Mattias Gardell Return of Torture (Hardcover)
Mattias Gardell
R2,515 Discovery Miles 25 150 Out of stock

This book provides a brief but wide-ranging history of torture in Europe and America as well as an analysis of its return in the aftermath of the 'war on terror'. During the state of exception declared in the wake of 9/11 2001, the Bush administration judicially sanctioned interrogation techniques that violated the ban of torture in US and Public International Law. While Barack Obama promised to restore the torture ban and habeas corpus, these practices have in fact expanded under his administration. By which logic could torture, a practice associated with the autocratic regimes of medieval and early modern Europe and contemporary dictatorships be introduced in a liberal democratic system of justice? What were the roles of public officials, government lawyers, elected representatives, and professionals (psychiatrists, behavioural scientists, anthropologists, physicians, interrogators)? What do we know about those tortured? What does the return of torture entail for us who are not tortured? What does it mean for our political system and the future of global order?

Surviving the Storm: A Memoir - A Memoir (Hardcover, Illustrated Ed): Chen Xuezhao Surviving the Storm: A Memoir - A Memoir (Hardcover, Illustrated Ed)
Chen Xuezhao
R2,660 Discovery Miles 26 600 Out of stock

Memoirs of the Chinese author, Chen Xeuzhao, who was branded a rightist by the communist authorities. The book tells of her suffering during the Cultural Revolution.

Lethal Politics - Soviet Genocide and Mass Murder Since 1917 (Hardcover): R. J Rummel Lethal Politics - Soviet Genocide and Mass Murder Since 1917 (Hardcover)
R. J Rummel
R3,715 Discovery Miles 37 150 Out of stock

While there are estimates of the number of people killed by Soviet authorities during particular episodes or campaigns, until now, no one has tried to calculate the complete human toll of Soviet genocides and mass murders since the revolution of 1917. Here, R. J. Rummel lists and analyzes hundreds of published estimates, presenting them in the historical context in which they occurred. His shocking conclusion is that, conservatively calculated, 61,911,000 people were systematically killed by the Communist regime from 1917 to 1987.

Rummel divides the published estimates on which he bases his conclusions into eight historical periods, such as the Civil War, collectivization, and World War II. The estimates are further divided into agents of death, such as terrorism, deportations, and famine. Using statistical principles developed from more than 25 years of quantitative research on nations, he analyzes the estimates. In the collectivization period, for example, about 11,440,000 people were murdered. During World War II, while the Soviet Union had lost almost 20,000,000 in the war, the Party was killing even more of its citizens and foreigners-probably an additional 13,053,000. For each period, he defines, counts, and totals the sources of death. He shows that Soviet forced labor camps were the major engine of death, probably killing 39,464,000 prisoners overall.

To give meaning and depth to these figures, Rummel compares them to the death toll from'major wars, world disasters, global genocide, deaths from cancer and other diseases, and the like. In these and other ways, Rummel goes well beyond the bare bones of statistical analysis and tries to provide understanding of this incredible toll of human lives. Why were these people killed? What was the political and social context? How can we understand it? These and other questions are addressed in a compelling historical narrative.

This definitive book will be of interest to Soviet experts, those interested in the study of genocide and violence, peace researchers, and students of comparative politics and society. Written without jargon, its statistics are confined to appendixes, and the general reader can profitably read the book without losing the essence of the findings, which are selectively repeated in the narrative.

Report of the Committee on the Enforced Disappearances - thirteenth session (4 - 15 September 2017) and fourteenth session (22... Report of the Committee on the Enforced Disappearances - thirteenth session (4 - 15 September 2017) and fourteenth session (22 May - 1 June 2018) (Paperback)
United Nations: Committee on Enforced Disappearances
R375 Discovery Miles 3 750 Out of stock

This is the annual report submitted to the General Assembly by the Committee on Enforced Disappearances covering its thirteenth (4-15 September 2017) and fourteenth (22 May-1 June 2018) sessions.

Human Rights in the Age of Platforms (Paperback): Rikke Frank Jorgensen Human Rights in the Age of Platforms (Paperback)
Rikke Frank Jorgensen; Foreword by David Kaye; Contributions by Shoshana Zuboff, Mikkel Flyverbom, Anja Bechmann, …
R759 Discovery Miles 7 590 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Scholars from across law and internet and media studies examine the human rights implications of today's platform society. Today such companies as Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Twitter play an increasingly important role in how users form and express opinions, encounter information, debate, disagree, mobilize, and maintain their privacy. What are the human rights implications of an online domain managed by privately owned platforms? According to the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, adopted by the UN Human Right Council in 2011, businesses have a responsibility to respect human rights and to carry out human rights due diligence. But this goal is dependent on the willingness of states to encode such norms into business regulations and of companies to comply. In this volume, contributors from across law and internet and media studies examine the state of human rights in today's platform society. The contributors consider the "datafication" of society, including the economic model of data extraction and the conceptualization of privacy. They examine online advertising, content moderation, corporate storytelling around human rights, and other platform practices. Finally, they discuss the relationship between human rights law and private actors, addressing such issues as private companies' human rights responsibilities and content regulation. Contributors Anja Bechmann, Fernando Bermejo, Agnes Callamard, Mikkel Flyverbom, Rikke Frank Jorgensen, Molly K. Land, Tarlach McGonagle, Jens-Erik Mai, Joris van Hoboken, Glen Whelan, Jillian C. York, Shoshana Zuboff, Ethan Zuckerman Open access edition published with generous support from Knowledge Unlatched and the Danish Council for Independent Research.

Consent of the Damed - Ordinary Argentinians in the Dirty War (Hardcover): David M.K. Sheinin Consent of the Damed - Ordinary Argentinians in the Dirty War (Hardcover)
David M.K. Sheinin
R1,551 Discovery Miles 15 510 Out of stock

Under violent military dictatorship, Operation Condor and the Dirty War scarred Argentina from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s, leaving behind a legacy of repression, state terror, and political murder. Even today, the now-democratic Argentine government attempts to repair the damage of these atrocities by making human rights a policy priority. But what about the other Dirty War, during which Argentine civilians--including indigenous populations--and foreign powers ignored and even abetted the state's vicious crimes against humanity? In this groundbreaking new work, David Sheinin draws on previously classified Argentine government documents, human rights lawsuits, and archived propaganda to illustrate the military-constructed fantasy of bloodshed as a public defense of human rights. Exploring the reactions of civilians and the international community to the daily carnage, Sheinin unearths how compliance with the dictatorship perpetuated the violence that defined a nation. This new approach to the history of human rights in Argentina will change how we understand dictatorship, democracy, and state terror.

The Mandelstam File and Der Nister File: Introduction to Stalin-era Prison and Labor Camp Records - Introduction to Stalin-era... The Mandelstam File and Der Nister File: Introduction to Stalin-era Prison and Labor Camp Records - Introduction to Stalin-era Prison and Labor Camp Records (Hardcover, New)
Peter B. Maggs
R2,535 Discovery Miles 25 350 Out of stock

Reproducing actual Soviet documents, this work examines what prison and labour camp files reveal of the fate of the poet Osip Mandelstam and the history of the Yiddish writer Pinhas Kahanovich (Der Nister). It also provides a guide to the analysis of Stalin-era prison and labour camp files.

Out of Order (Hardcover, New): Mary Corcoran Out of Order (Hardcover, New)
Mary Corcoran
R2,181 Discovery Miles 21 810 Out of stock

This book provides a comprehensive account of the imprisonment of women for politically motivated offences in Northern Ireland between 1972 and 1999. Women political prisoners were engaged in a campaign to obtain formal recognition as political prisoners, and then to retain this status after it was revoked. Their lengthy involvement in a prison conflict of international significance was notable as much because of its longevity as the radical aspects of their prison protests, which included hunger strikes, dirty-protests and campaigns against institutional abuses. Out of Order brings out the qualitatively distinctive character and punitive ethos of regimes of political imprisonment for women, exploring the dynamics of their internal organisation, the ways in which they subverted order and security in prison, and their strategies of resistance and exploitation. Drawing upon a wide range of first hand accounts and interviews this book brings together perspectives from the areas of political imprisonment, the penal punishment of women and the question of agency and resistance in prison to create a unique, highly readable study of a neglected subject.

Bitter Flowers, Sweet Flowers - East Timor, Indonesia, and the World Community (Paperback): Richard Tanter, Mark Selden,... Bitter Flowers, Sweet Flowers - East Timor, Indonesia, and the World Community (Paperback)
Richard Tanter, Mark Selden, Stephen R. Shalom
R1,288 R1,205 Discovery Miles 12 050 Save R83 (6%) Out of stock

East Timor is at last, and at terrible human cost, firmly on the road to independence. The significance of its passage to freedom-for its people, for Asia, and for the world-is manifold. This volume offers a comprehensive overview of East Timor's travail and its triumph in its international context. East Timor's independence constitutes one of the final and most poignant moments in a long and bitter history of European colonization and decolonization. For the people of East Timor, independence from Portugal in 1975 was only the beginning of a new struggle against Indonesian invaders a struggle that took the lives of 200,000 East Timorese and one that is by no means over. The case of East Timor, both during and after the Cold War, provides a litmus test for issues of international responsibility, posing questions of double standards in unusually clear-cut form. It reveals the active support by the United States and other powers for the military forces of Indonesia throughout the years of that nation's invasion and repression of East Timor, until 1998 when the collapse of the Indonesian dictatorship ushered in a new phase in the East Timorese struggle. Contributions by: Peter Bartu, Noam Chomsky, Richard Falk, Geoffrey C. Gunn, Peter Hayes, Wade Huntley, Gerry Van Klinken, Helene Van Klinken, Arnold S. Kohen, Allan Nairn, Sarah Niner, Constancio Pinto, Geoffrey Robinson, Joao Mariano Saldanha, Charles Scheiner, Mark Selden, Stephen R. Shalom, and Richard Tanter."

Imprisoned Intellectuals - America's Political Prisoners Write on Life, Liberation, and Rebellion (Paperback): Joy James Imprisoned Intellectuals - America's Political Prisoners Write on Life, Liberation, and Rebellion (Paperback)
Joy James
R1,101 Discovery Miles 11 010 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Prisons constitute one of the most controversial and contested sites in a democratic society. The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the industrialized world, with over 2 million people in jails, prisons, and detention centers; with over three thousand on death row, it is also one of the few developed countries that continues to deploy the death penalty. International Human Rights Organizations such as Amnesty International have also noted the scores of political prisoners in U.S. detention. This anthology examines a class of intellectuals whose analyses of U.S. society, politics, culture, and social justice are rarely referenced in conventional political speech or academic discourse. Yet this body of outlawed 'public intellectuals' offers some of the most incisive analyses of our society and shared humanity. Here former and current U.S. political prisoners and activists-writers from the civil rights/black power, women's, gay/lesbian, American Indian, Puerto Rican Independence and anti-war movements share varying progressive critiques and theories on radical democracy and revolutionary struggle. This rarely-referenced 'resistance literature' reflects the growing public interest in incarceration sites, intellectual and political dissent for social justice, and the possibilities of democratic transformations. Such anthologies also spark new discussions and debates about 'reading'; for as Barbara Harlow notes: 'Reading prison writing must. . . demand a correspondingly activist counterapproach to that of passivity, aesthetic gratification, and the pleasures of consumption that are traditionally sanctioned by the academic disciplining of literature.' Barbara Harlow 1] 1. Barbara Harlow, Barred: Women, Writing, and Political Detention (New England: Wesleyan University Press, 1992). Royalties are reserved for educational initiatives on human rights and U.S. incarceration.

State Terrorism in Latin America - Chile, Argentina, and International Human Rights (Paperback): Thomas C. Wright State Terrorism in Latin America - Chile, Argentina, and International Human Rights (Paperback)
Thomas C. Wright
R1,094 Discovery Miles 10 940 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Set in the larger context of the evolution of international human rights, this cogent book examines the tragic development and ultimate resolution of Latin America's human rights crisis of the 1970s and 1980s. Thomas Wright focuses especially on state terrorism in Chile under General Augusto Pinochet (1973 1990) and in Argentina during the Dirty War (1976 1983). The author probes the background of these regimes, the methodology of state terrorism, and the human rights movements that emerged in urgent response to the brutality of institutionalized torture, murder, and disappearance. He also discusses the legacies of state terrorism in the post-dictatorial period, particularly the bitter battle between demands for justice and the military's claim of impunity. Central to this struggle was the politics of memory as two radically different versions of the countries' recent history clashed: had the militaries conducted legitimate wars against subversion or had they exercised terrorism based on a misguided concept of national security? The book offers a nuanced exploration of the reciprocal relationship between state terrorism and its legacies, on one hand, and international human rights on the other. When the Chilean and Argentine militaries seized power, the international human rights lobby was too weak to prevent the massive toll of state terrorism. But the powerful worldwide response to these regimes ultimately strengthened international human rights treaties, institutions, and jurisprudence, paving the way for the Rwanda and Yugoslavia genocide tribunals and the International Criminal Court. Indeed, Chile and Argentina today routinely try and convict former repressors in their own courts. This compelling history demonstrates that the experiences of Chile and Argentina contributed to strengthening the international human rights movement, which in turn gave it the influence to affect the outcome in these two South American countries. Ironically, the brutal regimes of Chile and Argentina played the major role in transforming a largely dormant international lobby into a powerful force that today is capable of bringing major repressors from anywhere in the world to justice. These intertwined themes make this book important reading not only for Latin Americanists but for students of human rights and of international relations as well."

Actors on Red Alert - Career Interviews with Five Actors and Actresses Affected by the Blacklist (Hardcover): Anthony Slide Actors on Red Alert - Career Interviews with Five Actors and Actresses Affected by the Blacklist (Hardcover)
Anthony Slide
R1,310 R1,224 Discovery Miles 12 240 Save R86 (7%) Out of stock

The anti-Communist hysteria that began in the 1930s was further empowered in 1938 when the House of Representatives established the House Committee on UnAmerican Activities. Soon thereafter, the creation of the blacklist in the late 1940s brought the Hollywood film and television community into the fold. Provocatively capturing the controversy and sentiments surrounding this period of political imbalance, Actors on Red Alert explores the repercussions of the blacklist through career interviews with five prominent actors and actresses.

Memoirs of 1984 (Paperback): Yuri Tarnopolsky Memoirs of 1984 (Paperback)
Yuri Tarnopolsky
R707 Discovery Miles 7 070 Out of stock

Tarnopolsky recounts his year in a Siberian labor camp, and offers his interpretation of the fall of the Soviet Empire and the future Russian crossroads.

The Drama of Slavuta by Saul Moiseyevich Ginsburg (Hardcover): Ephraim H. Prombaum The Drama of Slavuta by Saul Moiseyevich Ginsburg (Hardcover)
Ephraim H. Prombaum
R1,582 R1,471 Discovery Miles 14 710 Save R111 (7%) Out of stock

Available for the first time in English, The Drama of Slavuta draws on Jewish sources and official Tsarist government archives in providing insight into the shutdown of a major nineteenth-century Jewish printing establishment during the reign of Tsar Nicholas I (1825-1855), when the persecution of Jews and suppression of Jewish culture reached unprecedented heights in Russia. The eminent historian Saul M. Ginsburg, who authored the original manuscript, successfully weaves an account of the persecution of the printing establishment's Hasidic owners, the Brothers Shapiro, into the larger scheme of official persecution of all Jews and thereby provides chilling insight into contemporary Russian attitudes towards Jews and Jewish culture. Contents: Volhynia Gubernia; Accusations Continue; The War Against Hasidism; "Yore-Deah"; Yakob Lipps; Forced Testimonies; The Imperial Decree; The Ushitza Story; The Military Commission's Verdict; "So Shall It Be"; "Araktsh Stones"; Moral Victors.

Eyewitness - Writings from the Ordeal of Communism (Hardcover, New): Ross Mackenzie, Todd Culbertson Eyewitness - Writings from the Ordeal of Communism (Hardcover, New)
Ross Mackenzie, Todd Culbertson
R969 R918 Discovery Miles 9 180 Save R51 (5%) Out of stock

The specter of communism that held sway over much of the twentieth century has been effectively laid to rest. But the evil it inflicted on many millions of people during that period should not be forgotten. Eyewitness: Writings from the Ordeal of Communism is intended to serve as a witness to that past and a warning to future generations. Composed of telling, often searing, excerpts from many eloquent testimonies - including Milovan Djilas, Elena Bonner, Vladimir Bukovsky, Leonid Plyushch, Natan Sharansky, Petro Grigorenko, and Anatoly Marchenko - Eyewitness speaks to the disillusion, the degradation, the despair, the loneliness and agony, and the occasional triumphs that formed the essence of the defector's apostasy.

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