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Books > Social sciences > Sociology, social studies > Ethnic studies > Indigenous peoples

Bahlabelelelani: Why Do They Sing? - Gender And Power In Contemporary Women's Songs (Paperback): Nompumelelo Zondi Bahlabelelelani: Why Do They Sing? - Gender And Power In Contemporary Women's Songs (Paperback)
Nompumelelo Zondi
R195 R168 Discovery Miles 1 680 Save R27 (14%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

Indigenous societies that are steeped in patriarchy have various channels through which they deal with abusive characteristics of relations in some of these communities. One such route is through songs, which sanction women to voice that which, bound by societal expectations, they would not normally be able to say. This book focuses on the nature of women’s contemporary songs in the rural community of Zwelibomvu, near Pinetown in KwaZulu-Natal. It aims to answer the question ‘Bahlabelelelani – Why do they sing?’, drawing on a variety of discourses of gender and power to examine the content and purposes of the songs.

Restricted by the custom of hlonipha, women resort to allusive language, such as is found in ukushoza, a song genre that includes poetic elements and solo dance songs. Other contexts include women’s social events, such as ilima, which refers to the collective activity that takes place when a group of women come together to assist another woman to complete a task that is typically carried out by women. During umgcagco (traditional weddings) and umemulo (girls’ coming-of-age ceremonies), songs befitting the occasion are performed. And neighbouring communities come together at amacece to perform according to izigodi (districts), where local maskandi women groups may be found performing for a goat or cow stake.

The songs, when read in conjunction with the interviews and focus group discussions, present a complex picture of women’s lives in contemporary rural KwaZulu-Natal, and they offer their own commentary on what it means to be a woman in this society.

Palaces Of Stone - Uncovering Ancient Southern African Kingdoms (Paperback): Mike Main, Thomas Huffman Palaces Of Stone - Uncovering Ancient Southern African Kingdoms (Paperback)
Mike Main, Thomas Huffman
R240 R192 Discovery Miles 1 920 Save R48 (20%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

Across the face of southern Africa are more than 460 remarkable stone palaces, once the abodes of kings. Some are small, others ramble, but many are absolutely astonishing: all are the legacy of kingdoms past.

Palaces of Stone brings to life the story of these early African societies, from AD 900 to approximately 1850. Some, such as Great Zimbabwe and Khami in Zimbabwe and Mapungubwe in South Africa, are famous world heritage sites, but the majority are unknown to the general public, unsung and unappreciated. Yet, the stone ruins that have survived tell a common story of innovative architecture and intricate stonework; flourishing local economies; long-distance travel; global trade; and emerging forms of political organisation.

By exploring a selection of known and unknown sites, Palaces of Stone reimagines the apparently empty spaces bequeathed to us by history, an Africa of places that once hummed with life. All that remains now are the ruins – a bedrock from which to unravel the past and understand the present.

The Eight Zulu Kings - From Shaka To Goodwill Zwelethini (Paperback): John Laband The Eight Zulu Kings - From Shaka To Goodwill Zwelethini (Paperback)
John Laband
R275 R220 Discovery Miles 2 200 Save R55 (20%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

In The Eight Zulu Kings, well-respected and widely published historian John Laband examines the reigns of the eight Zulu kings from 1816 to the present.

Starting with King Shaka, the renowned founder of the Zulu kingdom, he charts the lives of the kings Dingane, Mpande, Cetshwayo, Dinuzulu, Solomon and Cyprian, to today’s King Goodwill Zwelithini whose role is little more than ceremonial.

In the course of this investigation Laband places the Zulu monarchy in the context of African kingship and tracks and analyses the trajectory of the Zulu kings from independent and powerful pre-colonial African rulers to largely powerless traditionalist figures in post-apartheid South Africa.

The Assassination Of King Shaka - Zulu History's Dramatic Moment (Paperback): John Laband The Assassination Of King Shaka - Zulu History's Dramatic Moment (Paperback)
John Laband 1
R275 R220 Discovery Miles 2 200 Save R55 (20%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

In this riveting new book, John Laband, pre-eminent historian of the Zulu Kingdom, tackles some of the questions that swirl around the assassination in 1828 of King Shaka, the celebrated founder of the Zulu Kingdom and war leader of legendary brilliance: Why did prominent members of the royal house conspire to kill him? Just how significant a part did the white hunter-traders settled at Port Natal play in their royal patron's downfall? Why were Shaka's relations with the British Cape Colony key to his survival? And why did the powerful army he had created acquiesce so tamely in the usurpation of the throne by Dingane, his half-brother and assassin?

In his search for answers Laband turns to the Zulu voice heard through recorded oral testimony and praise-poems, and to the written accounts and reminiscences of the Port Natal trader-hunters and the despatches of Cape officials. In the course of probing and assessing this evidence the author vividly brings the early Zulu kingdom and its inhabitants to life. He throws light on this elusive character of and his own unpredictable intentions, while illuminating the fears and ambitions of those attempting to prosper and survive in his hazardous kingdom: a kingdom that nevertheless endured in all its essential characteristics, particularly militarily, until its destruction fifty one years later in 1879 by the British; and whose fate, legend has it, Shaka predicted with his dying breath.

The Politics Of Custom - Chiefship, Capital, And The State In Contemporary Africa (Paperback): John L. Comaroff, Jean Comaroff The Politics Of Custom - Chiefship, Capital, And The State In Contemporary Africa (Paperback)
John L. Comaroff, Jean Comaroff
R380 R327 Discovery Miles 3 270 Save R53 (14%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

How are we to explain the resurgence of customary chiefs in contemporary Africa? Rather than disappearing with the tide of modernity, as many expected, indigenous sovereigns are instead a rising force, often wielding substantial power and legitimacy despite major changes in the workings of the global political economy in the post–Cold War era—changes in which they are themselves deeply implicated.

This pathbreaking volume, edited by anthropologists John L. Comaroff and Jean Comaroff, explores the reasons behind the increasingly assertive politics of custom in many corners of Africa. Chiefs come in countless guises—from university professors through cosmopolitan businessmen to subsistence farmers–but, whatever else they do, they are a critical key to understanding the tenacious hold that “traditional” authority enjoys in the late modern world.

Together the contributors explore this counterintuitive chapter in Africa’s history and, in so doing, place it within the broader world-making processes of the twenty-first century.

Indigenous Food Sovereignty in the United States - Restoring Cultural Knowledge, Protecting Environments, and Regaining Health... Indigenous Food Sovereignty in the United States - Restoring Cultural Knowledge, Protecting Environments, and Regaining Health (Paperback)
Devon A. Mihesuah, Elizabeth Hoover; Foreword by Winona LaDuke
R791 Discovery Miles 7 910 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Centuries of colonization and other factors have disrupted indigenous communities' ability to control their own food systems. This volume explores the meaning and importance of food sovereignty for Native peoples in the United States, and asks whether and how it might be achieved and sustained. Unprecedented in its focus and scope, this collection addresses nearly every aspect of indigenous food sovereignty, from revitalizing ancestral gardens and traditional ways of hunting, gathering, and seed saving to the difficult realities of racism, treaty abrogation, tribal sociopolitical factionalism, and the entrenched beliefs that processed foods are superior to traditional tribal fare. The contributors include scholar-activists in the fields of ethnobotany, history, anthropology, nutrition, insect ecology, biology, marine environmentalism, and federal Indian law, as well as indigenous seed savers and keepers, cooks, farmers, spearfishers, and community activists. After identifying the challenges involved in revitalizing and maintaining traditional food systems, these writers offer advice and encouragement to those concerned about tribal health, environmental destruction, loss of species habitat, and governmental food control.

Die Herero-Opstand 1904-1907 (Afrikaans, Paperback): Gerhardus Pool Die Herero-Opstand 1904-1907 (Afrikaans, Paperback)
Gerhardus Pool
R287 Discovery Miles 2 870 Ships in 4 - 8 working days

Die Herero-opstand 1904–1907 is ’n heruitgawe van ’n boek wat ses keer tussen 1976 en 1979 deur HAUM gepubliseer is. Die lotgevalle van die Hererovolk word in hierdie boek geskets, ’n stuk geskiedenis wat ’n sentrale plek in Namibie se kleurryke geskiedenis beklee. Die opstand van die Herero’s in 1904 teen Duitse koloniale gesag kan beskou word as die enkele gebeurtenis wat die gebied se volksverhoudinge die ingrypendste verander het. Die Herero-opstand 1904–1907 vertel van die geleidelike opbou na die konflik, die skielike uitbarsting van geweld en die tragiese afloop vir die Herero’s toe duisende verhonger het en hulle grond en politieke seggenskap verloor het.

Pathways Across Cultures - Intercultural Communication in South Africa (Paperback): Milagros Rivera-Sanchez, Rentia du Plessis Pathways Across Cultures - Intercultural Communication in South Africa (Paperback)
Milagros Rivera-Sanchez, Rentia du Plessis
R260 R229 Discovery Miles 2 290 Save R31 (12%) Ships in 4 - 8 working days

Pathways across Cultures: Intercultural Communication in South Africa is a uniquely South African communication textbook. Local examples of communication methods from a wide range of cultural groups are used to explain theories of communication and complex intercultural concepts. It covers some of the rich cultural histories of the rainbow nation, such as Khoisan cave drawings, highlighting the intercultural communication styles of the early peoples who lived in South Africa. The book also includes critical commentary on western theories and approaches to studying intercultural communication. With a view to decolonising how intercultural communication is taught in South Africa, where possible the chapters in this book have been co-authored with emerging scholars. This approach provided mentoring opportunities for emerging scholars to develop case studies. As a result, this book has a wide-ranging perspective on intercultural communication that is representative of South Africa's own cultural diversity.

Popol Vuh - The Sacred Book of the Maya (Paperback): Allen J. Christenson Popol Vuh - The Sacred Book of the Maya (Paperback)
Allen J. Christenson
R660 Discovery Miles 6 600 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

The Popol Vuh is the most important example of Maya literature to have survived the Spanish conquest. It is also one of the world's great creation accounts, comparable to the beauty and power of Genesis. Most previous translations have relied on Spanish versions rather than the original K'iche'-Maya text. Based on ten years of research by a leading scholar of Maya literature, this translation with extensive notes is uniquely faithful to the original language. Retaining the poetic style of the original text, the translation is also remarkably accessible to English readers. Illustrated with more than eighty drawings, photographs, and maps, Allen J. Christenson's authoritative version brings out the richness and elegance of this sublime work of literature, comparable to such epic masterpieces as the Ramayana and Mahabharata of India or the Iliad and Odyssey of Greece.

Reinventing Hoodia - Peoples, plants, and patents in South Africa (Paperback): Laura A. Foster Reinventing Hoodia - Peoples, plants, and patents in South Africa (Paperback)
Laura A. Foster 1
R350 R301 Discovery Miles 3 010 Save R49 (14%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

Native to the Kalahari Desert, Hoodia gordonii is a succulent plant known by generations of indigenous San peoples to have a variety of uses: to reduce hunger, increase energy, and ease breastfeeding. In the global North, it is known as a natural appetite suppressant, a former star of the booming diet industry. In Reinventing Hoodia, Laura Foster explores how the plant was reinvented through patent ownership, pharmaceutical research, the self-determination efforts of indigenous San peoples, contractual benefit sharing, commercial development as an herbal supplement, and bioprospecting legislation. Using a feminist decolonial technoscience approach, Foster argues that although patent law is inherently racialized, gendered, and Western, it offered opportunities for indigenous San peoples, South African scientists, and Hoodia growers to make claims for belonging within the shifting politics of South Africa. This radical interdisciplinary and intersectional account of the multiple materialities of Hoodia illuminates the connections between law, science, and the marketplace, while demonstrating how these domains value certain forms of knowledge and matter differently.

Vergete wereld - Die klipmuurnedersettings van die Mpumalanga-platorand (Afrikaans, Paperback): Peter Delius, Tim Maggs, Alex... Vergete wereld - Die klipmuurnedersettings van die Mpumalanga-platorand (Afrikaans, Paperback)
Peter Delius, Tim Maggs, Alex Schoeman
R385 R331 Discovery Miles 3 310 Save R54 (14%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

If you drive through Mpumalanga with an eye on the landscape flashing by, you may see, near the sides of the road and further away on the hills above and in the valleys below, fragments of building in stone as well as sections of stone-walling breaking the grass cover. Endless stone circles, set in bewildering mazes and linked by long stone passages, cover the landscape stretching from Ohrigstad to Carolina, connecting over 10 000 square kilometres of the escarpment into a complex web of stone-walled homesteads, terraced fields and linking roads. Oral traditions recorded in the early twentieth century named the area Bokoni - the country of the Koni people. Few South Africans or visitors to the country know much about these settlements, and why today they are deserted and largely ignored. A long tradition of archaeological work which might provide some of the answers remains cloistered in universities and the knowledge vacuum has been filled by a variety of exotic explanations - invoking ancient settlers from India or even visitors from outer space - that share a common assumption that Africans were too primitive to have created such elaborate stone structures. Forgotten World defies the usual stereotypes about backward African farming methods and shows that these settlements were at their peak between 1500 and 1820, that they housed a substantial population, organised vast amounts of labour for infrastructural development, and displayed extraordinary levels of agricultural innovation and productivity. The Koni were part of a trading system linked to the coast of Mozambique and the wider world of Indian Ocean trade beyond. Forgotten World tells the story of Bokoni through rigorous historical and archaeological research, and lavishly illustrates it with stunning photographic images.

Living Nations, Living Words - An Anthology of First Peoples Poetry (Paperback): Joy Harjo Living Nations, Living Words - An Anthology of First Peoples Poetry (Paperback)
Joy Harjo; Foreword by Carla D. Hayden; As told to The Library of Congress
R330 R278 Discovery Miles 2 780 Save R52 (16%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

Joy Harjo, the first Native poet to serve as US Poet Laureate, has championed the voices of Native peoples past and present. Her signature laureate project gathers the work of contemporary Native poets into a national, fully digital map of story, sound, and space, celebrating their vital and unequivocal contributions to American poetry. This companion anthology features each poem and poet from the project to offer readers a chance to hold the wealth of poems in their hands. With work from Natalie Diaz, Ray Young Bear, Craig Santos Perez, Sherwin Bitsui, Layli Long Soldier, among others, Living Nations, Living Words showcases, as Joy Harjo writes in her stirring introduction, "poetry [that] emerges from the soul of a community, the heart and lands of the people. In this country, poetry is rooted in the more than 500 living indigenous nations. Living Nations, Living Words is a representative offering."

John Joseph Mathews - Life of an Osage Writer (Paperback): Michael Snyder John Joseph Mathews - Life of an Osage Writer (Paperback)
Michael Snyder; Foreword by Russ Tall Chief
R472 R394 Discovery Miles 3 940 Save R78 (17%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

John Joseph Mathews (1894-1979) is one of Oklahoma's most revered twentieth-century authors. An Osage Indian, he was also one of the first Indigenous authors to gain national renown. Yet fame did not come easily to Mathews, and his personality was full of contradictions. In this captivating biography, Michael Snyder provides the first book-length account of this fascinating figure. Known as ""Jo"" to all his friends, Mathews had a multifaceted identity. A novelist, naturalist, biographer, historian, and tribal preservationist, he was a true ""man of letters."" Snyder draws on a wealth of sources, many of them previously untapped, to narrate Mathews's story. Much of the writer's family life - especially his two marriages and his relationships with his two children and two stepchildren - is explored here for the first time. Born in the town of Pawhuska in Indian Territory, Mathews attended the University of Oklahoma before venturing abroad and earning a second degree from Oxford. He served as a flight instructor during World War I, traveled across Europe and northern Africa, and bought and sold land in California. A proud Osage who devoted himself to preserving Osage culture, Mathews also served as tribal councilman and cultural historian for the Osage Nation. Like many gifted artists, Mathews was not without flaws. And perhaps in the eyes of some critics, he occupies a nebulous space in literary history. Through insightful analysis of his major works, especially his semiautobiographical novel Sundown and his meditative Talking to the Moon, Snyder revises this impression. The story he tells, of one remarkable individual, is also the story of the Osage Nation, the state of Oklahoma, and Native America in the twentieth century.

Dance Ceremonies of the Northern Rio Grande Pueblos (Pamphlet): Kathryn Huelster, Dick Huelster Dance Ceremonies of the Northern Rio Grande Pueblos (Pamphlet)
Kathryn Huelster, Dick Huelster
R180 R153 Discovery Miles 1 530 Save R27 (15%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days
Inuit Morality Play - The Emotional Education of a Three-Year-Old (Paperback, New Ed): Jean L. Briggs Inuit Morality Play - The Emotional Education of a Three-Year-Old (Paperback, New Ed)
Jean L. Briggs
R575 Discovery Miles 5 750 Ships in 12 - 17 working days

"Is your mother good?" "Are you good?" "Do you want to come live with me?" Inuit adults often playfully present small children with difficult, even dangerous, choices and then dramatize the consequences of the child's answers. They are enacting in larger-than-life form the plots that drive Inuit social life-testing, acting out problems, entertaining themselves, and, most of all, bringing up their children. In a riveting narrative, psychological anthropologist Jean L. Briggs takes us through six months of dramatic interactions in the life of Chubby Maata, a three-year-old girl growing up in a Baffin Island hunting camp. The book examines the issues that engaged the child-belonging, possession, love-and shows the process of her growing. Briggs questions the nature of "sharedness" in culture and assumptions about how culture is transmitted. She suggests that both cultural meanings and strong personal commitment to one's world can be (and perhaps must be) acquired not by straightforwardly learning attitudes, rules, and habits in a dependent mode but by experiencing oneself as an agent engaged in productive conflict in emotionally problematic situations. Briggs finds that dramatic play is an essential force in Inuit social life. It creates and supports values; engenders and manages attachments and conflicts; and teaches and maintains an alert, experimental, constantly testing approach to social relationships.

Dine - A History of the Navajos (Paperback, 1st ed): Peter Iverson Dine - A History of the Navajos (Paperback, 1st ed)
Peter Iverson
R665 R545 Discovery Miles 5 450 Save R120 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

This comprehensive narrative traces the history of the Navajos from their origins to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Based on extensive archival research, traditional accounts, interviews, historic and contemporary photographs, and firsthand observation, it provides a detailed, up-to-date portrait of the Dine past and present that will be essential for scholars, students, and interested general readers, both Navajo and non-Navajo. As Iverson points out, Navajo identity is rooted in the land bordered by the four sacred mountains. At the same time, the Navajos have always incorporated new elements, new peoples, and new ways of doing things. The author explains how the Dine remember past promises, recall past sacrifices, and continue to build upon past achievements to construct and sustain North America's largest native community. Provided is a concise and provocative analysis of Navajo origins and their relations with the Spanish, with other Indian communities, and with the first Anglo-Americans in the Southwest. Following an insightful account of the traumatic Long Walk era and of key developments following the return from exile at Fort Sumner, the author considers the major themes and events of the twentieth century, including political leadership, livestock reduction, the Code Talkers, schools, health care, government, economic development, the arts, and athletics.

The Land Wars - The Dispossession Of The Khoisan And AmaXhosa In The Cape Colony (Paperback): John Laband The Land Wars - The Dispossession Of The Khoisan And AmaXhosa In The Cape Colony (Paperback)
John Laband 1
R320 R256 Discovery Miles 2 560 Save R64 (20%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

Perhaps the most explosive issue in South Africa today is the question of land ownership. The central theme in this country’s colonial history is the dispossession of indigenous African societies by white settlers, and current calls for land restitution are based on this loss. Yet popular knowledge of the actual process by which Africans were deprived of their land is remarkably sketchy.

This book recounts an important part of this history, describing how the Khoisan and Xhosa people were dispossessed and subjugated from the time that Europeans first arrived until the end of the Cape Frontier Wars (1779–1878).

The Land Wars traces the unfolding hostilities involving Dutch and British colonial authorities, trekboers and settlers, and the San, Khoikhoin, Xhosa, Mfengu and Thembu people – as well as conflicts within these groups. In the process it describes the loss of land by Africans to successive waves of white settlers as the colonial frontier inexorably advanced. The book does not shy away from controversial issues such as war atrocities on both sides, or the expedient decision of some of the indigenous peoples to fight alongside the colonisers rather than against them.

The Land Wars is an epic story, featuring well-known figures such as Ngqika, Lord Charles Somerset and his son, Henry, Andries Stockenström, Hintsa, Harry Smith, Sandile, Maqoma, Bartle Frere and Sarhili, and events such as the arrival of the 1820 Settlers and the Xhosa cattlekilling. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand South Africa’s past and present.

Decolonizing Methodologies - Research and Indigenous Peoples (Paperback, Third Edition): Linda Tuhiwai Smith Decolonizing Methodologies - Research and Indigenous Peoples (Paperback, Third Edition)
Linda Tuhiwai Smith
R532 Discovery Miles 5 320 Ships in 10 - 20 working days

With Decolonizing Methodologies, Linda Tuhiwai Smith made us rethink the relationship between scholarly research and the legacies of colonialism, and to confront the reality that, for the colonized, such research was often inextricably bound up with memories of exploitation. Offering a visionary new 'decolonizing' approach to research methodology, her book has continued to inspire generations of decolonial and indigenous scholars. This revised and expanded new edition demonstrates the continued importance of Tuhiwai Smith's work to today's struggles, including the growing movement to decolonize education and the university curriculum. It also features contributions from both new and established indigenous scholars on what a decolonizing approach means for both the present and future of academic research, and provides practical examples of how decolonial and indigenous methodologies have been fruitfully applied to recent research projects. Decolonizing Methodologies remains a definitive work in the ongoing struggle to reclaim indigenous ways of knowing and being.

Indians and Emigrants - Encounters on the Overland Trails (Paperback): Michael L. Tate Indians and Emigrants - Encounters on the Overland Trails (Paperback)
Michael L. Tate
R599 Discovery Miles 5 990 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In the first book to focus on relations between Indians and emigrants on the overland trails, Michael L. Tate shows that such encounters were far more often characterized by cooperation than by conflict. Having combed hundreds of unpublished sources and Indian oral traditions, Tate finds Indians and Anglo-Americans continuously trading goods and news with each other, and Indians providing various forms of assistance to overlanders.

Tate admits that both sides normally followed their own best interests and ethical standards, which sometimes created distrust. But many acts of kindness by emigrants and by Indians can be attributed to simple human compassion.

Not until the mid-1850s did Plains tribes begin to see their independence and cultural traditions threatened by the flood of white travelers. As buffalo herds dwindled and more Indians died from diseases brought by emigrants, violent clashes between wagon trains and Indians became more frequent, and the first Anglo-Indian wars erupted on the plains. Yet, even in the 1860s, Tate finds, friendly encounters were still the rule.

Despite thousands of mutually beneficial exchanges between whites and Indians between 1840 and 1870, the image of Plains Indians as the overland pioneers' worst enemies prevailed in American popular culture. In explaining the persistence of that stereotype, Tate seeks to dispel one of the West's oldest cultural misunderstandings.

Sand Talk - How Indigenous Thinking Can Save the World (Paperback): Tyson Yunkaporta Sand Talk - How Indigenous Thinking Can Save the World (Paperback)
Tyson Yunkaporta
R316 Discovery Miles 3 160 Ships in 12 - 17 working days
Tracking Tradition - A Practical Resource for Teaching About Indigenous Knowledge (Paperback, English Ed): Ruth Versfeld Tracking Tradition - A Practical Resource for Teaching About Indigenous Knowledge (Paperback, English Ed)
Ruth Versfeld
R150 R129 Discovery Miles 1 290 Save R21 (14%) Ships in 15 - 25 working days

This teaching and learning resource is produced in line with the changing curriculum in South African Schools. It considers the nature and value of culture, medicines, skills and artefacts.

What Dawid Knew - A Journey With The Kruipers (Paperback): Patricia Glyn What Dawid Knew - A Journey With The Kruipers (Paperback)
Patricia Glyn
R240 R206 Discovery Miles 2 060 Save R34 (14%) Ships in 5 - 10 working days

"You see, Mama, I told the truth. And so did my grandpa. It’s the last time before I die that I can show my descendants the truth about what happened here. Now I can rest." – Dawid Kruiper to Patricia Glyn.

Dawid Kruiper was an old Bushman with a secret that had been kept in his family for over a century, and which he wanted to hand on to his sons before he died. But he didn’t have the means to take his children back to the place where his grandfather had witnessed the horror that silenced him.

So Dawid asked Patricia Glyn to help him mount the great – and final – odyssey of his life. For two months in 2011, three generations of the Kruiper family, Patricia and her expedition crew travelled through the Kalahari, visiting and documenting places where Dawid and his forebears had roamed when they were ‘wild’ and free in the decades before the outsiders arrived in their homeland. And their journey culminated in Dawid releasing his secret to the world.

This is the story of how Patricia’s assumptions about and relationships with the Kruiper family were tested to the limit before they trusted her with their knowledge and stories. Patricia slowly gains an understanding of the depth of the Kruipers’ pain after centuries of genocide, prejudice and dispossession. The result is a candid but compassionate account of how this historical trauma manifests in the everyday lives of a contemporary Bushman family.

Patricia describes what she learned from the family about humankind’s original relationship with wilderness and the natural world. She recounts the Kruipers’ extraordinary veld knowledge and intuition, their inbuilt GPS and prescience.

This is an eco-adventure with a difference. What Dawid Knew explores the personal history and heritage of a remarkable family and what the Bushmen have to teach us about respect for, and responsible management of, our natural resources.

Killers of the Flower Moon - Oil, Money, Murder and the Birth of the FBI (Paperback): David Grann Killers of the Flower Moon - Oil, Money, Murder and the Birth of the FBI (Paperback)
David Grann 1
R274 R172 Discovery Miles 1 720 Save R102 (37%) Ships in 12 - 17 working days

WINNER OF THE EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST FACT CRIME SHORTLISTED FOR THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN NON-FICTION SHORTLISTED FOR THE CWA ALCS GOLD DAGGER FOR NON-FICTION **SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY MARTIN SCORSESE STARRING LEONARDO DICAPRIO AND ROBERT DE NIRO** 'A riveting true story of greed, serial murder and racial injustice' JON KRAKAUER 'A fiercely entertaining mystery story and a wrenching exploration of evil' KATE ATKINSON 'A fascinating account of a tragic and forgotten chapter in the history of the American West' JOHN GRISHAM From the bestselling author of The Lost City of Z, now a major film starring Charlie Hunnam, Sienna Miller and Robert Pattison, comes a true-life murder story which became one of the FBI's first major homicide investigations. In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. As the death toll climbed, the FBI took up the case. But the bureau badly bungled the investigation. In desperation, its young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. Together with the Osage he and his undercover team began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. 'David Grann has a razor-keen instinct for suspense' LOUISE ERDRICH

Indian Blues - American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879-1934 (Paperback): John W. Troutman Indian Blues - American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879-1934 (Paperback)
John W. Troutman
R669 Discovery Miles 6 690 Ships in 7 - 11 working days

From the late nineteenth century through the 1920s, the U.S. government sought to control practices of music on reservations and in Indian boarding schools. At the same time, Native singers, dancers, and musicians created new opportunities through musical performance to resist and manipulate those same policy initiatives. Why did the practice of music generate fear among government officials and opportunity for Native peoples? In this innovative study, John W. Troutman explores the politics of music at the turn of the twentieth century in three spheres: reservations, off-reservation boarding schools, and public venues such as concert halls and Chautauqua circuits. On their reservations, the Lakotas manipulated concepts of U.S. citizenship and patriotism to reinvigorate and adapt social dances, even while the federal government stepped up efforts to suppress them. At Carlisle Indian School, teachers and bandmasters taught music in hopes of imposing their ""civilization"" agenda, but students made their own meaning of their music. Finally, many former students, armed with saxophones, violins, or operatic vocal training, formed their own ""all-Indian"" and tribal bands and quartets and traversed the country, engaging the market economy and federal Indian policy initiatives on their own terms. While recent scholarship has offered new insights into the experiences of ""show Indians"" and evolving powwow traditions, Indian Blues is the first book to explore the polyphony of Native musical practices and their relationship to federal Indian policy in this important period of American Indian history.

Canoe Indians of Down East Maine (Paperback): William A. Haviland Canoe Indians of Down East Maine (Paperback)
William A. Haviland
R402 R329 Discovery Miles 3 290 Save R73 (18%) Ships in 7 - 11 working days

In 1604, when Frenchmen landed on Saint Croix Island, they were far from the first people to walk along its shores. For thousands of years, Etchemins--whose descendants were members of the Wabanaki Confederacy-- had lived, loved and labored in Down East Maine. Bound together with neighboring people, all of whom relied heavily on canoes for transportation, trade and survival, each group still maintained its own unique cultures and customs. After the French arrived, they faced unspeakable hardships, from "the Great Dying," when disease killed up to 90 percent of coastal populations, to centuries of discrimination. They never abandoned Ketakamigwa, their homeland. In this book, anthropologist William Haviland relates the history of hardship and survival endured by the natives of the Down East coast and how they have maintained their way of life over the past four hundred years.

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Edison Eskeets, Jim Kristofic Hardcover R560 R451 Discovery Miles 4 510
First People - The Early Indians of…
Keith Egloff, Deborah Woodward Paperback R354 R293 Discovery Miles 2 930
Covered with Night - A Story of Murder…
Nicole Eustace Hardcover R635 R515 Discovery Miles 5 150
When the Light of the World Was Subdued…
Joy Harjo Paperback R467 R399 Discovery Miles 3 990
WHEREAS
Layli Long Soldier Paperback R250 R215 Discovery Miles 2 150

 

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